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Full text of "The Heritage Lodge no. 730, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C. : proceedings 1980-1981"

^roceebtngs! 

Cf)e Heritage Xobge &oJZO 



INSTITUTED 

Sept. 21, 1977 

Donald G.S. Grinton, 
28 Cambridge Drive 
Brantford, Ontario 
N3R 5E2 
(519) 759-3182 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

Jacob Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Avenue 
Guelph, Ontario 
NIG 2L8 
(519) 821-4995 



Vol. 04, No. 01 Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



September, 1980 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular 
Meeting and General Purpose Committee Meeting; Proceedings of 
the Fourteenth Regular Meeting held on Wednesday, September 17, 
1980; Report of Fraternal visit to Occident Lodge No. 346, 
Tuesday September .2, 1980; and notice of coming events. 

NOTE: The opinions expressed by authors, reviewers and 

participants in the papers and discussions presented in 
these Proceedings are not necessarily those of the Lodge 
or its members. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, 
you are hereby requested to attend the Fifteenth Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple located at the North-East corner of the intersection of 
Highways No. 401 and No. 24 on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 19th, 1980, AT 7:30 P.M. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. This is 
also the occasion of the Installation and Investiture of the 
Worshipful Master and the Officers of the Lodge. The Installing 
Master will be R.W.Bro. James Curtis and the Master-Elect is 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw; we hope that a large number of 
masons will be present for this important event. We shall also 
be pleased to receive R.W.Bro. Talbot L. Peyton, District 
Deputy Grand Master of Waterloo District on his Official visit. 

The Reports of the Committees of Enquiry for the 
Applications for Affiliation as presented in the last Pro- 
ceedings, Vol. 03, No. 04, May, 1980, all reported favourable, 
and we shall therefore ballot on the following at the Regular 
Meeting, November 19th, 1980: 



- 2 



1. R.W.Bro. Clifford John Baxter; Age 55; Meat Manager; 88 
Redpath Ave., Apt. 1202, Toronto, Ontario. 

2. R.W.Bro. Hugh Matheson Dunlop; Age 62; Farmer; R.R. #6, 
Dresden, Ontario. 

3. R.W.Bro. Jack Allister Foster; Age 77; Retired; 323 Niagara 
Blvd., Fort Erie, Ontario. 

4. R.W.Bro. Robert Thomas Runciman; Age 46; Provincial Judge; 
37 Glowcester Crt. , Sudbury, Ontario. 

5. R.W.Bro. Francis Roy Weatherdon; Age 65; Retired; 968 
Bricker St., Box 623, Port Elgin, Ontario. 

6. W.Bro. Donald William Bain; Age 39; Real Estate Broker; 
131 Campbell Ave., North Bay, Ontario. 

7. W.Bro. Jack Dale; Age 62; Retired; 71 Salisbury Ave., 
Cambridge, Ontario. 

8. W.Bro. Gordon Albert Down; Age 54; Warehouse Manager; 1465 
Tyneburn Cresc, Apt. 102, Mississauga, Ontario. 

9. W.Bro. Kenneth Duncan Fraser; Age 49; Fire Fighter; 59 
Nightingale Drive, North Bay, Ontario. 

10. W.Bro. Thomas Arch Johnson; Age 68; Retired; 542 Chester 
St., London, Ontario. 

11. W.Bro. Robert Denzey Jones; Age 67; Retired; 46 Mikel Ave., 
Belleville, Ontario. 

12. W.Bro. Richard Allan Liebrock; Age 34; Sales Representative; 
2515 Grand Marais W., Windsor, Ontario. 

13. W.Bro. Ian Alexander McSkimming; Age 33; Customs Inspector; 
373 Detroit Street #509, Windsor, Ontario. 

14. W.Bro. Hilary F.J. Mavin; Age 54; Teacher; 1 English Rd., 
Chatham, Ontario. 

15. W.Bro. Robert Joseph Thomas Smith; Age 43; Railway Clerk; 
111 Tweedsmuir Drive, North Bay, Ontario. 

16. W.Bro. William R. Smith; Age 66; Retired (Bendix Corp.); 
997 Bruce Ave., Windsor, Ontario. 

17. Bro. John D. Chadbourne; Age 46; Manager; 134 Lindsay St., 
North Bay, Ontario. 

18. Bro. Arnold Russell Colbert; Age 32; Principal-Teacher; 
272 Rita Road, North Bay, Ontario. 

19. Bro. Neil Reginald Drury; Age 42; Plant Superintendant; 
23 Beaver Cr., North Bay, Ontario. 

20. Bro. Arthur James Mclsaac; Age 45; Financial Manager; 31 
Superior Cr., North Bay, Ontario. 



- 3 - 



21. Bro. Arthur Blackford Patterson; Age 63; Solicitor; 11 
Crescent Court, Lindsay, Ontario. 

22. Bro. Terrance John Thorn; Age 53; Teacher; Box 771, 340 Avery 
Drive, Espanola, Ontario. 

23. Bro. Donald Victor Harold Vale; Age 36; Crown Attorney; 
613 Norman Ave., North Bay, Ontario. 

24. Bro. Aube Weisman; Age 66; Linen Supplier; 141 Cedarvale 
Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 

25. Bro. Lint Arthur Welin; Age 43; Clerk; 455 O'Brien St., 
North Bay, Ontario. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

The next General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held in 
the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 15th, 1980 AT 7;30 P.M. 

prompt for the purpose of transacting and discussing the Lodge 
business. All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and 
Appointed Committees are urgently requested to attend. All 
members are particularly welcome as a number of very important 
items of unfinished business from the previous meeting are to 
be concluded at this meeting. 

NOTE: In order to expedite the business and to improve the 

efficiency of the deliberations, it is imperitive that 
each Committee Chairman, or his Designate, and any other 
person submitting a report, present his report in 
writing. Only written reports and resolutions will be 
accepted for discussion. 



Sincerely and fraternally, 



V.W.Bro. J. Pos, Secretary 



PROCEEDINGS 

The Fourteenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 
730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, 
Cambridge, Wednesday, September 17th, A.D. 1980, with 10 
Officers, 29 Members and 8 Visitors for a total of 47 Masons as 
per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the first degree at 7:40 p.m. by 



R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn who welcomed the Brethren present and 
expressed the regrets of R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, the Worshipful 
Master who was unable to be present. 

RECEIVING VISITORS 

At this time, R.W.Bro. Gary Powell, acting as Director of 
Ceremonies, introduced 12 past provincial Grand Lodge Officers 
who were welcomed by the Worshipful Master and invited to join 
him in the East. 

W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, Worshipful Master of Concord 
Lodge No. 722, was received with Grand Honours. 

The D. of C. was again admitted to introduce 8 Grand Lodge 
Officers who were accorded the customary welcome with Grand 
Honours . 

AT THE ALTAR 

W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, Lodge Chaplain approaches the 
altar for the opening service: 

There were THREE Grand Masters at the building of King 
Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem. There have been 59 Grand Masters 
of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario. There 
have been THREE Worshipful Masters of The Heritage Lodge, and 
tonight we are to elect a fourth. All of the brethren have had 
distinctive gifts which they were able to use for the enrichment 
of our Order. This is what St. Paul was pointing out in his 
Letter to the Corinthians (1. Cor. 12: 4-6, Phillips Trans- 
lation) : 

"Men have different gifts, but it is the same Spirit who 
gives them. There are different ways of serving God, but it 
is the same Lord who is served. God works through different 
men in different ways, but it is the same God who achieves his 
purposes through them all. Each man is given his gift by the 
Spirit that he may use it for the common good." 

Let Us Pray 

Eternal God, we would pause in these moments to reflect 
upon the distinct and unique gifts of those who have devised, 
developed, and directed our Blessed Fraternity over the 
Centuries and generations of its long history. We thank thee 
for their devotion and dedication. May those who are selected 
to continue that direction of The Heritage Lodge during the 
forthcoming months be given the same inspiration and insight 
that thy purposes may be more fully achieved through them all. 
Amen. 

So Mote it Be. 

PAPER PRESENTATION 

At 8:00 p.m. the Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce, Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Information, to 
proceed with the education portion of the meeting. After intro- 
ducing the two authors of the paper, W.Bro. George A. Campbell 



- 5 - 

and R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls, R.W.Bro. Bruce then called 
on R.W.Bro. Funnalls to present the paper. 

In his opening remarks, R.W.Bro. Runnalls conveyed to the 
Brethren that W.Bro. Campbell, who had written the major por- 
tion of the paper, was very disappointed that the pressures of 
his work made it impossible for him to present the paper in 
person. 

The following paper was then presented by R.W.Bro. Runnalls 



OUR. GRAND MASTERS 

A.F. & A.M. , G.R.C. 

1855 - 1980 



W.Bro. George A. Campbell R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls 



It would seem fitting that during the 125th anniversary of 
our Grand Lodge that we pause for a short time to reflect on 
those who during this long period of time led our beloned Craft 
in this Province. 

The Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario is the 
successor of three Provincial Grand Lodges. In 1972, William 
Jarvis, the first Provincial Secretary of the Government of 
Upper Canada, received a warrant from the Athol Grand Lodge of 
England (Antients) to form a Provincial Grand Lodge in Upper 
Canada. Thirty years later, Simon McGillivray, a fur-trading 
official, was appointed Provincial Grand Master of the second 
Provincial Grand Lodge. He was followed in 1845 by Sir Allan 
MacNab, a native-born son, as the third Provincial Grand Master. 
These three leaders were appointed by the Grand Masters of 
England without consultation in any way with the Canadian 
brethren and they were not accountable to anyone or group in 
Canada, and as they were apathetic to overseas causes, con- 
ditions in regards to Freemasonry in Canada became intolerable. 
This led, over a period of time, to the movement which culmin- 
ated on October 10, 18 55, in the formation of the Grand Lodge 
of Canada. Much hard feeling resulted and without the able 
leadership of our first Grand Master, William Mercer Wilson, it 
might have been disastrous. In the 'History of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario', written for the 
75th anniversary in 1930, W.S. Herrington said, in part, "The 
outstanding feature of this meeting was the address of the 
Grand Master, William Mercer Wilson. To him the Masons of 
Canada owe more than any other person of his or any other 
generation, for it was his judicial mind, schooled in the art 
of balancing the scales of justice, that brushed aside the 
trivial technicalities that stood in the way and brought order 
out of chaos. It was his patient leadership that marshalled 
the forces of temperance and brotherly love against those of 
selfishness and prejudice and came out victor in the end, but 
not without many a lively skirmish. It was his skill and 
superior knowledge of human nature that perfected the organi- 
zation he helped bring into being. His address upon this 
occasion was a master piece that might well be put forward as 



- 6 



a model" . 

Brethren might well look up and read the above-mentioned 
address. It outlines all the different steps taken in the 
formation of the Grand Lodge and the difficult issues that 
followed. 

Canadian Masonry was fortunate in having such a man at such 
a time. William Mercer Wilson was born on September 23, 1813, 
in Scotland. He had a brilliant career in Canada as a news- 
paper man, a civic leader, a soldier and a lawyer. He finally 
became a Judge of the County of Norfolk. He was a member of 
St. John's Lodge, Simcoe, later named Norfolk Lodge, No. 10, 
G.R.C. He held office in the third Provincial Grand Lodge and 
was Grand Senior Warden in 1855. He filled the office of Grand 
Master in the new Grand Lodge for three periods for a total of 
ten years. His death occurred on January 16, 1875, while he 
was still in office. 

In order to place Wilson in his proper time slot in history, 
we might consider a few sentences of the address of M. Cleve 
Hooper, P.G.M. (Hon.) given at the graveside on June 20, 1965, 
in which he said, "He was born in Scotland in the reign of 
George III and died about half-way through the reign of Queen 
Victoria. He came to this country, alone at 18, travelling of 
course by sailing ship. He never saw a paved highway, a 
telephone, an incandescent electric light or a typewriter. He 
never rode a bicycle or saw a vehicle with rubber tires. He 
was a senior contemporary and friend of Sir John A. Macdonald 
and established a friendship or at least a contact with most of 
the Governors General of Canada up to the time of his death" . 

Fifty nine Grand Masters have graced the East in the Grand 
Lodge of Canada over the period of 125 years. It has been the 
custom for each to occupy the throne for a two year period. 
Several have extended that time. T.D. Harington had a four 
year term and A. A. Stevenson three. Several others completed 
their predecessors' terms and went on to serve their regular 
terms. Three were content with one year terms. They were 
James Seymour in 1871, James Moffatt in 1881 and Benjamin Allen 
in 1904. Two Grand Masters died in office. William Mercer 
Wilson's term was completed by J.K. Kerr. R.B. Hungerford 
died on July 9, 1901, and it fell to the lot of J.E. Harding to 
complete his term and to carry on his own two year term. 

A perusal of the professions or occupations of our Grand 
Masters shows some surprises. Of the fifty-nine Grand Masters, 
twenty-one followed the legal profession, four of whom rose to 
the rank of Judge, while one, W.H. Wardrope, was offered a 
judgship but declined. Our first Grand Master, as stated above, 
was Judge for the County of Norfolk. He was followed by J.E. 
Harding, Judge for the County of Victoria, Daniel MacWatt, 
Judge for Lambton County, and Russell Treleaven, who was 
appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario. Several used the 
profession to enter government service. W.H. Weller, of 
Coburg, was Master in Chancery, W.R. White became legal counsel 
for the C.P.R., James Burnett was Crown Attorney for Renfrew 
County, Aubrey White, Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests, and 
F.W. Harcourt became Official Guardian of Ontario. 



Many of our Grand Masters served in the armed forces during 
conflicts. A few continued on in peace time while they engaged 
in their ordinary civic duties. A. A. Stevenson was a Lieutenant 
Colonel in the Montreal Field Battery and other military units. 
James Moffatt was a Lieutenant Colonel in London and was prom- 
inent in First Military District. J.M. Gibson, rising through 
the ranks, became Honorary Colonel and Commander of the 
Fifteenth Infantry. Lieutenant Colonel W.N. Ponton of the 
Queen's Own Rifles became commander of the Fifteenth Battalion 
in Belleville. E.W. Nancekivell has had over 30 years 
association with military units in Hamilton, first in the Royal 
Medical Corps followed by the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders 
with a special interest in the military Band. 

Nine Grand Masters were elected members of parliament or 
appointed to the senate. Several attained cabinet rank. 
Perhaps the most noted was J.M. Gibson of Hamilton who held 
several portfolios in the Ontario Government. In 1879, at the 
general Provincial election his opponent was another future 
Grand Master, Hugh Murray, J. A. Anderson was M.L.A. for High 
Park, J. A. Irvine, M.P. for Middlesex, J.S. Martin, M.L.A. for 
Norfolk and Minister of Agriculture. W.J. Dunlop, after a 
life-time in education, became Minister of Education for Ontario. 
J.N. Allan, a farmer and dairyman of Dunnville served in several 
portfolios in the Ontario legislature and W.D. McPherson, a 
lawyer of Toronto, represented West Toronto and was Provincial 
Secretary in the Hearst administration. J.K. Kerr was appointed 
to the Senate and became Speaker in 1909. William Gibson of 
Beamsville was first elected a member of parliament for Lincoln 
County and later was appointed to the Senate. J.R. Robertson 
represented a Toronto riding in the House of Commons for one 
term. He later refused both a seat in the Senate and a knight- 
hood . 

Four others were employees in government service. Our 
second Grand Master, who was a very prominent Mason in this time, 
T.D. Harington, was collector of customs at Ottawa and 
Prescott. He was followed in this profession by W.B. Simpson at 
Brockville. A. A. Stevenson, who was the only non-resident of 
Ontario to serve as Grand Master, lived in Montreal and was 
prominent in government service and the militia there. Daniel 
Spry was District Postal Inspector at Barrie and London. 

Education claimed eight Grand Masters. W.J. Drope , of 
Grimsby, operated a private boys' school there. W.J. Dunlop 
was with the extension department of the University of Toronto. 
J. A. McRae was a professor at Queen's University, Kingston, 
and N.C. Hart was a professor at Western University, London. 
Our present Grand Master, N.R. Richards, is a professor at the 
University of Guelph. B.B. Foster, before his retirement, was 
principal of Ridgetown Secondary School, and W.K. Bailey and 
H.L. Martyn were Superintendents with the Toronto Board of 
Education. 

Only three have followed the medical profession. J. A. 
Dobbie was Superintendent of the Ottawa Civic Hospital. G.E. 
Turner practices in Windsor and is interested in industrial 
medicine, while E.W. Nancekivell has a thriving practice in 
Hamilton. 



Three, after serving as Grand Masters, went on to become 
Grand Secretaries. They are Hugh Murray, J. A. Irvine and 
R.E. Davies, our present Grand Secretary. 

The clergy can boast of one representative only, W.L. 
Wright of Sault Ste, Marie. Three others were sons of clergy- 
men, namely, W.H. Wardrope, W.J. Dunlop and R.W. Treleaven. 

Sixteen may be classed as industrialists covering a wide 
sphere of endeavours. We note such lines as building, brass 
manufacturing, making of farm machinery, shoe construction, 
insurance, merchants, financial firms, among them. Looking 
back over the record we must come to the conclusion that all 
were astute business men making a success of their field of 
labour. 

Newspaper work seems to have had a distinct attraction as 
no fewer than six had this as their profession at some time in 
their career. They were W.M. Wilson, James Seymour, A.T. Freed, 
J.R. Robertson, Henry Robertson and F.A. Copus . 

The biography of our immediate Past Grand Master, R.E. 
Davies, states, in part, "An now at 45 years of age, becomes 
one of the youngest to be elected Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario" . This seems to be 
a very young age to be Grand Master. Such a position requires 
almost complete dedication of time and talents to make it 
successful and few young men can absent themselves from their 
work to devote themselves to the position. And, too, there is 
usually a long period of apprenticeship in lodge, and General 
Purposes Board of Grand Lodge. To be elected one must have 
served on many important committees. 

Yet R.E. Davies was not the youngest by any means. Five 
others were his juniors. The youngest of all was J.K. Kerr, 
who at age 34 completed the term of W.M. Wilson, when he passed 
away in 1875. He then went on to serve his own two year term. 
A. A. Stevenson, our only out-of-Ontario Grand Master, was 39 
when elected. Hugh Murray in 1884 was 41. Our first Grand 
Master in 1855 and E.T. Malone in 1898 were 44. From our 
calculation, the average age of all Grand Masters on assuming 
office was 55.5 years. On the other end of the scale, we find 
three who were 72 on reaching the apex of Masonry. They were 
J. A. Henderson, A.T. Freed and A.J. Anderson. Two others were 
71 and 70. 

The average age at death was 71.4 years. No fewer than 16 
passed their four score birthday. The eldest was A.T. Freed who 
died at 89. Next was W.S. Herrington at 87, while 24 lived to 
be over 75. The youngest to die was T.C. Wardley at age 54. 
In all five died before reaching age 60. At the time of writing, 
of the 59 Grand Masters, there are but nine still with us. 

In the early days of Grand Lodge, it was natural that many Grand 
Masters would have been immigrants from the British Isles. In 
more recent times that is the exception. Of our Grand Masters, 
eight were born in Scotland, four in Ireland and two in England. 
One, C.M. Pitts, was a native of New Brunswick. No other pro- 
vince or the United States has provided us with a leader. A. A. 
Stevenson, who resided in Montreal, was born in Scotland. 



It would seem from the records that many of our Grand 
Masters did not believe in single blessedness. At least 15 
were married twice and one, J.M. Gibson, was married thrice. 

For this study we are considering six additional Masonic 
bodies that are an integral part of our system. They are the 
Holy Royal Arch, the Royal and Select Masters, the Knights 
Templar, the Scottish Rite, the Royal Order of Scotland and 
the Red Cross of Constantine. There are no doubt others one 
might consider important but these seem to be the chief ones. 

We can find only four who seem to have belonged to Craft 
Masonry only. It may be that some of these went on but they 
are not recorded. The Royal Arch claimed 46 while the Scottish 
Rite had one fewer. Of course many belonged to both organi- 
zations. Many in the Scottish Rite became 33° Masons and 26 
joined the Royal Order. Four were members of the Red Cross of 
Constantine. This number seems small in comparison but it 
must be remembered that this order was revived in 1936. 26 
went on to join the Knights Templar with six becoming Royal and 
Select Masters. 

Besides presiding over Grand Lodge, eleven were Grand 
First Principals in the Royal Arch with four more as Honorary 
Grand First Principals. Eleven were Grand Masters of the Great 
Priory of the Knights Templar. Seven served as Sovereign Grand 
Commanders of the Sovereign Grand Consistory of the Scottish 
Rite. Two were Grand Sovereigns of the Red Cross of Constantine 
while five ruled over the Royal and Select Masters. 

Almost without exception our Grand Masters were leaders in 
civilian life. Ten were so prominent that they received honorary 
degrees at prominent universities, W.M. Wilson journeyed to 
Kentucky to be awarded an L.L.D. at the Universary of Kentucky. 
Sir John M. Gibson became a Knight with the title, K.C.M.G. 
He also received an honorary L.L.D. from his alma mater, the 
Universary of Toronto. R.T. Walkem was awarded a D.C.L. from 
Trinity College, Toronto. F.W. Harcourt was made an L.L.D. 
by Queen's University, Kingston. W.J. Dunlop was honored by 
three universities, Queen's, Assumption in Windsor and Ottawa. 
J. A. McRae, on his retirement from his professorship at Queen's 
University, was given an L.L.D. by that university. W.L. Wright 
was awarded a D.D. by Trinity College. R.W. Treleaven received 
a D.C.L. from McMaster University, Hamilton, and our present 
Grand Master, N.R. Richards, received a D.Sc. degree from Laval 
University. Finally, J.N. Allan was honored by McMaster 
University with an L.L.D. degree. 

It is pleasant to preside over an organization when it is 
growing, but might be quite disconcerting when it is receding. 
Only during two periods has Masonry in Ontario been in a slump 
as regards to numbers. For the first 77 years there was a 
steady growth from 1179 members in 1855 to 116, 166 in 1931. 
From then on during the great depression which lasted into the 
1940 's the membership dropped to 91, 798. The Craft was ruled 
over by A.J. Anderson, W.J. Dunlop, J. A. Dobbie and J. A. McRae 
during this period. Then in 1940 it began to climb again until 
in 1962 the membership stood at 126, 091. Since then it has 
dropped to our present record of 108, 848. Many feel that the 
slump has about ended and that we may soon see an upward trend. 



10 



Over the century and a quarter of the history of Masonry 
in this Province the Craft has prospered. Yet all could not 
be expected to go smoothly all the time. In fact, at the very 
beginning, Grand Lodge had a difficult time seeking recognition 
from the Grand Lodge of England and several Grand Lodges in the 
United States. It was due in large measure to the reputation 
and astuteness of William Mercer Wilson that matters progressed 
as well as they did. His stature was such that he was listened 
to. The difficulty with England and also with New York State 
was that the Provincial Grand Lodge of Upper Canada was in 
competition with the newly-formed Grand Lodge of Canada. In 
his first year Wilson travelled over 2000 miles within the 
Province and another 2000 miles to Kentucky and back on good- 
will missions. Finally all was settled amicably. 

Following the formation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, 
in two years time the Quebec brethren declared their indepen- 
dence and constituted the Grand Lodge of Quebec. A. A. Stevenson 
of Montreal was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada and 
he went on for a third term in an endeavour to bring about a 
solution to the difficulties that had arisen. He failed, 
however, and was followed in office by James Seymour who also 
failed in his attempt to bring matters to a fruitful conclusion. 
Then William Mercer Wilson was prevailed upon to once more take 
up the cause. In 1874 all was settled to everyone's satisfaction 

Wilson died early in 1875 and J.K. Kerr assumed office. 
He had a difficult problem to settle in London. Eden Lodge was 
given a dispensation under unusual circumstances. Grand Lodge 
did not uphold this and asked for its withdrawal. This resulted 
in the formation of the Grand Lodge of Ontario. This body 
operated spasmodically until 1884 when under Daniel Spry all was 
settled. 

W.N. Ponton had two thorny problems during his term of 
office. One, the idea of establishing a hospital-senior 
citizens home, as had been done in many jurisdictions, came up 
once more for discussion, but after due consideration it was 
decided to improve the benevolent fund and not to construct a 
home. Then came a demand for the recognition of The Mystic 
Order of the Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm, or 
commonly known as The Grotto. This Order required Masonic 
affiliation for its members. At the same time The Order of the 
Eastern Star was singled out for attention. Both orders were 
ruled to be beyond the confines of Masons in this jurisdiction. 
Both of these edicts brought much dissatisfaction. 

A furore arose in 1936 when Grand Master W.J. Dunlop 
created Rev. H.J. Cody, President of the University of Toronto, 
a Mason-at-Sight. Although there were plenty of precedents for 
this action, it was not universally accepted by the Masons of 
Ontario. 

Our Grand Lodge in 1980 celebrates its 125th anniversary. 
This is the fourth celebration that has taken place in this 
history of the Grand Lodge. The first occurred in 1905, the 
occasion of the 50th anniversary. Benjamin Allen was the Grand 
Master at the time. Two years previously under J.E. Harding a 
semi-centennial benevolent fund had been set up. It was hoped 



- 11 



that each member would contribute $1.00 a year for three years 
to this fund. By 1905, $21,000 had been raised. The income 
from this fund would be used in extreme cases of need. 

In 1930, at the time of the 75th anniversary, R.B. 
Dargard wa s Grand Master. Two years previously, under Grand 
Master J.S. Martin, a new fund, called the Memorial Fund, was 
set up. It was hoped that $250,000 would be raised but by 
1930 the fund stood at $330,000. Later the two benevolent funds 
were amalgamated and now have invested more than $672,000. A 
second project at that time was the preparation of a history 
under W.S. Herrington as author entitled A History of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario. 

In 1955, under W.L. Wright, Grand Lodge celebrated its 
centennial. The main events took place in Exhibition Park, 
Toronto. This was an impressive occasion. Grand Lodge took 
the occasion to bring Herrington' s history up to date. Roy 
Foley, of University Lodge, Toronto, took on this task. 

In preparation for the celebration of the 125th anniversary 
this year, a special fund was set up, known as H.E.L.P. and at 
the latest report over $900,000 had been donated by Ontario 
Masons and their friends. This fund was specially dedicated to 
studies in hearing losses. A second project was the preparation 
of a new history of Masonry in Ontario. This is entitled Whence 
Come We? and is now available. The 1980 celebrations were under 
the direction of our present Grand Master, N.R. Richards. 

Looking back, Masonry in Ontario has had a long and 
brilliant history and we may be proud of the 59 Grand Masters 
who have ruled over our beloved Craft. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

I would like to acknowledge the help given to me in the 
writing of this paper by my good friend and brother R.W.Bro. 
J.L. Runnalls, and to say how grateful I am for the patience, 
kindness and understanding shown to me by him at all times, and 
for the use of his extensive library. 

Finally, I express my appreciation to the Heritage Lodge 
for permitting me to present this work. 



W.Bro. George A. Campbell 



SOURCES 

PROCEEDINGS OF GRAND LODGE 
Runnalls OUR GRAND MASTERS 1855-1980 



CANADIAN MASONIC RESEARCH PAPERS; 3, 38, 53 
59, 63, 64, 65, 83, 95. 



Pearce OUR FIRST GRAND MASTER 



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Herrington and A HISTORY OF THE GRAND LODGE OF CANADA IN THE 
PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



Daily Newspapers OBITUARIES 



REVIEWS 



1. By W.Bro. Donald J. Thornton, I. P.M. of Ionic Lodge No. 

229, Brampton, and a member of The Heritage Lodge No. 7 30. 

W.Bro. George A. Campbell and R. W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls 
are to be commended for their efforts in presenting such an 
informative paper on "Our Grand Masters". It is difficult, I am 
sure, to present all the information one would like on this 
subject in the time and space available. Indeed, we could spend 
a whole evening discussing each of many of our Grand Masters. 

Reference is made early in the paper to the three Provincial 
Grand Masters who were appointed by the Grand Lodge of England 
(Ancients) without consultation with the Canadian brethren. 
This action seems typical of the attitude at that time of 
England toward her colonies. Such slogans as "taxation without 
representation" could also apply to Masonry in Upper Canada. 
It is quite obvious that these appointments were merely favours 
handed out to affluent gentlemen Masons who, perhaps had abil- 
ities to become great founders and leaders of the Craft; but, 
for unknown reasons did not have the incentive to succeed. 

The paper refers to our first Grand Master, William Mercer 
Wilson through whose leadership "brought order out of chaos" . 
Without Wilson, Masonry, as we know it in this part of Canada, 
may not have survived. I would like to recommend the book 
"Our First Grand Master", a biography of William Mercer Wilson. 
It is interesting to note that there is a Masonic District 
named after him which is located in the Norfolk, Oxford and 
Brant County area. 

This paper outlines various statistics about our 59 Grand 
Masters such as profession or occupation, political achievement, 
age while in office, age at death, origin, marital status, 
membership and achievement in other Masonic bodies, leadership 
in civilian life and honorary degrees from universities. 

One of these Grand Masters, John Ross Robertson, was founder 
of the now defunct Toronto Telegram, a Member of Parliament from 
East Toronto (1896 - 1900) , and a benefactor in the millions of 
dollars of the Hospital for Sick Children. Above all this he 
was a devout and dedicated Mason. For example, during his one 
year term as D.D.G.M. for the Toronto District he mad a total 
of 78 visits to the 35 lodges in his district covering 2,160 
miles. He was offered a Knighthood andSenatorship and declined 
both. 

Brothers Campbell and Runnalls give an account of the 
difficulties some of our Grand Masters had to encounter during 
their term of office. None was so great as that experienced by 
William Mercer Wilson who found that the newly formed Grand 
Lodge was not recognized by the Grand Lodge of England and 



13 



several Grand Lodges in the United States. With time this 
problem was settled amicably. Our Grand Masters in nearly all 
circumstances were able to overcome with time, most of the 
serious problems. This says much for the calibre of leadership 
of our Grand Masters. 

This paper refers to the various anniversaries and 
achievements of Grand Lodge during the first 125 years. Details 
of various benevolent fund projects are given including our own 
125th Anniversary project, H.E.L.P. Our Grand Masters have 
given us the opportunity to demonstrate our true Masonic Charity, 

In the same mail that I received my invitation to make 
this review, I received my copy of "Whence Come We?". By 
revieweing such an excellent paper and referring to "Whence Come 
We?" as back up material, I have gained a wealth of Masonic 
Heritage. I am grateful to Rt. Wor . Bro. Frank J. Bruce, 
Program Chairman for this opportunity. 

W.Bro. D.J. Thornton 

2. By R. W.Bro. Joel C. Piper, P.D.D.G.M. Wilson District. 

In Appreciation 

As we have joined together on so many occasions in this 
great Province to celebrate the 125th birthday of this Grand 
Lodge, the subject of "Our Grand Masters" is both timely and 
appropriate. Gratitude for the preparation of this paper is 
due to W.Bro. Campbell and R. W.Bro. Runnalls. 

About the Subject - A Point of View 

As I see it, our Grand Masters over the years have been 
men of great vision and certainly of purpose for as each has 
served his term of office it leaves to say that you and I can 
partake of the privilege of masonry as it exists in the 
Province today. 

If you will - the choice of avocation among "the 59" who 
have served this high office be it farmer, teacher, doctor, 
lawyer, politician, merchant or businessmen - because success 
has been achieved, these brethren have found still more to 
give. This in mind, a common denominator stands out namely: 
a full and complete dedication of time and talent to the 
responsibility of such office. 

Our Grand Masters have maintained and passed on those 
great landmarks and through their leadership have motivated 
each of us to place a high importance to the principles upon 
which we stand. More, now then if ever, the outside world 
needs our message - for it is the key to our future. Our Rules 
of this Craft have been advocating all of us to display mentally, 
spiritually and morally, a life style that is to attract young 
men in this rapidly changing society. Brethren, my view is that 
those "59" have come to serve such high office with the quali- 
fications and expertise to do just that. 

Over the pages of time, with the endorsement of membership, 



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benevolence, scholastic assistance, and more recently our pro- 
ject H.E.L.P., is proof of the vision and purpose that our 
leaders have possessed. 

I am convinced that those who in their time have served 
that high office have been the best among us and quote what 
has been said "A Premiere Grand Lodge" of which we can all be 
proud as we look ahead to the next 125 years. 

R.W.Bro. Joel C. Piper 

3. By R.W.Bro. A.N. Newell, P.G.S.W., Brant District. 
Read by R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce 

To summarize the qualities, abilities, characteristics and 
contributions of 59 Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge of Canada 
and the Province of Ontario is a very difficult task. 

W.Bro. Campbell and R.W.Bro. Runnalls have given us an 
overview of our Grand Master's in the paper under discussion. 

The preamble discusses briefly the events leading up to 
the formation of our Grand Lodge. A reference is made to the 
address of Worshipful Master Wilson to the initial Annual 
Communication. This is recorded in "A History of the Grand 
Lodge Etc". (Herrington & Foley pp. 36-43) and should be read 
by every member of the Craft. There are short notes on our 
First Grand Master. 

The Authors next discuss the Grand Masters as a group, 
classifying them according to various categories, such as term 
of office, origin, occupation, age, civil honours and several 
others. 

There is usually reference made to a particular unique 
problem that had to be solved or which caused consternation 
among the Brethren during their particular term of office. 

The four main celebrations in our history are also noted, 
namely the 50th Anniversary with the establishment of the 
Benevolent Fund and the 75th Anniversary with the establishment 
of the Memorial Fund. These funds were subsequently amalgamated 
to form a combined fund. 

The 100th Anniversary was celebrated by updating the 
History of Grand Lodge and our 125th Anniversary was marked by 
the very successful H.E.L.P. Project and the publishing of 
"Whence Come We". 

Whence Come We, has a great deal of information regarding 
our Grand Masters and is also commended for the information 
presented in it. 

The Authors have attempted to give an overview of our 
Masonic Forefathers which is rather difficult in such a short 
paper. They have presented the information in a classification 
which shows that this unique group of men from varying back- 
grounds have in common proven ability in their chosen field, 
side involvement in many community activities, strong support 



15 



for their particular church and obviously a deep concern and 
love for our Fraternity. 

The Authors are to be commended and if any one feels the 
subject is treated superficially, adequate references are given 
for further reading. 

R.W.Bro. A.N. Newell 

4. By Bro. Len Hirst, S.D. of Birchcliffe Lodge No. 612. The 
review was read by R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce. 

W.Bro. Campbell and R.W.Bro. Runnalls are to be commended 
for tackling such a task as a presentation paper on "Our Grand 
Masters - 1855-1980". It is a task that could almost be called 
"Mission Impossible" . 

Anyone who has read "The First One Hundred Years, A History 
of The Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario, 1855-1955", will no doubt know that it took M. W.Bro. 
Walter Harrington and V. W.Bro. Foy Foley almost four hundred 
pages to tell that history. W.Bro. George Campbell and R.W. 
Bro. Runnalls have attempted to relate the history of fifty- 
nine Grand Masters in a twelve page presentation. 

It is obvious to all who have read it and to those who have 
listened to the presentation that a tremendous amount of research 
and a great deal of time and effort have gone into this paper. 
However, it is my opinion that the Authors have failed to 
relate the findings of this research. The paper tends to make 
one feel as though he is trying to absorb the telephone direc- 
tory, with names and dates. 

The Authors have informed us of the number of Grand Masters 
associated with law, medicine, teaching and so on; I feel that 
had they given a little thought to the fact that all of these 
worthy brethren were Masons and that the presentation was pre- 
pared for Masons, they would have endeavoured to give a more 
detailed report on their Masonic achievements. I feel that 
their name, profession, age and years in office should have 
been followed by what they had achieved while in office. What 
problems did they have to overcome? What were they most 
remembered for? How many Rulings did they make while in office? 
What, if any, was the most controversial Ruling? And any other 
findings that relate to their Masonic Careers. 

Unfortunately this presentation tends to be a dusty 
chronicle of facts and figures, and I say unfortunately 
because it is obvious that a great deal of work has gone into 
it. 

Finally, I hope that the Authors will not let my comments 
deter them from submitting further presentations in the future 
and that they will take my criticism as being constructive. 

Bro. L. Hirst 



16 



INFORMATION DISCUSSION 



Following the formal reviews, R.W.Bro. Bruce then invited 
the Brethren to participate in the discussions. 

R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley commented that he had recently 
borrowed a copy of the book "OUR GRAND MASTERS - 1855-1980" 
from the Grand Lodge Library in Toronto and that it must have 
contained over 400 pages with a full page picture of each of 
the 59 Grand Masters accompanied by a great deal of factual 
information. 

Another Brethren stated that it was his understanding that 
one of the Grand Masters, on his initial application to masonry, 
was not accepted at the time of balloting. He inquired if any 
other Grand Masters had been refused admission to the Craft. 

R.W.Bro. Bruce then called on R.W.Bro. Runnalls to present 
a summary of the discussions. 



SUMMARY 

R.W.Bro. Runnalls, speaking on behalf of W.Bro. Campbell 
and himself, thanked W.Bro. Thornton, R.W.Bros. Newell and 
Piper, and Bro. Hirst for their written evaluation and comments 
of the paper as presented and also the Brethren who participated 
in the informal discussion. 

In the main, the paper seems to have been well received. 
However, Bro. Hirst has made a few observations that need some 
explanation. 

This paper has been a review of a recently completed book 
on "OUR GRAND MASTERS - 1855-1980" by R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence 
Runnalls. R.W.Bro. Runnalls did not consider himself the 
Author, but merely the compiler of information which activity 
covered a span of some 30 years. He tried to record what had 
been said about each Grand Master as contained in the Proceedings 
of Grand Lodge. This consisted of biographies, especially after 
1941, and the reports by the Grand Masters and the Committees 
on the Fraternal Dead at the time of the death of each. The 
librarian of the St. Catharines Public Library co-operated in 
seeking out the obituaries contained in the news papers over 
more than a century. This gave two views, from a Masonic point 
of view and that of a layman. However, in no case did it 
touch upon the difficulties and accomplishments of each. 

When asked to review this book, we found no other suitable 
way to deal with it, and we trust that it will be accepted in 
this light. 

As suggested, the field is now wide open for others to deal 
with specific aspects of the life and accomplishments of our 
Grand Masters. 

In concluding his remarks, R.W.Bro. Runnalls stated that 
only nine copies of his book had been reproduced and bound. 
Copies have already been presented to the Grand Master, Grand 



17 



Secretary, Grand Lodge Library, W. Master of Maple Leaf Lodge, 
No. 103, P. Master of Temple Lodge, No. 296 and P. Master of 
Seymour Lodge, No. 277, and that this was the first opportunity 
to present a copy to The Heritage Lodge. 

The Book was presented to the Worshipful Master who in 
turn presented it to W.Bro. Rev. Rivers, Chairman of the Lodge 
Library Committee. 

V. W.Bro. Pos, in thanking the Authors, Reviewers and 
Participants, reminded the Brethren that irregardless of one's 
station in life or age of maturity, the history of our Grand 
Masters has shown that all of us have the potential to make a 
significant contribution to the Craft if we will but accept the 
challenge and apply our resources. He also thanked R. W.Bro. 
Bruce for assembling and organizing an excellent program for 
the evening. 

Before returning the meeting to the care of the Worshipful 
Master, R. W.Bro. Bruce extended an invitation to all Brethren 
who may be interested in Masonic Research or who may wish to 
prepare a paper for a future presentation to get in touch with 
him as soon as convenient. He also mentioned that there would 
not be a paper for the next Regular Meeting, as this was the 
Annual Installation and Investiture of the Worshipful Master and 
Lodge Officers. 

The Lodge was called off for the space of 10 minutes and 
re-convened at 9:25 to conclude the regular business of the 
Lodge . 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Emerick, seconded by 
W.Bro. Zwicker, that the minutes of the Thirteenth Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge, held on May 21st, 1980, be adopted as 
circulated in the Lodge Proceedings (Vol. 3, No. 4). Motion 
carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The reports of the Committees on Applications (25) for 
Affiliation as listed on pages 5, 6 and 7 of the last Lodge 
Proceedings (Vol. 3, No. 4), dated May 1980, all reported 
favourable . 

MOTION Re: Reports of Committees on Petitions 

I was regularly moved by V. W.Bro. Randall Langs and 
seconded by R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, that the reports be 
received, the committees discharged and proper notice for 
balloting at the next Regular Meeting of the Lodge be included 
in the Lodge Summons. Motion carried. 



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CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From W.Bro. Frank Gordon Simm, P.M. of Electric Lodge No. 
495, Hamilton, requesting a demit. W.Bro. Simm is a 
member in good standing. 

2. From the Secretary/Treasurer of the Worshipful Masters' 
Past Masters ' and Wardens ' Association of Waterloo District 
including: - Minutes of May 29th, 1980 meeting 

- 1980/81 inter-lodge visitation schedule 
Preston Lodge No. 297 is to visit us. We 
are to visit Wilmot Lodge No. 318. 

- Agenda for the October 30th meeting. 

3. From W.Bro. W.B. Miller, Secretary for Waterloo District 
which included a limited number of copies of the Waterloo 
District Trestle for R. W.Bro. Talbot L. Peyton. We were 
required to pay 80C duty for insufficient postage. 

4. From the Office of the Grand Secretary, re: our request for 
permission to obtain the documentary film on the Instal- 
lation of the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Australia. 
We now have the address of The Masonic Services Association 
in Maryland, U.S.A., who may be able to procure the film 
for us . 

5. From the Office of the Grand Secretary, re: special dis- 
pensation for a new procedure to process applications for 
affiliation to The Heritage Lodge No. 730. (to be discussed 
in General Business) 

6. From the Grand Secretary, M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies re: 
Publication of a Masonic Bulletin - "The Lodge Historian" 

Dear Bro. Pos : 

"In response to your letter of August 8, 1980, I would 
advise that you do not require the approval of Grand Lodge to 
print the above captioned Bulletin. However, it is suggested 
you check with the Chairman of the Committee on Masonic 
Education first before printing this item" . 

Robert D. Davies 
Aug. 20, 1980 Grand Secretary 

7. From W.Bro. Glenson T. Jones of Ottawa, and a member of 
The Heritage Lodge, as a follow up to a gift of two copies 

(Nos. 3 and 4) of a Catalogue of The Masonic Collection of 
A.J.B. Milborne, as housed in the Public Archives, Ottawa, 
Canada. 

8. From R. W.Bro. Hartley Thompson, announcing a Lodge of 
Instruction for Installing Masters to be held on Wednesday 
September 10, 1980, at 8:00 p.m. in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple. 



19 - 



9. From Dominion Regalin Limited, enclosing a new price list 
of increased costs effective immediately. 

10. A number of letters were received from: 

V.W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown 
Bro. William Bolton 

W.Bro. R. Forest-Jones 

W.Bro. Terrance J. Thorn 
R. W.Bro. Wm. Lowe 

W.Bro. E.C. Gerhart 

with corrections to the last Lodge Proceedings. 

MOTION Re: Correspondence 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Zwicker and seconded by 
W.Bro. Boratynec, that the correspondence be received and 

processed in the usual manner. Motion carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $67.19 were presented, 
and on a motion by R. W.Bro. Frank Bruce and W.Bro. Paul Engel 
were passed and ordered paid: 

Secretary's Account 

- Rubber deposit stamp Inv. #246 $ 8.83 

- Postage due (Waterloo District) .80 
C. Waddington and Son Ltd. 

- Engraving Officers Collars Inv. #19 44.56 
W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman 

- Refreshments for Sept. meeting 13 . 00 

TOTAL $67.19 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for affiliation were received as follows: 

1. COSENS, Donald L., P.M.; 13 Margaret St., St. Thomas; 
Age 45; Deputy Registrar of Deeds; member of St. Davids 
Lodge No. 302, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. G. Robert 
Jackson and W.Bro. Leverne Ferguson. 

2. BRANDRIDGE, Laurie, P.G.S.; Box 26, 190 Centre St., Beeton 
Age 72; Retired; member of Spry Lodge No. 385, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R. W.Bro. Ed. Ralph and W.Bro. James Robson. 

3. PENROSE, Frederick W. , P.M.; 110 Norton Ave., Willowdale; 
Age 66; Retired; member of Patterson Lodge No. 265, G.R.C.. 
recommended by R. W.Bro. Thomas G. Roberts and W.Bro. Harry 
J. Dowsett. 

4. GABRIELLE, Denis Michael Stephen, M.M.; 9 Easton Court, 
Ajax; Age 30; Physician; member of Doric Lodge No. 424, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew and V.W.Bro. 
Jack Pos. 



20 



5. GIVEN, George Laurie, W.M. ; 12 Wildwood Place, Waterloo; 
Age 60; Sales; member of Temple Lodge No. 690, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod and R.W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley. 

6. WATSON, John, W.M. ; 94 Glasgow St., Kitchener; Age 53; 
Maintenance; member of Brotherhood Lodge No. 723, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod and R.W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley. 

7. JOYCE, Edwin Frank, P.M.; 171 Keslop Rd . , Milton; Age 53; 
Manager; member of St. Clair Lodge No. 135, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson and V.W.Bro. Robert 
McMaster . 

8. McNEIL, William Leonard, P.M., 403 Campbell Ave., Milton; 
Age 67; Retired School Superintendent; member of St. Clair 
Lodge No. 135, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 
and V.W.Bro. Robert McMaster. 

9. ANDREWS, Leonard E. , G.S.; 105 Campbell Ave. W. , 

Campbellville; Age 60; Stock Broker; member of Campbell 
Lodge No. 60 3, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W.Bro. W. Robert 
Lawson and V.W.Bro. Robert McMaster. 

10. KINNEE, Morley John, P.G.S.W.; 40 Baif Blvd., Richmond 
Hill; Age 78; Retired; member of Vaughan Lodge No. 54, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod and 
R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

11. FAST, Allyn Ralph, P.M.; 12 Wintemute St., Fort Erie; 

Age 64; Electrician; member of Palmer Lodge No. 372, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Wm. Lowe and R.W.Bro. John M. 
Plyley . 

12. RIVERS, Raymond Pritchard, M.M. ; 664 Lundys Lane, 
Peterborough; Age 71; Retired; member of J.B. Hall Lodge 
No. 145, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers 
and R.W.Bro. F. Harland Seens . 

13. SCOTT, Walter Gifford, P.M.; 6075 Summer St., Niagara 
Falls; Age 69; Retired; member of Stanford Lodge No. 626, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Wm. Lowe and R.W.Bro. 
C.A. Sankey. 

14. SEFTON, James William, M.M. ; 4 Hughson Dr., Box 5, R.R.#1 
Unionville; Age 65; Retired; member of Markham Union Lodge 
No. 87, G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. Wm. B. Bolton and 
R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph. 

15. HOGG, John Henry, M.M.; 201-1500 Merivale Rd., Nepean; 
Age 58; Owner Insurance Agency; member of Ancient St. John 
Lodge No. 3, G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. Wm. B. Bolton and 
R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph. 

16. WILHELM, Allan E., P.M.; R.R.#1, New Hamburg; Age 62; 
Farming; member of New Dominion Lodge No. 205, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. H.C. Wolfe and Bro. Earl W. Gillespie, 



- 21 



17. MARR, George A., P.G.S.; 43 Oregon Rd . , Sault Ste. Marie; 
Age 54; Pharmacist; member of Algoma Lodge No. 469, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn and Bro . Wm. B. 
Bolton. 

18. HAM, James Alan, P.M.; 720 Highland Ave., Ottawa; Age 57; 
Civil Servant; member of Fidelity Lodge No. 231, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. Wm. B. Bolton and V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

19. FLETCHER, David Gordon, M.M. ; 8-126 Tollgate Rd., Brantford; 
Age 43; High School Teacher; member of Ozias Lodge No. 508, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Clare Parsons and R.W.Bro. 
Donald Grinton. 

20. JOHNSON, James F., P.M.; 75 Emmett Ave., Apt. #711, Toronto; 
Age 61; Retired; member of University Lodge No. 496, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph and V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

21. RHODES, Albert Edward, M.M. ; 362 Blair Rd., Cambridge; 
Age 63; Supervisor; member of Gait Lodge No. 257, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer and W.Bro. Wm. E. 
Westbrook. 

22. AMIS, David Sidney, W.M.; 151 Wolton Ave. S., Hamilton; 
Age 32; Sales Representative; member of The Barton Lodge 
No. 6, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy and 
R.W.Bro. Duncan J. McFadgen. 

23. WILKER, Gordon Henry, G.O.; Box 325 New Hamburg; Age 80; 
Retired; member of New Dominion Lodge No. 205; G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. J. Kenneth Marty and Bro. Earl W. 
Gillespie. 

24. PELLOW, William Russel, P.D.D.G.M.; 1678 Louise Blvd., 
London; Age 50; Dental Surgeon; member of Ionic Lodge No. 
716, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson and 
R.W.Bro. Donald J. Emerick. 

25. GILLIS, Kenneth S., E.A.; R.R.#2 Atwood; Age 62; member of 
Elma Lodge No. 456, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Keith 
Flynn and V.W.Bro. Randall Langs. 

MOTION Re: Petitions for Affiliation 

It was regularly moved by V.W.Bro. J. Pos, seconded by 
V.W.Bro. R. Langs, that the Petition for Affiliation be 
received, the usual committees appointed, and the names and 
required particulars of the Applicants published in the next 
Lodge Summons. Motion carried. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

W.Bro. Donald Kaufman, acting on behalf of R.W.Bro. Ron 
Groshaw, reported that copies of the complete minutes of the 
August 20th meeting of Lodge Committee on General Purposes were 
available in the Anti-room and suggested that everyone obtain 
one if they didn't already have one. He then briefly outlined 
some of the highlights. 



22 - 



MOTION Re: Annual Dues and Life Membership 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Kaufman, seconded by 
W.Bro. Moffat that the Report of the General Purpose Committee 
be accepted as written. Motion carried. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

R. W.Bro. W.E.C. Wilson, reminded the Brethren of his 
notice of motion, of the last meeting, as it appeared in the 
Lodge Summons/Proceedings, page 15, Vol. 3, No. 4, and that at 
this time he would formerly present the complete motion. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Ed. Wilson, seconded by 
R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, that: 

(a) paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 of Article XII of the by-laws be 
deleted in t.".ieir entirety and the following substituted in 
their stead: 

INITIATION 

1. The fee for initiation shall be $500.00 which shall 
include the Grand Lodge Fee for registration and 
certificate, and a Master Mason's apron. 

AFFILIATION 

2. The fee for affiliation shall be $15.00 and shall 
accompany the application for affiliation. 

ANNUAL DUES 

3. The annual dues for each member shall be $15.00 
payable in advance. The annual dues shall be pro-rated 
on the basis of $1.50 for each month remaining from 
the date of membership into the Lodge until the 
following September 1st, to a maximum of $15. 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP 

4. In lieu of annual dues, a member may elect to become 
a Life Member by making a one lump-sum payment to the 
Lodge. This lump-sum payment shall be in accordance 
with the terms of Appendix A of these by-laws. 

(b) that the following be added to Article XVI of the by-laws: 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 

7. All monies received in payment of Life Membership shall 
be deposited in a separate account known as the Life 
Membership Account, and invested from time to time in 
Charter Bank or Trust Company Certificates, or similar 
securities . 



23 - 



8. The Fund shall be administered by the Committee of 

General Purposes, which shall ensure that the interest 
from the invested sum shall be transferred to the 
Operating Fund from time to time, and that no 
encroachment on the principal amount shall take place 
except in accordance with the terms of Appendix A of 
these by-laws. 

(c) that the first and second sentences of paragraph 1 of 
Article XVI be changed to read: 

There shall be three funds maintained in the name of 
the Lodge, in a Chartered Bank or Trust Company as 
approved by the Lodge. The Funds shall be known as 
(a) The Operating Fund, (b) The Capital Fund, and 
(c) The Life Membership Fund. 



APPENDIX A Sept. 17, 1980 

ADMINISTRATION OF A LIFE MEMBERSHIP PLAN 
FOR THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 



General 

Basically, the concept of Life Membership is very simple. 
In lieu of annual dues, the Life Member pays to the Lodge one 
lump-sum which thereafter exempts him from any further payments 
during his lifetime. Out of this lump-sum the Lodge pays any 
incidental expenses and invests the remainder in interest- 
bearing securities, the income from which pays, in effect, 
annual dues on his behalf. 

The amount to be invested may be se.t at a figure which 
will require a small amount of the principal to be used with 
the earned interest to equal the annual operating expenses, 
or may be set at a value sufficient to pay -such expense from 
interest alone, without encroaching on the. principal at any 
time. In the former case the principal will diminish annually, 
reaching zero at some time in the future, say age 75. In the 
latter case, the principal will remain at full value indef- 
initely, that is, it will be self-sustaining, and will be the 
same for all members regardless of age. It is this plan to 
which The Heritage Lodge subscribes. 

In a self-sustaining plan the amount to be invested is 
determined by the following formula: 

p _ 100 M 



where P = principal amount to be invested 

M = annual dues or annual operating expense per member 
I = prevailing or expected interest rate, or return on 
the investment, in percent. 



24 



Life Membership Fee 

The current annual dues for this Lodge are $15.00 payable 
in advance, and the required principal amount is therefore: 

P = 10 ° ^ 15 - 00 = $150.00 

assuming an expected interest rate of 10%. To this must be 
added the incidental expenses, which in this Lodge are: 

Grand Lodge commutation fee $25.00 

Affiliation Fee (to Capital Fund)... 15.00 
First year's dues in advance 15 .00 

Total Expenses $55.00 

Therefore, the total cost of a Life Membership in The 
Heritage Lodge No. 730 is: 

$150.00 plus $55.00 or $205.00 for the year 1981. 

Administration 

1. Interest earned by the invested amount shall be deposited 
in the Life Membership Account as received. The income' only 
from this account shall be transferred to the Operating Account 
as required. This shall be done by cheque, signed by the 
regular signing officers of the Lodge. 

2. Except as required for investment as described in Article 
XVI, paragraphs 7 and 8, no portion of the principal amount of 
the Life Membership Fund shall be withdrawn without a notice 
of the proposed withdrawal having been given in a Lodge 
summons and without a 2/3 majority vote of the members present 
and voting at the next regular meeting of the Lodge. 

3. No fee, in whole or in part, may be returned to a brother 
or to his estate for any reason, including demission, suspension, 
expulsion or death. 

4. The Life Membership Fund shall be reviewed annually by the 
Committee of General Purposes. If at any time the annual dues 
of the Lodge or the annual operating expenses are changed, the 
Life Membership fee charged to subsequently joining members 
shall be altered accordingly. 

5. All bonds, certificates and other securities relating to 
the Life Membership Fund shall be kept in a safe deposit box 
approved by the Lodge, and shall be made available to those 
auditors at any time. 

There was considerable discussion on the purpose of Life 
Memberships as well as the administrative procedure. R.W.Bro. 
Curtis stated the main purpose is to prepay membership dues. 
Others felt it eliminated the embarresment of forgetting to 
make the annual payment particularly when a member belongs to 
several organization with different fiscal years. It was also 



- 25 - 

stated that Life Memberships do help to reduce the number of 
demits in a lodge. There was some concern that in future years 
it may be the annual dues paying members who would have to 
carry the Lodge with the current rate of inflation. R.W.Bro. 
Wilson assured the Brethren that, the agenda Members would not 
be penalized since it is the responsibility of the Committee of 
General Purposes to review the financial structure annually and 
adjust the Life Membership Fee accordingly. 

The motion was passed by a 70% majority. 

MOTION Re: New application form for affiliation 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. David Bradley, seconded 
by W.Bro. Wm. Boratynec, that the Lodge approve the new 
application form and procedure for processing of applications 
for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., by 
affiliation only. 

R.W.Bro. Bradley, by way of explanation, went on to say 
"This simply means that we use the same type of application 
form (Form #7, page 172) as specified in the new Constitution, 
but adding three more spaces to accommodate three additional 
signatures of supporting masons, who need not necessarily be 
members of The Heritage Lodge. This procedure would take the 
place of appointing an investigation committee for masons 
wishing to become members of The Heritage Lodge by affiliation. 

The motion was passed. 

MOTION Re: Printing new Application Forms 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and 
seconded by W.Bro. Don Thornton, that, subject to the approval 
of Grand Lodge for the use of the proposed new forms for 
affiliation, the Secretary be authorized to order the printing 
of 1000 copies as soon as possible. Motion carried. 

BALLOTING 

It was regularly moved by V. W.Bro. Randall Langs, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. Ed. Wilson, that the ballot be taken collectively. 
Motion carried. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applications, the 
Worshipful Master declared the following Brethren eligible for 
membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, by affiliation, and 
requested that each new member affix his signature in the Lodge 
Register at his earliest convenience in token of submission to 
the Lodge By-Laws : 

R.W.Bros. Edward Sidney Patrick Carson, Wilbur J. Dickinson, 
Charles Russell Harris; 

V.W.Bros. Harold S. Anderson, Frank William Chisholm; 

W.Bros. Lancelot Francis Buttler, Barry Allan Douglas, Charles 
Raymond Griffiths, Thomas Henderson, Jerry Michael Howarth, 
Donald Ion, Donald Ross Moore, Maurice William George O'Neill, 
Stanley Lloyd Tonkin, Reginald Forest-Jones; 



26 - 



Bros. Roy Dawson Gilder, Robert FitzGerald Gordon, Perry Rupert 
Harrison, John Leonard Herron, James R. Hunter, Paul Liscumb, 
Malcolm John McKissack, Thomas Wilbert Piatt, Thomas Ross Silk, 
David Peter Stanton and Russell John Varley. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

The Worshipful Master called on V.W.Bro. Laurie Brandridge 
of Spry Lodge No. 385 and Bro. Hugh McLeod of Cedar Lodge No. 
270, to act as Scrutineers. 

Following the. election by written ballot and after thanking 
the Brethren who had assisted as Scrutineers, the Worshipful 
Master declared the following Brethren as Officers Elect for 
their respective offices for the ensuing masonic year: 

R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, W.M. - Elect 

W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, S.W. - Elect 

R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresely, J.W. - Elect 

V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos, Secretary - Elect 

R.W.Bro. Gary J. Powell , Treasurer - Elect 

ELECTION OF TYLER 

The Worshipful Master called for nominations for the 
office of Tyler and for the positions of Auditor. 

R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley nominated R.W.Bro. Charles F. 
Grimwood. On a motion by W.Bro. George Zwicker and W.Bro. Rev. 
Gray Rivers, nominations were closed and the W.M. declared R.W. 
Bro. Charles F. Grimwood, Tyler - Elect for the ensuing masonic 
year. 

With a change in location of the residence of the 
Treasurer, by virtue of a new Treasurer - Elect, it was thought 
advisable to defer the election of Auditors until such time as 
new candidates may be found in the Guelph area. 

FOR THE GOOD OF MASONRY 

The following Brethren reported as follows: 

R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

- This evening R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod, will have been 
made a Mark Master Mason. 

- Several Grand Lodge books could be purchased from him 
following the meeting. 

V.W.Bro. Randall Langs 

- Brant District Reception for M. W.Bro. N.R. Richards, 
Grand Master, Burford Fair Grounds, October 29, 1980, 
Social hour 6:00 p.m., dinner 7:15 p.m. 

W.Bro. R. Forest Jones 

- Volunteered his services as the Lodge Representative for 
Eastern District, until such time as some one from that 
District becomes available. 



27 - 



V.W.Bro. Laurie Brandridge 

- Volunteered his services as the Lodge Representative for 
Georgian District. 

- Georgian District Reception for M.W.Bro. N.R. Richards, 
Grand Master, October 4, 1980, Social at 6:00 p.m., 
Dinner at 7:00 p.m. Tickets - $10. 

W.Bro. H.G. Edgar 

- R. W.Bro. G. Ivor Davies is resting comfortably at Myrtle 
Beach, recovering from a heart attack. 

- W.Bro. John Brittain is now at home recovering from a 
short visit to the hospital. 

Following the invitation from the Junior Warden to enjoy 
a social period with refreshments in the banquet hall, the 
Lodge was closed in harmony at 10:55 p.m. 

J. Pos, Secretary 



IN MEMORIUM 

W.Bro. Henry Fishcarrier 

W.M. Hiram Lodge No. 319; 

Affiliated with The Heritage Lodge No. 730 

Passed to the Grand Lodge above, 
July 28, 1980 

We cherish his memory in our hearts. 



Corrections to Lodge Proceedings Vol. 03, No. 04. 

Page 12 

Please note the comment from V.W.Bro. Ernest Brown should 
have read - "even if a 'Lewis' were accepted as an E.A. before 
he was twenty-one years of age, he would have to wait until he 
was twenty-one before being passed or raised" . 

FRATERNAL VISIT TO OCCIDENT LODGE NO. 34 6 

On September 2nd, 1980, a large number of Masons of The 
Heritage Lodge made a Fraternal visit to Occident Lodge No. 
346. The Brethren were received in the traditional manner by 
W.Bro. John Boersma, Worshipful Master of Occident Lodge, who 
extended a sincere welcome and then invited R. W.Bro. Donald 
Grinton, Worshipful Master of The Heritage Lodge, to assume 
the gavel . 

R. W.Bro. Grinton, after extending fraternal greetings, 
introduced the officers and members who would be participating 
in the work of the evening and then called on W.Bro. Rev. Gray 
Rivers to attend the Altar. 



28 



At The Altar 

The Lodge being open in the Fellowcraft Degree, W.Bro. 
Rivers proceeded with the service: 

When the children of Israel finally made the break from 
their Egyptian Bondage they soon found themselves in a serious 
predicament; the Red Sea lay ahead and Pharoahs armies were 
rearing down upon them from behind. What to do? EXOD. 14: 15: 
"The Lord said to Moses, 'Tell the people of Israel to go 
forward"'. It had to be a step of faith! 

The 2nd degree in Masonry is, for the candidate, similarly 
a step of faith. But when taken in that spirit how miraculously 
does God open the way to new adventures and discovery. May he 
be with us again this night as we share that "step of faith" 
with another of our recently initiated brethren. 

Let Us Pray 

Supreme Architect of Heaven, into whose hand we all can 
commit ourselves with confidence, grant us the fortitude to 
trust thee in all aspects of our lives. May we all, like the 
candidate of this hour, accept the challenge of each new day, 
and each new experience of life, to heed the instruction of Thee, 
our God, to go forward - aware that Thou art with us, and that 
there is also a great throng of others around us who are always 
ready to steady us and support us if we should faulter or 
flounder on the way. For such is the brotherhood of Masonry! 
Amem. 

SO MOTE IT BE 

The Second-Degree was exemplified by the Officers and 
Members of The Heritage Lodge, following which R. W.Bro. Grinton 
returned the gavel to W.Bro. Boersma, who thanked the Brethren 
for the fine degree and also the Choir whose music added greatly 
to the work of the evening. 

Presentation 

At this time W.Bro. Boersma called on R. W.Bro. Wallace 
McLeod; Member of the Board of General Purposes and Chairman of 
the Grand Lodge Committee on Masonic Education who presented a 
personalized copy of the new Masonic book "Whence Come We" to 
R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos for their 
contribution in its publication. 

Following several announcements, the Lodge was closed and 
the Brethren adjourned to the Banquet Hall for an hour of 
refreshment and fellowship which was highlighted by an address 
from R. W.Bro. Wallace McLeod; Re: Quatuor Coronate Lodge No. 
2076, London, England. (This address will be reproduced in the 
next Lodge Proceedings) . 



29 - 



COMING EVENTS 

OCTOBER 15, 1980 (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee in 
the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, at 7:30 p.m. See 
this Summons for details. 

OCTOBER 24, 1980 (Friday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast of 

Wellington District, will be visiting Niagara Lodge No. 2, 
Niagara-on-the-Lake, to dramatize in full costume of the 
period, a typical 18th Century Lodge Meeting and Initiation 
Ceremony. Please note the change of date from previous 
Lodge Summons . 

OCTOBER 30, 1980 (Thursday) - The Fall Meeting of the Worshipful 
Master ' s, Past Master's and Warden's Association of Waterloo 
District will meet in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple 
at 8:00 p.m. hosted by Cambridge Lodge No. 728. 

NOVEMBER 18, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge, Annual Installation of the Worshipful Master and 
the Investiture of the Officers, and the Official Visit of 
R.W.Bro. Talbot L. Peyton, District Deputy Grand Master of 
Waterloo District. There will be no masonic paper pre- 
sented at this meeting. 

Masonic Papers to be presented at future meetings include: 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge; for 
example: Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, 
Rosicrucians, Prince Hall Masons, etc. 

2. Women Freemasons in Ontario, by R.W.Bro. Lawrence Runnalls. 

3. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodges 
formerly on the Register and now struck off, by Bro . John 
E. Taylor. 

4. Masonic Research Lodges - An Up-To-Date Review. 

5. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian 
Chief by V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

6. Anti-Masonic Groups - Individual. Political. Ecclesiastical 
etc., suggested by R.W.Bro. E.J. Burns Anderson. 

7. Important Masons of the First Provincial Grand Lodge in 
Canada, 1792-1822, by W.Bro. Robert Butler. 

8. Lodge Tracing Boards - An illustrated presentation and 
discussion of the symbolism. If anyone has knowledge of 
unique and interesting tracing boards, please bring it to 
the attention of V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

Anyone wishing to do research or present a masonic paper 
for The Heritage Lodge, or anyone wishing to make suggestions 
for topics for future Masonic Papers, please get in touch with 
R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, Chairman of the Committee on Masonic 
Information. 



30 



MASONIC INFORMATION IN THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES 

The following information was received by R.W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley from the Social/Cultural Archives section of the 
Public Archives, Ottawa, listing references to sources of 
masonic information available: 

a) A.J.B. Milbourne papers (MG 24 L 15) . Perhaps the most 
important collection of Masonic material we have. Mr. 
Milbourne was active in Masonic affairs and an enthusi- 
astic historian of the Order. Our Library has a large 
collection of books on the Masons placed by Mr. Milbourne. 

b) Information on the Masonic Fraternity, Brome County, Quebec 
in the Stone Family papers (MG 24 D 16) . 

c) Information on the Masonic Hall Association, Hamilton, 
Ontario 1871 in the Buchanan papers (MG 24 D 16) . 

d) A certificate of admission (1760) into the order of 
Freemasons on board the HMS Vanguard in the Edward Gray 
papers (MG 55/18 No. 87) . 

e) Information on the Masonic Lodge accounts 1791 in the 
McDonald-Stone papers (MG 23 H II 1) . 

f) Ten items on the Freemasons of Montreal and especially the 
St. Lawrence Lodge No. 923 in the Murdock-Morrison papers 
(MG 24 L 17) . 

g) Summonses and invitations from lodges and chapters of the 
Royal Arch masons sent to John James Gemmell (1835-91) an 
Ottawa barrister of the legal firm of Lees and Gemmell in 
the J.J. Gemmell papers (MG 24 L 18). 

h) Information on the Masonic Order and Order of the Mystic 
Shrine in the Barnhart family papers (MG 30 C 40) . 

i) Thomas Tweed papers (MG 30 E 190) . Tweed was active in 
the Masons at the turn of the century. 

j) Col. W.N. Ponton papers (MG 30 E 96). A significant source 
since Ponton was Grand First Principal of the Grand Chapter 
of the Royal Arch Masons. 

k) Information on the Chinese Freemasons in the Sam family 
papers (MG 55/30 No. 166) . 

1) Information on the Chinese Freemasons in the Yee Yee Tarn 
papers (MG 30 E 314) . 

m) Wasyl Perepeluk papers (MG 30 C 101) . On the Masons in 
Manitoba. 

n) Information on the Masonic Lodge in Prince Edward Island 
in the H.F. Jarvis papers (MG 24 K 57). 

o) Information on les f rancs-macons in the A-Leo Leymarie 
papers (MG 22 B 1) . 



31 



Other information on the Masons may be found by checking 
our indexes under the names of particular lodges. For example 
we have the papers of the Mount Zion Masonic Lodge of Kemptville, 
Ontario (MG 28 I 162) . 



CEREMONY OF THE INSTALLATION OF THE WORSHIPFUL 

MASTER AND THE INVESTITURE OF THE OFFICERS OF 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 7 30, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C 

Wednesday, November 19, 1980, Cambridge 



Installing Board 



I.M. W.J. Curtis 


Tyler 


G 


.J. 


Powell 


S.W. C.B.E. LeGresley 


D.C. 




J. 


Hobson 


J.W. G.R. Jackson 


A.D.C. 


C 


.J. 


Woodburn 


S.D. H. Edgar 


A. D.C. 


E 


.J. 


Brown 


J.D. R. Forest-Jones 


Chaplain 


A 


.W. 


Watson 


The Work 










Present W. Master - elect 


J. Pos 








Antient Charges 


Toronto District 7 


Masters 


Obliqation (2nd Deqree) 


E. Steen 








Obliqation (Board) 


A.N. Newell 








Secret Work 


J. White 








Install W.M. 


A.L. Copeland 








Invest I. P.M. 


D. Grinton 








Workinq Tools (3rd) 


J. Gerrard 








Workinq Tools (2nd) 


C. Baxter 








Workinq Tools (1st) 


K. Flynn 








Book of Con. & Warrant 


R.D. Langs 








Charqe from N.E. 


W.A. Isbister 








Investiture of Officers 










S.W. B. LeGresley 


Deacons 




E. 


Ralph 


J.W. N. Strutt 


D.C. & Steward 


s 


L. 


Hahn 


Charge to Ws . F. Ferguson 


Organist 




S. 


Thurtell 


Chaplain A.W. Watson 


I.G. 




J. 


Woodburn 


Treas. R. McMaster 


Tyler 




E. 


Brown 


Sec'y. R. Bruce 


Historian 




F. 


Branscombe 



General Charge D.J. McFadgen 
Proclamation T.L. Peyton 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1979 - 1980 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 

59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard O. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R. W. Bro. Lewis Hahn 
7 5 York St., Kitchener, N2G 1T5 

LODGE OFFICERS 
1978-79 



w 


M. 


R 


W.Bro. 


-P 


M. 


R 


.W.Bro. 


s 


w. 


R 


.W.Bro. 


J 


w. 




W.Bro. 


s 


D. 




W.Bro. 


J 


D. 


R 


W.Bro. 


I 


G. 


R 


.W.Bro. 


s 


S. 


R 


W.Bro. 


J 


s. 




W.Bro. 



Donald S. Grinton 
Keith R.A. Flynn 
Ronald E. Groshaw 
George E. Zwicker 
Galfour LeGresley 
David C Bradley 
C.E. Drew 
Robert Throop 
Albert A. Barker 



Tyler 
Sec'y 
A/Sec* y 
Treas. 
D.C. 
Chap. 
Organist 
Historian 



R. W.Bro 
V. W.Bro, 

R. W.Bro, 
R. W.Bro 

W.Bro 
R. W.Bro 

W.Bro 



C.F. Grimwood 
•Jacob Pos 

W.E. Wilson 
Roy S. Sparrow 
Rev. W.G. Rivers 
L.R. Hertel 
Henry G. Edgar 



LODGE COMMITTEES FOR 1979-80 

GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R. W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, (S.W.); 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, 

(J.W.): W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.): and R. W.Bro. David C. 
Bradley. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R. W.Bro. Ed Ralph; W.Bro. 

Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.); V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; W.Bro. Bert 
Mennie; and R. W.Bro. Robert Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R. W.Bro. Robert Throop, (S.S.); 
W.Bro. Albert A. Barker, (J.S.); Local Co-Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 



RECEPTION - Chairman, R. W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, 
Grimwood, (Tyler); and R. W.Bro. Wm. S. 



(D.C. ) ; R. W.Bro. C.E. 
McVittie. 



MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R. W.Bro. Frank Bruce; R. W.Bro. Gary 
Powell; and V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos; R. W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; and R. W.Bro. John C. Woodburn. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R. W.Bro. James 
Gerrard; R. W.Bro. David Bradley; R. W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw; W.Bro. 
Paul Engel; and Bro. Kenneth Bartlett. 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers; R. W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 
and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R. W.Bro. David Bradley; R. W.Bro. Edsel 
Steel; and R. W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after a Brother's na; 
this is an automatic appointment as defined by the Lodge By-Laws. 
The duties of all Lodge Committees are outlined in Article VIII, 
Sections 1 to 11. Please note requirements for an annual budget. 



Wbt heritage lobge iSo -730 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Ronald E. Groshaw, W.M. 
31 Princess Margaret Blvd 
Islington, Ontario, 
M9A 1Z5 



(416) 233-9429 Home 
(416) 247-7426 Bus. 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

Jacob Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Avenue 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 



(519) 821-4995 Home 
(519) 824-4120 Bus. 



Vol. 04, No. 02 Cambridge, Ontario, Canad; 



November, 1980 



This Bulletin contains the summons for the next Regular 
Meeting, the General Purpose Committee Meeting and the followin; 
Regular Meeting; as well as the Proceedings of the Fifteenth 
Regular Meeting held on Wednesday, November 19th, 1980, a copy 
of the Address titled "Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, 
England", presented by R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod on the occasion 
of our Fraternal Visit to Occident Lodge No. 346, G.R.C., and 
notice of several coming events. 

PLEASE NOTE: The opinions expressed by the speakers, reviewers 
and participants in the papers and discussions 
presented in these Proceedings are not necessarily 
those of The Heritage Lodge. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. 
Groshaw, you are hereby requested to attend the Sixteenth 
Regular Meeting of the Lodge to be held in the D ufferin Avenue 
Ma s onic T emple, London, Ontari o , on: 

SA TURDAY AFTER NO ON, FEBRUARY 28th, 1981, AT 2:00 P.M. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such bus- 
iness as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. We have 
been invited to London on behalf of the District Committees of 
Masonic Education of London East and London West. On this 
ocassion Bro. Timothy Harold Barnes, Senior Deacon of Friend- 
ship Lodge No. 729, Pickering, will present a paper titled 
"The Great Lights; An Historical and Symbolic Interpretation". 
We shall be looking forward to an interesting new experience and 
the opportunity to meet with our Brethren in the London and 
surrounding Districts. 



At this meeting we shall also be balloting on sixteen 
applications for affiliation. The names and particulars of the 
Brethren applying for membership are listed on pages 6 § 7 of 
these Proceedings, Vol.4, No . 2 . 

REGULAR MEETING IN MARCH 

The Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, hereby 
informs you that the Seventeenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge will be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple 
located at the North-East corner of the intersection of Highways 
No. 401 and No. 24, on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 18th, AT 7:30 P.M . 

The Lodge will be opened in the customary manner and then 
called off from labour to refreshment to permit full partici- 
pation of the Committee on General Purposes, when written 
reports will be received from the various standing and Appointed 
Committees of the Lodge. 

NOTE: It is expected that the Committee Chairmen (as listed on 
the last page of these Proceedings) will have been in 
consultation with the members of their respective 
Committees before drafting their written report. As only 
written reports will be accepted for discussion. 

Following the General Purpose Committee Meeting, the 
Lodge will be called on from refreshment to labour to resume 
the Regular Business of the Lodge. A sequel paper titled "The 
Great Lights of Masonry; Some Queries and Facts", will be 
presented by Brother Tim Barnes. Several important topics 
concerning the future activities of the Lodge will be discussed 
and the resulting recommendations acted upon. The Worshipful 
Master is most desirous of having a good representation of the 
members present for these important deliberations. Other Masons 
interested in the aims and objectives of our lodge are most 
welcome . 

Sincerely and fraternally, 

V.W.Bro. J. Pos, Secretary 

* * * 

THE 'COMPASSES 

The Compasses will circumscribe 

And keep within control 

All passions, which, if unrestrained, 

Must stultify the soul: 

Extended wide the points go out 

To meet the circle's trend, 

An emblem of eternity, 

The line without an end. 

South Canterbury Lodge of Research No. 436 
Grand Lodge of New Zealand 



PROCEEDINGS 

The Fifteenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 
730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, 
Cambridge, Wednesday, November 19th, A.D. 1980, with 15 
Officers, 47 Members and 43 Visitors for a total of 105 Masons 
as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:40 p.m. by 
R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn who welcomed the Brethren present, and 
expressed the regrets of R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, the Worshipful 
Master who would be arriving later in the evening. As this was 
to be a busy meeting, R.W.Bro. Flynn proceeded directly into 
the regular business. 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Groshaw, seconded by 
V.W.Bro. Langs, that the minutes of the Fourteenth Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge, held on September 17th, 1980, be adopted 
as circulated in the Lodge Proceedings (Vol.1, No. 4), dated 
September, 1980. Motion Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

The reports of the Committees on Applications (25) for 
Affiliation as presented on pages 19, 20 and 21 of the previous 
Lodge Proceedings (Vol.1, No. 4), dated September 1980, all 
reported favourable. 

MOTION Re: Reports of Committees on Petitions 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. George Zwicker seconded 
by R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew, that the reports be received, the 
committees discharged and proper notice for balloting be 
included in the Lodge Summons for the next Regular Meeting. 
Motion Carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From R.W.Bro. D.J.H. Thompson, Secretary of Temple Lodge 
No. 690, dated October 20th, Kitchener, advising that 
Bro. Tan Black Ferguson, 196 Cornwall St., Waterloo, was 
suspended for non-payment of dues. 

2. From W.Bro. Bruce Miller, Waterloo District Secretary, 
dated October 22nd, advising of the availability of tickets 
for the Grand Master's Reception, and an enclosure on the 
subject of "Processing an Application for Initiation". 

3. From Bro. Peter M. Floyd, member of The Heritage Lodge, 
dated October 26th, Kingston, announcing that a new 
Mosaic Pavement was recently installed in the Kingston 
Temple, and that he had prepared a short paper discussing 
the design considerations which he was prepared to present 
to The Heritage Lodge. 



From Bro . W. Sherrington, member of The Heritage Lodge, 
dated October 26th, Edmonton, Alberta, enclosing two 
copies of the Grand Lodge Bulletin for Alberta. The 
following excerpt was taken from a full page spread 
announcing the formation of a Research Lodge: 

"On the 14th June, 1980, The Grand Lodge of Alberta 
at its Annual Communication approved the granting of 
a charter to a new Lodge in Alberta. This was no 
ordinary Lodge for it will never be able to 'make a 
Mason', but it will, we hope, contribute in some way 
to the Masonic growth of all Masons in the Jurisdiction 
This Special Lodge will be named 'FIAT LUX Lodge of 
Research', and to commemorate its year of Constitution 
and Consecration it will be numbered '1980' on the 
Register of Grand Lodge. It is one of the major 
activities of the Grand Lodge of Alberta to celebrate 
75 years of Masonry as an independent Grand 
Jurisdiction . 

From W.Bro. Leroy K Norton, member of The Heritage 
Lodge, dated October 27th, Georgetown, requesting a 
demit . 

From the Grand Secretary, M. W.Bro. R.E. Davies, dated 
October 28th, Hamilton, granting approval from the 
Grand Master, M. W.Bro. N.R. Richards, for the use of 
new application forms for Masons seeking membership in 
The Heritage Lodge by affiliation only. (The new form 
requires the traditional two sponsoring signatures with 
the addition of three supporting signatures; and 
eliminates the need for a special committee of enquiry). 

From R. W.Bro. Bert A. Mennie, D.D.G.M., South Huron 
District, and Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge, dated 
October 30th, Stratford, sending us the name and address 
of the Sec. and W.M. of the Masonic Lodge of Research of 
the State of Connecticut. (To be added to our mailing 
list to receive a copy of our Lodge Proceedings). 

From W.Bro. George A. Campbell, Charter Member of The 
Heritage Lodge, dated October 31st, St. Catharines, 
thanking the Lodge for accepting and publishing the paper 
"Our Grand Masters, A.F. § A.M., G.R.C., 1855-1980" 
(Lodge Proceedings Vol.4, No.l), which was presented by 
R. W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls. W.Bro. Campbell writes 
"It really feels good knowing I am an accepted member of 
The Heritage Lodge". 

From R. W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod, Chairman of the Grand 
Lodge Committee on Masonic Education and a Charter Member 
of The Heritage Lodge, dated October 31st, Toronto, 
requesting that The Librarian of the Grand Lodge Library 
in the Freemasons' Hall, London, England be added to our 
mailing list to receive a copy of our Lodge Proceedings. 



10. From W.Bro. Greg Robinson, Vice-Chairman of the Committee 
on Masonic Education for Toronto District 3, and a 
Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge, dated November 3rd, 
Toronto, and enclosing for the archives of The Heritage 
Lodge, a number of Masonic stamps, including the 1941 
anti-Masonic set from Serbia, the 1956 Masonic Temple 
set from Cuba, and the 1978 Grand Lodge of Luxembourg 
issue . 

11. From W.Bro. W. Bruce Miller, Waterloo District Secretary, 
dated November 5th, Elmira, enclosing a questionnaire and 
requesting assistance in completing a Dues Structure Survey 
of Lodges in Waterloo District. 

MOTION Re: Correspondence 

It was regularly moved by V. W.Bro. Randal Langs, seconded 
by W.Bro. George Zwicker, that the correspondence be received 
and processed in the usual manner. Motion Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $816.86 were presented, 
and on a motion by W.Bro. Wm . T. Boratynec, seconded by W.Bro. 
R. Forest -Jones , were passed and ordered paid: 

Secretary's Account 

Postage up to Nov. 19, 1980. $24.78 
Post Office Account 60.00 

$ 
84.78 
Mrs. S. Jackson, Guelph 

Typing Sept. Proceedings (31 pages) 31.00 

House of Print, Guelph 

Printing 425 copies Sept. Proceedings, 

Vol.4, No.l, Invoice No. 11296 225.00 

Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corp. 

Rent for fiscal year 1980-81. 270.00 

Waterloo District Secretary 

District tax, 268 @ 65<t 174.20 

Sr. Stewards Ace. (R. W.Bro. R. Throop) 

Refreshments for Nov. 19, 1980 31.88 



Total: $816.86 

MOTION Re: Payment of Grand Lodge Fees 

As there would not be a Regular Meeting of the Lodge, 
before the above fees for the year ending December 31, 1980, 
were due and payable, it was regularly moved by W.Bro. Reginald 
Forest -Jones , seconded by R. W.Bro. James H. Hutchinson that the 
Secretary and Treasurer be authorized to make the necessary 
payment. Carried. 



6 - 



BRETHREN 12 MONTHS IN ARREARS OF DUES 

Bro. Ronald Lucy, R.R. #1, Brantford. 

Bro. Kenneth A. Price, 640 Roselawn Avenue, Toronto. 

The Secretary reported that Registered letters were sent 
to both Brethren on June 3rd, 1980, and that the correspondence 
to Brother Price was returned as unclaimed. 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for affiliation were received as follows: 

1. STRUTT, Norman Richard, P.G.J.W.; 52 Sunvale Dr., Weston; 
Age 62; Accommodation Officer; Member of Caledonia Lodge 
No. 637, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. William A. Strutt 
and R.W.Bro. Robt. S. Throop . 

2. WRIGHT, Robert C, D.D.G.M.; 784 Broadway St., Wyoming; 
Age 63; Construction Foreman; Member of Huron Lodge 

No. 392, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. Donald J. Emerick 
and R.W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson. 

3. CAMERON, Geoffrey D., P.M.; 908-1755 Riverside Drive, 
Ottawa; Age 39; Civil Servant; Member of Corinthian 
Lodge No. 476, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. W.B. Bolton 
and Bro. CT. Jones. 

4. CAMP, Norman, P.M.; 602 Base Line Road E., London; 
Age 59; Clerk L.C.B.O.; Member of St. John's Lodge 

No. 20, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. Donald J. Emerick 
and R.W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson. 

5. CHAMBERS, George William, P.M.; 402 Westview Drive, 
Sudbury; Age 59; Teacher; Member of Subdury Lodge No. 658, 
G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. Robert T. Runciman and 
W.Bro. T.J. Thorn. 

6. GILLELAN, David Robertson, W.M.; 162 Humbervale Blvd., 
Toronto; Age 51; Manager; Member of The General Mercer 
Lodge No. 548, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. Peter Maydan 
and R.W. Bro. J.W. Gerrard. 

7. MacKENZIE, John D., P.M.; 34 Brookland Drive, Bramalea; 
Age 46; Forecast Analyst; Member of Blackwood Lodge 

No. 311, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
and R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

8. SMALL, Franklin Blair, P.M.; 25 Monterey Cres., Lambeth, 
Age 62; Clerk; Member of St. Paul's Lodge No. 107, G.R.C; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson and R.W.Bro. Donald 
J. Emerick. 

9. BARNES, Timothy Harold, M.M. ; 124 Grand River Blvd., 
Scarborough; Age 36; Records Service Manager; Member of 
Friendship Lodge No. 729, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. 
Frank J. Bruce and R.W.Bro. CE. Drew. 

10. DENGATE, Richard James, M.M. ; 72 Bond St., London; Age 72; 
Retired; Member of St. John's Lodge No. 20, G.R.C; 
recommended by W.Bro. Tom Johnson and R.W.Bro. Ed Carson. 



11. DUKE, Melvyn James, M.M. ; #253, 3060 Constitution Blvd., 
Mississauga; Age 39; Manager; Member of St. John's Lodge 
No. 75, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn 
and R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce. 

12. EAGLESON, John Herbert, P.M.; P.O. Box 231, Sunderland; 
Age 69; Retired; Member of King Edward Lodge No. 464, 
G.R.C.; recommended by Bro . A.B. Patterson and V.W.Bro. 
J. Pos. 

13. ERWIN, Daniel George, M.M. ; 16 King St., R.R. #2, Camlachie 
Age 35; Computer Operator; Member of Huron Lodge No. 392, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod and 
R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

14. HUNTER, John Lazlo, M.M.; 65 Huntingdale Blvd., Scarborough 
Age 68; Sales Engineer; Member of Andor Gero Lodge 

No. 726, G.R.C.; recommended by M.W.Bro. W.K. Bailey and 
R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

15. LAWRENCE, David G., M.M.; 31 Dunlace Dr., Willowdale; 
Age 48; Lawyer; Member of Ionic Lodge No. 25, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew and R.W.Bro. 
A.N. Newell. 

16. MARTIN, William A., M.M. ; 133 Sydenham St., Brantford; 
Age 32; Cost Analyst; Member of Brant Lodge No. 45, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Harry W. Chivers and 

R. W. Bro . Clare A. Parsons. 

MOTION Re: Petitions for Affiliation 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Donald Emerick, 
seconded by W.Bro. George Zwicker that as the Petitions have 
been made to conform to the new procedure approved by Special 
Dispensation from Grand Lodge that the Petitions be received 
and that the names and required particulars be published in the 
next Lodge Summons and that the applications be balloted upon 
at the next Regular Meeting. Motion Carried. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw, Chairman of the General Purpose 
Committee, reported that since there was no meeting in October, 
there was no report; however, one or two important items of 
business would be discussed under General Business. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

The Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson for 
the Treasurer and Auditor's Report: 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 A.F. $ A.M., G.R.C. 
TREASURER'S REPORT FOR YEAR SEPT. 1, 1979 - AUG. 31, 1980. 

OPERATING FUND, ACC. NO. 7031 

Receipts - Annual Dues $3,060.00 

Bank Interest 18.61 

Purchase of Securities 1,000.00 

For Transfer to Cap. Fund 967.50 



For Purchase of Regalia 




370. 


,00 


Miscellaneous 




415. 


,00 


Total 


Receipts : 


$5,831, 


.11 


Disbursements-Transferred to C 


ap . Fund 


$ 678, 


,75 


Rent 




670, 


,00 


Refreshments 




86, 


,12 


Printing and Typ 


ing 


1,414, 


.21 


Postage 




265, 


,98 


Grand Lodge Dues 




561, 


.50 


District Dues 




156, 


.00 


Purchase of Securities 


1,000, 


.00 


Regalia 




543, 


,56 


Miscellaneous 


rsements 


181, 


.25 


Total Disbu 


$5,703, 


.27 


Summary - Bank Balance, Sept. 


1, 1979. 


$868, 


,36 


Receipts 


5,831.11 






Disbursements 


5,703.27 








127.84 
31, 1980. 


127, 


,84 


Bank Balance at Aug. 


$996, 


,20 


CAPITAL FUND, ACC. NO. 57032 








Receipts - Affiliations 


630.00 






Investment Interest 


564.28 






Bank Interest 


104.00 







Total Receipts 1,298.28 

Disbursements 

Purchase of Roy. Mor. Cert. 1,000.00 

Total Disbursements 1,000.00 



Summary - Bank Balance, Sept. 1, 1979. 1,509.97 

298.28 
000.00 
298.28 298.28 



Receipts 1,298.28 

Disbursements 1,000.00 



Bank Balance at Aug. 31, 1980. $1,808.25 

LODGE ASSETS AT AUG. 31, 1980. 

Roy. Mor. Investment Certificate #110113208 

8-3/4% Matures Oct. 17, 1982. 5,000.00 

Gov't, of Canada Bond #J 20M00179 

9-3/4% Matures Feb. 1, 1982. 1,000.00 

Roy. Mor. Investment Certificate #150008706 

11U Matures Sept. 28, 1984. 1,000.00 

Lodge Seal 61.73 

Bank Balance Operating Fund 996.20 

Bank Balance Capital Fund 1,808.25 

9, 866. IT 
Add Outstanding Dues 130.00 

Total Assets $9,996.18 



- 9 - 



LODGE LIABILITIES AT AUG. 31, 1980. 

Prepaid Dues $345.00 

Total Liabilities $345.00 

Total Assets $9,996.18 

Total Liabilities 345.00 

$9,651.18 

MOTION Re: Treasurer 's Report 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson seconded 
by V.W.Bro. Randal Langs that the Teasurer's Report be accepted 
as presented. Carried. 

MOTION Re: Election of Auditors 

R.W.Bro. W.J. Curtis nominated W.Bro. Kenneth G. Bartlett, 
and W.Bro. Norman E. Taylor as Auditors for The Heritage Lodge. 

Moved by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and R.W.Bro. James H. 
Hutchinson that nominations close. Carried. 

R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn declared W.Bro. Bartlett and 
W.Bro. Taylor as Auditors for The Heritage Lodge No. 730. 

REPORT OF FUTURE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

The Special Committee on Future Planning, appointed on a 
motion at the last meeting of the Committee on General Purposes 
held on August 20, 1980, met at the home of Dr. Allan N. Newell 
29 Golfdale, Brantford, on Tuesday, September 23rd, 1980. 

Present: A.N. Newell, E.J. Brown, R.E. Groshaw, J. Pos and 
G.E. Zwicker. 

In the absence of the Chairman, A.N. Newell was appointed 
Chairman, and J. Pos acted as Recording Secretary. The meeting 
was called to order at 5:25 p.m. 

The following agenda was agreed upon: 

1. Territorial jurisdiction. 

2. District association. 

3. Lodge meeting place. 

4. Types of membership and 
association privileges. 

Each person addressed themselves to the various items on 
the agenda, and after considerable discussion, the following 
recommendations were formulated with the unanimous approval of 
those present : 

1. That the territorial jurisdiction of this Lodge shall 
continue to be co-existant with the territorial jurisdic- 
tion of The Most Worshipful The Grand Lodge of Canada in 
the Province of Ontario. 

2. That this Lodge should come under the jurisdiction of a 
Masonic District for administrative purposes, and that 
at least one obligatory meeting, which may include the 



- 10 - 



Election of Officers, Installation and Investiture of the 
Worshipful Master and Lodge Officers, and the Official 
Visit of the District Deputy Grand Master, shall be held 
in that District. 

3. That a travelling Warrant or Charter be requested from the 
Grand Lodge so that meetings of this Lodge, other than 
the obligatory meeting may be held at the invitation of 

a host Lodge at a mutually accepted date. 

4. That the composition of the Lodge shall consist of: 
ACTIVE MEMBERS, and CORRESPONDING SUBSCRIBERS: 

a) Active Members - All masons within the Grand Jurisdic- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario, who are desirous of participating in the 
activities of the Lodge., are eligible for membership. 

b) Correspondence Subscribers - All Master Masons in good 
standing in those Grand Lodges with which we are in 
amnity, who reside outside the jurisdictional limits 
of this Grand Lodge, as well as any Masons within 
this jurisdiction, who do not wish to be active 
members, may become Corresponding Subscribers and 
receive the regular publications of the Lodge. 

5. That applications for Active Membership in this Lodge, 
from Members who are in good standing in a Regular Lodge 
in this Grand Jurisdiction, may be accepted for membership 
without a Committee of Enquiry, as long as the application 
is accompanied by a letter from his Lodge, confirming his 
standing, signed by the Worshipful Master or Secretary 
over the Lodge Seal. 

Following further interesting and profitable discussion, 
led by Ronald Growshaw on a special museum project as well as 
short-term and future horizon planning for the Lodge, the 
meeting adjouned at 7:30 p.m. 

J. Pos, Recording Secretary. 

MOTION Re: Report of Future Planning Committee 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Donald Emerick seconded 
by R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew, that the above Report be accepted and 
adopted. Carried. 

At this time R.W.Bro. Carson, speaking on behalf of the 
Districts of London East and London West, extended an invitation 
to The Heritage Lodge to meet at the Dufferin Street Temple on 
Saturday, February 28th, 1981, to hold a typical Lodge Meeting 
with the two London Districts as hosts. 

MOTION Re: The Above Invitation 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Groshaw seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Emerick, that the Lodge accept the invitation to hold 
a meeting and present a paper at the Dufferin Street Temple in 
London, Ontario, Saturday, February 28th, 1981. Motion Carried. 



- 11 - 



BALLOTING 

On a motion by W.Bro. Forest-Jones and R.W.Bro. A.W. 
Watson it was agreed to ballot collectively. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applications, the 
Worshipful Master declared the following Brethren eligible for 
membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, by affiliation, and 
requested that each new member affix his signature in the 
Lodge Register at his earliest convenience in token of sub- 
mission to the Lodge By-Laws: 

R.W.Bros. Clifford John Baxter, Hugh Matheson, Jack 
Allister Foster, Robert Thomas Runiciman and Francis Roy 
Weatherdon. 

W.Bros. Donald William Bain, Jack Dale, Gordon Albert 
Down, Kenneth Duncan Fraser, Thomas Arch Johnson, Robert 
Denzey Jones, Richard Allan Liebrock, Ian Alexander McSkimming, 
Hilary Francis John Mavin, Terrance John Thorn, Robert Joseph 
Thomas Smith and William R. Smith. 

Bros. John D. Chadbourne, Arnold Russell Colbert, Neil 
Reginald Drury, Arthur James Mclssac, Arthur Blachford 
Patterson, Donald Victor Harold Vale, Aube Weisman and Lint 
Arthur Wei in. 

At this time the Lodge was called from labour to 
refreshment for the space of 10 minutes and on returning to 
labour R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton, Worshipful Master assumed 
the gavel and continued with the work of the evening. 

RECEIVING VISITORS 

R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, Director of Ceremonies was admitted 
on three occasions to introduce: 

First the Worshipful Masters; W.Bros. James Hunter W.M. 
of St. Clair Lodge No. 135, Milton; Rev. W. Gray Rivers, W.M. 
of Concord Lodge No. 722, Cambridge; Eric Johanson W.M., of 
Alma Lodge No. 72, Cambridge and John Cunningham, W.M. of 
Grand River Lodge No. 151, Kitchener. 

Second the Grand Lodge Officers; R.W.Bros. Lance Buttler, 
D.D.G.M., Toronto District No. 1; Duncan J. McFadgen, D.D.G.M., 
Hamilton District A; Balfour LeGreslay, G.S.W.: G. Robert 
Jackson, G.J.W.; Ronald Groshaw, P.G.S.W., Member of the 
Board; Bill Isbister, P.G.S.W., Member of the Board; Eric G. 
Horwood, P.G.S.W., Member of the Board; Edsel Steen, P.D.D.G.M. 
Member of the Board; Robert S. Throop, P.G.S.W., Member of 
the Board; David Bradley, P.D.D.G.M., Member of the Board; 
V.W.Bros. Gordon Wilef, G.O.; L. Ferguson, G.S.; Keith Strong, 
G.S.; Lome Houghton, G.S.; and Royden Smith, G.S. 

Third, R.W.Bro. Talbot L. Peyton, D.D.G.M. of Waterloo 
District, who after receiving grand honours, welcomed the 
visitors to Waterloo District. 

The Worshipful Master then called on W.Bro. Rev. Gray 
Rivers, Lodge Chaplain, to attend the Altar. 



12 - 



AT THE ALTAR 

Brethren: 

As we approach another Ceremony of Installation and 
Investiture I believe the instructions of St. Paul to the 
newly established Church in Rome are worthy of our notice. 
They are contained in the beautiful 12th Chapter of Romans, a 
few comments from which I would quote - using Dr. J.B. Phillips 
vivid wording: 

"with eyes wide open to the mercies of God, I beg you, my 
brothers, as an act of intelligent worship, to give your 
bodies, as a living sacrifice, consecrated to him, and 
acceptable by him. Don't let the world around you squeeze you 
into its own mould, but let God re-mould your minds from 
within, so that you may prove in practice that the plan of 
God for you is good, meets all his demands, and moves towards 
the goal of true maturity .. .Just as you have many members in 
one physical body and those members differ in their functions, 
so we, through many in numbers compose one body in Christ (we 
could legitimately say, "in Masonry") and all are members of 
one another. Through the grace of God we have different gifts. 
Let us use them to the limit of our vision... Let us have real 
warm affection for one another, as between brothers, and a 
willingness to let the other man have the credit. Let us not 
allow slackness to spoil our work, and let us keep the fires 
of the spirit burning as we do our work for the Lord..." 

And now, as we pause a moment for Prayer, I would like to 
use the optional prayer as provided in "The Work" of the 
Ancient York Rite of the mid-18th Century, for use in the 
Opening in the First Degree: 

Brethren, Let us Pray: 

"Most holy and glorious Lord God, the great Architect of 
the Universe, the giver of all good gifts and graces: Thou 
hast promised that 'where two or three are gathered together 
in Thy name, Thou wilt be in their midst and bless them.' In 
Thy name we have assembled, and in Thy name we desire to 
proceed in all our doings. Grant that the sublime principles 
of Freemasonry may so subdue every discordant passion within 
us, so harmonize and enrich our hearts with Thine own love and 
goodness, that the Lodge at this time may humbly reflect that 
order and beauty which reign ' forever before Thy throne. Amen. 

SO MOTE IT BE 

At this time Worshipful Master Donald Grinton called on 
R.W.Bro. W. James Curtis, Installing Master, to proceed with 
the ceremony of Installation and Investiture. 

The Master-Elect was presented by V.W.Bro. Pos and the 
questions from the Secretary were given by representatives from 
the Toronto Districts. 

During the ceremony, R.W.Bro. Robert Loftus presented to 
R.W.Bro. Groshaw a unique and historic gavel which had been 
used by M.W.Bro. R.E. Davies and Grand Master of Israel at a 
special meeting at Tel Avive. The gavel was made of wood from 
an olive tree in Jerusalem. In making the presentation, on 



- 13 - 

behalf of Mrs. (Barbara) Groshaw, R.W.Bro. Loftus admonished 
the new Worshipful Master to use the gavel with authority and 
discretion in the Lodge but not to get carried away with its 
power at home. 

Following a most impressive and dignified ceremony, the 
following Officers were Invested in their respective offices: 

W.M. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

I. P.M. R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton. 

S.W. W.Bro. George E. Zwicker. 

J.W. R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

CHAPLAIN W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers. 

TREASURER R.W.Bro. Gary J . Powell. 

SECRETARY V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 
ASSIST. SECY. R.W.Bro. Ed. V. Ralph. 

S.D. R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley. 

J.D. R.W.Bro. Charles Edwin Drew. 

I.G. R.W.Bro. Robt. S. Throop. 

TYLER R.W.Bro. Charles F. Grimwood. 

ORGANIST R.W.Bro. Len Hertel . 

HISTORIAN W.Bro. Henry C. Edgar. 

D.C. R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn. 

S.S. W.Bro. Albert A. Barker. 

J.S. R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen. 

The General Charge was given by R.W.Bro. Duncan McFadgen 
and the Proclamation by R.W.Bro. Talbot Peyton. 

MOTION Re: Vote of Thanks 

On a motion by W.Bro. George Zwicker and R.W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley a grateful and sincere vote of thanks was extended to 
R.W.Bro. James Curtis and all members of the Installing Board 
for the excellent manner in which the Ceremony was conducted. 
Supported by loud applause from the Brethren. In acknowledging 
the appreciation, R.W.Bro. Curtis thanked all those who had 
participated and stated that this opportunity had forged another 
link in the masonic tie, one which will always be remembered. 

PRESENTATION 

R.W.Bro. Groshaw, the new Worshipful Master called on 
W.Bro. Robt. Butler, who, on behalf of R.W.Bro. Lawrence 
Runnalls, presented three bound volumes of the current year's 
Lodge Proceedings; one for R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, I. P.M., 
one for the Lodge Archives and one for V. W.Bro. Jack Pos, 
Secretary . 

Our sincere thanks to R.W.Bro. Runnalls for his kind 
thoughtfulness . 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS - R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

This evening my heart is filled with gratitude and 
nostalgia. First, my gratitude to The Heritage Lodge for 
your support and generosity in electing me to the office of 
Worshipful Master. Secondly, to R.W.Bro. James W. Curtis and 
his magnificent Installing Board for placing me in the chair 
of King Solomon, an honour I shall always treasure. Thirdly, 
I am truly indebted to all of you for being here this evening. 
To have R.W.Bro. Peyton make his Official Visit on this 
occasion is very considerate of our DDGM and furthermore, 



- 14 



it creates in me a real feeling of nostalgia and sentimentality, 
you see, it was on this evening of the Official Visit in 1959 
of the DDGM to Conestoga Lodge No. 295 in Drayton that I was 
initiated into Masonry. R.W.Bro. Omand from New Hamburg was 
the DDGM at that time and the district included the present 
Wellington as well as the Waterloo District. 

That ceremony of my initiation was carried out in a small 
lodge room above the Royal Bank in Drayton. When M.W.Bro. 
Robert E. Davies was our G.M., He returned from Calgary with a 
picture. This picture was of a building in The Heritage Park 
in Alberta, where a small lodge room was located over a bank / 
in that pioneer village. I immediately became interested in/ 
his suggestion that our endeavours be used to encourage _2—— ^ 
similar structure here in one of our j_ip.neer villages^/ Despite 
the diligent and continuing efforts of V.W.Bro. Pos, such has 
not been feasible till this time. However, I am indebted_to_ 
W.Bro^ Jo hn Hesp (here this evening) , who inTrodtTCed me to the 
concept of moving a lodge room to The Black Creek Pioneer 
Village on Steeles Avenue in Toronto. Eight miles from that 
village in__£h.e-_T.Qwn of Woodbridge stands a reasonably well 
preserved storage building which was formerly the hardware 
store of Joel Reaman. On the second floor of this building 
was a lodge room which was utilized by Blackwood Lodge No. 311 
GRC from March 4, 1874 until 1898. This building and surround- 
ing property has recently been sold to a developer and the land 
will eventually be cleared for new buildings. Because this 
building was built before Confederation, The Black Creek 
Pioneer Village are naturally interested in acquiring it, as 
all of their buildings are Pre-Conf ederat ion . They have one 
of three sites in the village which could accommodate this 
building, all of which are close to public facilities. The 
administrative staff at Black Creek Pioneer Village desire to 
build a suitable foundation and move and restore this building 
to its former condition if they can procure some financial 
help as well as the building. During my year as your 
Worshipful Master I hope to explore every possibility regarding 
The Heritage Lodge, making such a transfer and restoration a 
reality. It would appear that if we could give financial 
support to such a venture and assure The Black Creek Pioneer 
Village that we would decorate, furnish and maintain the lodge 
room area, they they would start negotiating with the present 
owner to see if they could procure the building. If this 
venture ever did come to fruition then the village would 
appreciate a mason being in attendance at the lodge room on 
holidays and weekends, when the village is open. I t wou ld be 
my hope that with the large number of masons in the*~~ 
Metropolitan Toronto Area and the fact that public transportation 
goes to the village, that the lodge room could be supervised 
by a mason for every day that the village is open ten months of 
the year. 

In return, we as the lodge, would be guaranteed access to 
the lodge rooms at any time of the day or night all the year 
round. We would be allowed to have any ceremonies that we 
desired in the lodge room and we could also decide how the 
foundation was constructed. In other words, at our expense, 
we could have a humidity, temperature and gas controlled 
vault in the foundation as long as it was concealed (from view 
by visitors to the village) by means of landscaping. 

This pipe-dream is contingent upon the developer releasing 
the building to the pioneer village and the board of governors 



15 



of that village accepting the concept. 

We as a lodge would have to assure them that we could 
raise some money for this project and then decide if a safe 
storage area in the basement was feasible. 

First, regarding the finances, The Black Creek Pioneer 
Village has an income tax number so that donations would 
receive income tax relief. They would be happy to use this 
number for any donations from our membership to The Black 
Creek Pioneer Village and would also do all of the accounting 
and auditing of the monies and engineer the whole project. 
We could have scrutiny, of course, on the auditing and the 
general project in its entirity. In addition to monies raised 
by our organization, The Ontario Heritage Foundation pays one 
dollar for every two dollars that have been raised, hence if 
$40,000 were donated then The Ontario Heritage Foundation 
would add another $20,000 to the whole concept. 

Regarding ceremonies, The Black Creek Pioneer Village 
would encourage us to have a cornerstone laying ceremony as 
well as any other ceremony we wish to have inside or outside 
the building, with whatever privacy we desire. However, they 
would appreciate the cornerstone laying to be done on an 
occasion when a good crowd was at the village to witness a 
ceremony being done in similar manner to that prior to 
Confederation. Incidentally, over 600,000 people paid to visit 
this village during the past ten months it has been open in the 
twelve month period. If accepted, such a project does not 
preclude doing projects in other villages. In fact I would 
still like to see a lodge room above a bank in one of our 
Heritage Parks here in Ontario. 

Brethren, I hope that you are as enthused as I am about 
leaving no stone unturned in this worthwhile project to 
preserve our heritage as well as to make masonry more visible 
to the general population. 

Since being Instituted on September 21st, 1977, and for 
some time before that an immense amount of work has been 
done by your Lodge and hopefully this pattern will continue. 
The problem of suitable meeting time has continued and no time 
suits everyone. It is my hope that more people can be 
accommodated this year by moving the place as well as the time 
for each meeting. Arrangements have been completed to have 
our next paper given on Saturday, February 28, 1981, at The 
Masonic Temple in London at the invitation of the Education 
Committees of the two London Districts. At tulip time next 
spring, hopefully on the same weekend as the Dedication of 
the New Masonic Temple at Pembroke, I hope that we can meet in 
the Ottawa Region and share a paper about early masonry in 
the Ottawa Valley. At the time that the leaves turn to 
beautiful colours again next fall, I hope that we can visit 
either North Bay or Sudbury for the presentation of a paper 
hopefully in conjunction with a District Grand Lodge Event. 
I hope that a travelling concept will encourage membership, 
and foster a closeness of all our Brethren to The Heritage 
Lodge . 

As an added attraction, this will allow us to open lodge 
in this temple on our regularly stated meetings, we can then 
call the lodge to refreshment while we enjoy coffee at our 



16 



Committee of General Purposes, then call lodge on again to 
conduct a business meeting and get out of lodge at a reasonable 
hour . 

Two other projects in the coming year are the brain child 
of R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph, our Assistant Secretary. He is going 
to organize a concert of Masonic Music, followed by a social 
hour for masons and families and friends, hopefully in 
September of 1981. The other project is supplementary to and 
separate from the Data Bank which will be capably chaired by 

W.Bro. Paul Engel this coming year. The project in mind will 
require volunteers to go to 400 Museums in Ontario and prepare 
an inventory of the items in those Museums which have a 
Masonic connotation hopefully this will allow our membership 
at large to become personally involved with searching for 
memorabilia . 

Brethren, in closing, I wish to assure you that the Officers 
who have been Invested and Installed this evening are anxious 
and eager to work. We can accomplish a great deal with the 
diligent efforts of all of you. I am reminded of Ralph Waldo 
Emerson who said "Don't tell me your creed, show me your deed". 

I personally hope that each of us can be as proud of deeds in 
The Heritage Lodge in the next twelve months as we are of our 
deeds over the past five years. 

The Worshipful Master then called on R.W.Bro. Peyton, 
D.D.G.M., Waterloo District, who first congratulated the 
Worshipful Master and the Officers and felt assured the Lodge 
was in good hands for the ensuing masonic year. He also 
congratulated R.W.Bro. Curtis on an excellent Ceremony of 
Installation and Investiture and stated how much he enjoyed the 
work of the evening. 

R.W.Bro. Peyton complimented the Lodge on a very good 
report as presented to him by W.Bro. Bruce Miller the 
District Secretary. 

At this time W.Bro. Eric Johanson, Worshipful Master of 
Alma Lodge No. 72, Gait requested to meet with the Worshipful 
Master of The Heritage Lodge for the traditional presentation 
of the Waterloo District Travelling Square and Compasses and 
instructed R. W . Bro . Groshaw that it would be his responsibility 
to ensure that the Travelling Square and Compasses be passed 
on to the Worshipful Master of The Otto Klotz Lodge No. 731, 
Cambridge on the occasion of the Official Visit of the D.D.G.M., 
January 26, 1981. 

W.Bro. George Zwicker, S.W., and R.W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, J.W., thanked the Lodge for the honour bestowed 
upon them as Wardens of the Lodge. 

Follwing a few brief announcements and a special 
invitation of the J.W. to enjoy refreshments and fellowship 
in the Banquet Hall, the Lodge was closed in harmony at 

II :25 p.m. 

J. Pos, 
Secretary . 



126th Annual Communication 

Special Events 

July 14-16, 1981 



'MASONRY IN ACTION 



Tuesday, July 14, at 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m., workshop 
sessions will be held to discuss the following topics: 

A. The Lodge Historian - Discussion and suggestions 

for lodge historians. 

B. The Lodge Secretary - Recommendations, including 

special assistance for new 
lodge secretaries. 

C. The Office of D.D.G.M. - Responsibilities, role and 

workload for those aspiring 
to this office. 

D. Grand Lodge Committees - Separate committees will 

lead discussions on BLOOD 
DONORS, BENEVOLENCE, COND- 
ITION OF MASONRY and LIBRARY. 

Brethren will be able to register for any two of 
the above sessions, but confirm your space early. 
Registration forms are available from Lodge Secretaries 
or members of the Special Events Committee. 

Tuesday, July 14, at 4:30 p.m., A special report meeting 

will be held for all by the Masonic Foundation of Ontario 

Tuesday, July 14, at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., a showing of 
the film from the 125th Anniversary Play "The Birth of 
our Grand Lodge". 

'FELLOWSHIP BREAKFAST" 



Wednesday, July 15t from ?:00 a.m. to 8:15 a.m., a new social 
breakfast, no speeches allowed. Tickets are available 
from your D.D.G.M., at $6.50 each. 

'GRAND MASTER'S BANQUET" 



Wednesday, July 15i at 6:45 p.m. (note earlier start), The 
banquet will be held in the Canadian Koom and the Concert 
Hall on the Convention Floor. The speaker will be V.W.Bro. 
B.C. Matthews - President of the University of Waterloo. 
Reserved seats have been arranged for all Worshipful 
Masters. Tickets are available from your D.D.G.M. at $11.00 

R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn, Chairman, 
Special Events Committee, 
1379 Birchview Dr., Mississauga, 
Ontario, L5H 325 




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Q. C. CORRESPONDENCE CIRCLE LTD, 
27 GREAT QUEEN STREET, 
LONDON. WC2B 5BB 



3 September 1980 

W Bro I. Pos 

10 Mayfield Avenue 

Guelph 

Ontario NIG 2L8 

CANADA. 

Dear Bro. Pos, 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 

Thank you for the copy of the May Proceedings that you sent. 

I was especially interested in the article by Bro. J.E. 
Taylor, but in the interests of accurate reporting I must 
point out that in an English lodge the I. P.M. sits on the 
left of the Master and the Chaplain on his left, with seats 
further to the left reserved for holders of London Grand Rank 
and/or Officers of Provincial Grand Rank. 

The seats on the right of the Master are reserved for 
Grand Officers and visitors do not sit in the East unless 
they do so by virtue of their rank as explained above. 

Also, lest any of our Charities should be prejudiced, 
there are four, as Bro. Taylor states, and they are The Royal 
Masonic Benevolent Association, The Royal Masonic Hospital, 
The Royal Masonic Institution for Boys and The Royal Institution 
for Girls. 

It is quite untrue to say that two will be closed, 
however. In 1986, the first two will be combined in a 
charity for the sick and aged and the last two will be 
combined in a single educational charity for boys and girls. 

Reverting to your Proceedings, they are most attractively 
designed and printed, an example to many, and J congratulate 
you on their excellence. 

Sincerely and fraternally yours, 




- 17 - 

ADDRESS 

by 

R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod 

Re 



QUATUOR CORONATI LODGE 
No. 2076 London, England 



Occident Lodge, No. 346, Toronto. September 2, 1980 

Preamble 

Worshipful Master, my brethren: What a privilege and joy 
it is to be with you this evening! My association with the 
Occident Lodge goes back a number of years, and has always 
been marked on my side by a deep feeling of admiration. The 
lodge has enjoyed a sequence of outstanding Masters, and is one 
of the pace-setters for the jurisdiction. It would be invidious 
to single out individuals for particular mention, but I must 
name one, the first member of the lodge whom I ever met - an 
irascible outspoken loveable expert craftsman who was known 
throughout the district, the city, and the province. This 
brother, alas, is no longer in our midst, but I cannot let the 
evening go by without a word of appreciation for the life of 
R.W.Bro. Harold McBride. 

It was on April 5, 1977 that I was elected an Honorary 
Life Member of the Occident Lodge. Other commitments have 
prevented me from playing the active role I should have wished, 
but let there be no mistake about it; this is an honour that 
I value highly. 

Your Worshipful Master is a brother for whom I have long 
had a profound respect. In this constellation of glittering 
stars he shines forth with the brightness of the first 
magnitude. His creativity, his planning, his enthusiasm, his 
organization, his drive, his follow- through , his hard work, 
have given new meaning to the familiar words first uttered by 
Otto Klotz in 1864: "The lessons of virtue which proceed 
from the east, like rays of brilliant light streaming from the 
rising sun, illuminate the south and the west and as the work 
progresses are carefully imbibed by the workmen." Thank you, 
Worshipful Master, for your leadership, and for inviting me 
to address the lodge this evening. In token of his efficiency, 
Bro. Boersma not only told me when I was to come and talk to 
you, but what I was to talk about. 

Our topic for this command performance is "Quatuor 
Coronati Lodge." We shall try to show why this special body 
came into existence; we shall talk about how it works, some 
of the people that have been associated with it, and what it 
has accomplished; and then we shall close with a sort of sales 
pitch . 



- 18 



The "Imaginative" School of Masonic History 

Within the vast chronicle of human achievement which goes 
under the name of history, there are various sub-disciplines, 
one being Masonic History. Like all human endeavours, it is 
subject to the whims of fashion; what was in vogue several 
centuries ago is no longer so today. 

Let us talk for a few minutes about these changing 
fashions. The earliest version of a Masonic history comes 
from the "Old Charges," the manuscript constitutions which 
served to govern the operative masons of long ago; there are 
some 120 texts, all stemming from a lost original of about the 
year 1350. They open with a prayer, and continue with a 
panegyric of the science of Geometry or Masonry, originally 
synonymous terms. They give an extensive series of regulations, 
and conclude with the Masons' oath. They also offer a wide- 
ranging Traditional History of Geometry, Masonry, and Architect- 
ure . 

The craft of building was invented, they assure us, before 
Noah's flood, by Jubal; metal - founding was discovered by his 
brother Tubalcain. These brothers knew that God would send 
destruction to punish sin, so they wrote their arts on two 
great pillars, which were found after the Deluge. Then we hear 
about Nimrod and the Tower of Babel; and how Abraham went to 
Egypt, and taught the Liberal Arts and Sciences to the 
Egyptians; and how he had a student Euclid (there's a howler! 
a mistake of 1500 years); how King David loved Masons well; how 
Solomon built the Temple at Jerusalem, with the help of King 
Hiram of Tyre, and his master Builder. 

One man who worked at Solomon's Temple later went to 
France, and taught the Art to Charles Martel (there's another 
anachronism! this time a slip of 1800 years). Subsequently the 
Craft was brought from France to England, in the time of Saint 
Alban (a leap backwards of 500 years!). Finally, about the 
year 930, Prince Edwin called a great assembly of Masons in 
York, and established the regulations which continue in force 
"even up to this day." 

That is not history as we know it. It is full of impossible 
dates and other fantasies. In fact its aim was probably to 
serve as propaganda. It would inculcate in Masons a sense of 
respect and reverence for their craft. This was no servile 
trade of recent devising, but an ancient and honorable 
institution. It went back to antediluvian times, and was 
connected with famous buildings in the Sacred Writings, and 
numbered among its Votaries even Monarchs themselves. 

"Imaginative" History in Anderson's Constitutions 

Whatever may have been the purpose of this early 
traditional history, it set the pattern for centuries to come. 
Modern Masonry is generally said to have begun with the 
formation, in 1717, of the Mother Grand Lodge. When in 1723 
Dr. James Anderson published the first book of C onstitutions , 
he gave what purports to be a history of the Craft . It was in 
the same familiar tradition, for it begins as follows: 

"Adam, our first parent, created after the image of God, 
the Great Architect of the Universe, must have had the 
Liberal Sciences, particularly Geometry, written on his 



- 19 - 



heart . " 

It goes on to talk of 

"Noah, and his three sons, Japhet, Shem, and Ham, all 
Masons true," 

And proceeds with the "Grand Master Moses," and a whole 
series of Grand Masters (Solomon King of Israel, Nebuchadnezzar 
King of Babylon, Zerubbabel Prince of Israel, Augustus Caesar 
Emperor of Rome); then it gives a sequence of English leaders, 
including "our great Master-Mason Inigo Jones" under King 
James I. Even Monarchs themselves were members of the Royal 
Craft; Henry VI, and Charles I. 

Dermott's Protest, 1756 

Of course, in their rational intervals, Masons realized 
that all this was perverse. For example, Bro. Laurence 
Dermott, in his Ahiman. Rezon , the Constitution of the Antients, 
in 1756, has a merry time. 

"It has been the general custom of all my worthy 
brethren, who have honoured the Craft with their Books 
of Constitutions, or Pocket -Companions for Free-Masons, 
to give us a long and pleasing history of Masonry from 
the Creation to the time of their writing and publishing 
such accounts, viz. from Adam to Noah, from Noah to 
Nimrod, from Nimrod to Solomon, from Solomon to Cyrus, 
from Cyrus to Seleucus Nicator, from Seleucus Nicator 
to Augustus Caesar, from Augustus Caesar to the havoc 
of the Goths, and so on until the Revival of the 
Augustan Style, §c. 5c. $c . Wherein they give us an 
account of the drawing, scheming, planning, designing, 
erecting, and building of temples, towers, cities, 
castles, palaces, theatres, pyramids, monuments, bridges, 
walls, pillars, courts, halls, fortifications, and 
labyrinths, with the famous light-house of Pharos and 
Colossus at Rhodes, and many other wonderful works 
performed by the architects, to the great satisfaction 
of the readers and edification of Free-Masons. 

Having called to mind the old proverb, Better out of 
the world than out of fashion, I was fully determined to 
publish a History of Masonry, whereby I did expect to give 
the world an uncommon satisfaction; and in order to enable 
myself to execute this great design, I purchased all or 
most of the histories, constitutions, pocket - companions , 
and other pieces on that subject now extant in the 
English tongue. 

My next step was to furni sh mysel f with a sufficient 
quantity of pens, ink, and paper. This being done, I 
immediately fancied myself an historian, and intended to 
trace Masonry not only to Adam, in his sylvan lodge in 
Paradise, but to give some account of the Craft even 
before the Creation...." 



2 



Imaginative History 1770-1870 

But it was all in vain. The habit of imaginative history- 
was too strong. The great William Preston was a devoted Mason 
who deserves well of us; but in his Illustrations of Masonry 
of 1775, he tells how Freemasons built the Tower of London in 
the eleventh century, London Bridge in the twelfth, Westminster 
Abbey in the thirteenth, and so on, right down to St. Paul's 
in the seventeenth century. 

And the immortal George Oliver, who wrote over twenty 
volumes on Masonry in the middle years of the nineteenth 
century, was cast in the same mould. More recent writers 
ascribe to him "a too easy credulity and a too great warmth 
of imagination." 

Small wonder that Masonic "history" was regarded as a 
joke by serious students! 

The Advent of Rationalism 

Long before George Oliver a new age of critical enquiry 
had already dawned, heralded by the publication in France of 
the great Encyclopaedia, beginning in 1751. This new school 
of thought insisted on applying to the humanities the same 
standards of proof, the same scrutiny of evidence, and the same 
strict scientific method, that were already current in the 
sciences. Its influence soon permeated the study of early 
literature, Biblical criticism, and ancient history. There 
was a fair time-lapse before it percolated outwards from the 
universities, and began to reach other parts of society. The 
first really critical History of Masonry was written by the 
German Scholar Findel , and published in 1861. 

At the very time that Findel was writing, a young man who 
was destined almost single-handedly to change the course of 
English Masonic scholarship was serving with the British Army 
in North China. This was the unfortunately named Robert 
Freke Gould, who had been born in 1836, and was initiated into 
Masonry at the age of 19 in 1855. He started writing for the 
Masonic press three years later, and soon began to collect 
material for a whole series of books on Masonic history which 
have never been superseded or surpassed. Thev culminated in 
his great six-volume Hist ory of Freem asonry, published in 
18 8 2-1887. 

The Foundation of Quatuor Co r onati Lodge 

In 1884 nine Masons petitioned the Grand Master of the 
United Grand Lodge of England for a warrant of Constitution 
empowering them to meet as a regular lodge at Freemasons' 
Hall, London, on the first Wednesday of every month. 

The nine founding members included several masons whose 
names may be familiar to you. Perhaps the best known of them 
all in his own day, Walter (later Sir Walter) Besant 
(1836-1901), 48 years old, was a minor Victorian novelist. 
His interest in Masonry was slight, but he was something of a 
catch. The Rev. Adolphus Frederick Alexander Woodford 
(1821-1887), 63 years of age, an Anglican cleric, formerly a 
lieutenant in the Coldstream Guards, had single-handedly 
written Kenning's Masonic Cyclopaedia in 1878. William James 



21 



Hughan (1841-1911), 43 years of age, destined to retire from 
business as a textile merchant in four years, was already the 
author of several standard books on the evolution of Masonry 
and its early documents; in 1890, together with Henry L. 
Stillson, he would edit a large volume which is still often 
found in Masonic Libraries, History of Freemasonry and 
Concordant Orders . Robert Freke Gould (1836-1915), whom we 
have already met, was by now 48 years of age; he had retired 
from the army and was a practising lawyer. These brethren 
were joined by Major Sisson Cooper Pratt (1844-1919), 40 years 
old, Professor of Military History at the Royal Military 
Academy; William Harry Rylands (1847-1922), 37 years old, 
Secretary of the Society of Biblical Archaeology; his brother, 
John Paul Rylands (1846-1923) 38, Fellow of the Society of 
Antiquaries; and George William Speth (1847-1901), 37, a devoted 
Mason whose credentials were less impressive, but who would 
work himself to death as Secretary of the Lodge within fifteen 
years. And, as first Worshipful Master, they had a distin- 
guished soldier, Sir Charles Warren (1840-1927), 44 years old, 
who had conducted the Palestine Exploration in 1867-70, had 
served as an administrator and soldier in South Africa in 1876- 
79, and would in 1886 be named Chief Commissioner of the 
Metropolitan Police Force of London; it was he who led the 
investigation into the murders committed in 1888 by Jack the 
Ripper . 

The M.W. the Grand Master, H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, 
granted the Warrant of Constitution on November 28, 1884. 
Neither petition or warrant mentioned any peculiar character- 
istics or intentions of the lodge, but it was known in the 
Grand Lodge Offices that the petitioners hoped to meet together 
to discuss various matters of Masonic History. At the time 
that the Warrant was issued, the Master designate was absent 
in South Africa on a diplomatic and military mission, and the 
lodge could not be formed until his return. It was finally 
consecrated on January 12, 1886. The name chosen for it 
deserves a digression. 

The Legend of the Quatuor Corona ti 

In the early lives of the saints, to die for the faith is 
regarded as a sort of triumph, the culmination of a life of 
virtue, a consummation devoutly to be wished. Instead of 
saying, "He was butchered by his persecutors," the writers use 
various cheerful expressions. One is, "He won the crown of 
martyrdom." The Latin word for "crown" is corona , from which 
we get the words coronet, coronation, coronary, corollary, 
and so on; and those who are killed for being Christians are 
referred to as "the crowned ones," coronat i . Quatuor is the ■ 
Latin numeral "four," and is related to the Engl i sh~words 
quadruple, quadrangle, quadrilateral, quadr iphonic , and 
quadriplegic. So the name Quatuor C oronat i means "The four 
crowned martyrs;" and thereby hangeth a tale. 

Long ago, when the Roman Empire ruled the world, its great 
cities were filled with elegant stone buildings and beautiful 
stone statues. The raw material came from many places, 
including the marble quarries of Hungary. Dozens of stone- 
masons worked there, but there were four of outstanding ability, 
who were also accomplished sculptors. Their names were 
Claudius, Nicostratus, Symphorian, and Castorius. They were 
Christians, but in that world of paganism they kept their faith 



22 



secret. They converted another workman, Simplicius, who was 
baptized by the Bishop Quirrillus. So these five sculptors, 
all Christians, worked together as brethren. 

When the emperor Diocletian visited the Hungarian quarries 
in the year 302, he heard of the extraordinary skill and ability 
of these craftsmen. He set them various tasks, carving pillars 
adorned with chapiters, and marble finials, and moulded blocks, 
and antefixes, and statuettes, and lion-head waterspouts, all 
of which they accomplished to his entire satisfaction. Then 
he required them to carve a great statue of the god of healing, 
Aesculapius, but this they refused, for to do so would be to 
encourage the worship of false gods, and thus betray the sacred 
trust reposed in them. The Christians always made the sign of 
the cross before beginning their work, and so the pagan 
philosophers whispered in the Emperor's ear that their skill 
was due to magic. He reiterated his command to complete the 
statue, but the artists remained firm. Finally, incensed by 
their disobedience, he bade one of his officers, the tribune 
Lampadius, to examine them. Egged on by the pagan philosophers, 
Lampadius ordered the five to be sent to prison. But before 
they could be hauled away , he was struck dead in his very 
judgement seat. The emperor held the five responsible, and 
ordered them to be sealed alive in leaden coffins and cast into 
the river. Their bodies were not recovered for forty-two days. 
They won the crown of martyrdom on November 8 302. 

The emperor returned to Rome and in due course ordered 
a temple built there to the god Aesculapius. At its completion 
he proclaimed that all soldiers in the city should make offer- 
ings to the image of the god. But there were four veterans, 
Severus, Servianus, Carpophorus, and Victorinus, who were 
Christians and refused to do so. The emperor ordered them to 
be flogged to death with lead-tipped scourges, and their bodies 
to be cast to the dogs in the streets. This took place on 
Mo v ember 8 304 . 

Within a few years Pope Melchiades decreed that these two 
sets of martyrs, the five stonecutters and the four soldiers, 
who were killed on the same day two years aparts, should be 
commemorated together, and that they should (for some reason 
which escapes me) be called the four crowned ones. The four 
are really nine in number. 

Because the story begins in the quarries, the four crowned 
ones came to be regarded as the patron saints of stonemasons 
during the Middle Ages. The earliest of the Old Charges, the 
Regius Poem of 1390, immediately after the regulations devotes 
nearly forty lines (lines 497-534) to the four crowned ones. 
At the building of Eton College in the 1450's, one of the days on 
which the masons did not work was November 8, the feast of the 
Quatuor Coronati (Knoop- Jones , The Mediaeval Mason , page 107). 
The London Masons' Orders of 1481" required every fellow to 
attend mass on that feast day, under penalty of twelvepence 
( ibid . , page 108) . 

In 1886 when the new lodge of research was consecrated to 
the history of the craft, its charter members were nine in 
number, four of whom were soldiers. It was appropriate that 
the lodge should take the name Quatuor Coronati. 



- 23 - 



The Setting of the Pattern 

The first set of By-Laws of the lodge (April 7 1886) 
specified that it should meet only five times a year instead of 
monthly; it also determined that "The lodge shall at no time 
consist of more than forty members." This regulation is still 
in force after 94 years, but the limit has never been reached. 

The criteria for membership were established on September 
2 1886: "No brother or gentleman shall be admitted a member 
of the lodge unless he has contributed in some shape or other 
to literature (art or science) in general or to that of the 
Craft in particular." A candidate was to be judged on the basis 
of a piece of written work, which would be considered by a 
Committee consisting of the Master, the Wardens, and Past 
Masters. If the Committee approved unanimously , at the next 
meeting of the lodge the W.M. from the Chair would propose him 
for membership, seconded by one of the Wardens. 

On December 2 1886 the members voted "to form a Literary 
Society under the guidance and protection of the Lodge." 
Regulations were adopted at the next meeting (March 3 1887); 
the literary society was to be called the "Correspondence 
Circle." By that date thirty-seven applications had already 
been received. The Correspondence Circle clearly filled a 
real need, for a mere fifteen months later (June 25 1888) its 
numbers stood at 346. This was an insupportable burden on the 
Secretary, so on that date the system of Local Secretaries was 
instituted. Today there are 237 of them scattered all over the 
world. According to the latest figures available (January 1 
1978), membership in the Correspondence Circle stands at 12,567. 

The first paper delivered in lodge was "On Some Old 
Scottish Customs," by R.F. Could (June 3 1886). 

The first volume of the Transactions was published early in 
1889. It covered the first three years, and gave the texts of 
papers presented in lodge, as well as other essays which had 
been sent it. One interesting feature is the inclusion of 
comments on the papers. If the audience believed that a 
contribution deserved censure, they had no shyness in saying so. 
They were conscious of the fact that the lodge was breaking new 
ground by insisting on authentic history, and one commentator 
observed (June 2 1887) : 

"The fond illusions of one's youth are cruelly dispelled; 
no more can we believe that the Father of the human race 
held a Grand Lodge in the Garden of Eden; neither that 
Noah, its second Father, performed the rites of the Craft 
in the Ark, with the lion and the elephant alternately 
acting as Grand Tyler." 

The Lodge and its Books 

Quatuor Coronati Lodge has also been actively involved in 
the publication of other Masonic works. In the early years it 
arranged to print facsimiles of many rare old documents - 
copies of the Old Charges, Minute Books, Books of Constitution, 
and the like. Latterly it has publicized and distributed new 
texts, and reprinted certain standard works of earlier years. 
At the present time, for example, one may obtain nearly twenty 
books through the lodge, all of them excellent. 



- 24 - 



Quatuor Coronati has served as a meeting place for Masonic 
scholars, and has acted as a catalyst in inspiring students to 
make their work available toothers. Suppose you ask yourself, 
"What books on Masonry can profitably be put into the hands of 
the serious brother?" The two most useful all-round books are 
Freemasons' Guide and Compendium , by Bernard E. Jones (Master of 
Q.C . Lodge , 1961) ; and the Freemason at Work , by Harry Carr 
(Mastei 1959). The most authoritative history is by Robert 
Freke Gould (Master, 1887), particularly in the revised edition, 
prepared by Rev. Herber Poole (Master, 1928). The most readable 
short history is by F.L. Pick (Master, 1943) and Bro. Norman 
Knight. The standard History of Freemasonry in Canada is by 
John Ross Robertson (a member of the lodge). The authorized 
account of Freemasonry in the Province of Quebec is by A.J.B. 
Milborne (a member of the lodge) . Look at other standard works: 
A Commentary on the Free Masonic Ritual , by E.H. Cartwright 
(a member of the lodge) ; The Early Masonic Catechisms, by 
Douglas Knoop (Master, 1 9 3 5 ) , and Mr . Jones and Mr. FTamer, 
two non-Masons; King Solomon's Temple in the Masonic Tradition , 
by Alex Home (a member of the lodge); Symbolism in Craft 
Masonry , by Colin F.W. Dyer (Master, 1976) . And so on. 

Membership 

Since the year 1886,157 brethren have been elected to full 
membership. At present there are 28 members. It is an English 
lodge and so most of the members are English. Fifteen are 
from London or its immediate vicinity; 6 are from elsewhere in 
England; 2 are from other parts of the British Isles; one each 
from Germany, Switzerland, South Africa, the United States, and 
Canada. They include, of course, Harry Carr, the world's 
leading authority in the evolution of the Masonic ritual, who 
has spoken on lecture tours in Toronto three times in the past 
decade. There are four members who devote their working hours 
entirely to Masonry: Sir James Stubbs , the Grand Secretary of 
England (he was Knighted by the Queen in June of last year) ; 
the Librarion of Grand Lodge, Terry Haunch, and his assistant, 
John Hamill; and the lodge's Secretary and Editor, Cyril Batham. 
The present active members all have a wide background in Masonry 
but as well most of them are specialists in one or more areas. 
The W.M., Frederick Smyth, is an authority on Masonic music. 
The I. P.M., Ellic Howe, who has his own entry in the American 
encyclopaedia of Contemporary Authors , has made a particular 
study of the lunatic fringe of Masonry. The S.W., Harry 
Mendoza, is concerned with the York Rite. Colin Dyer knows 
about the development of the various rituals since the Union of 
1813. The Secretary, Cyril Batham, is especially concerned with 
the evolution of the Craft in France, and is in fact a Past 
Junior Warden of the Grande Loge Nationale Francaise. 

In some ways the lodge seems like a nonagenarian's 
playground. Only seven of the 28 members are under 60; the 
average is about 7f), and five are over 80. 

In all, there have been five members from Canada: our own 
Past Grand Master, John Ross Robertson (1841-1918), newspaperman 
and philanthropist; two very high-powered brethren from Quebec, 
R.J. Meekren (1876-1963); and A.J.B. Milborne (1888-1976); 
Gerard Brett (1915-1968), Director of the Royal Ontario Museum; 
and last November 8 - the Feast of Quatuor Coronati - I received 
the great honour of being elected to full membership, and being 
appointed Junior Deacon of the lodge. 



- 25 - 



Lodge Proceedings 

I have attended Quatuor Coronati twice, and might tell you 
a bit about the way it does things. Because of the tremendous 
amoint of paper work connected with the Correspondence Circle, 
the lo ' n e has permanent offices at No. 27, Great Queen Street 
in London. This is an old house, dating from about 1750, located 
five minutes walk from the Holborn Tube Station. Here on most 
days you can find the Secretary of the lodge working away in his 
office surrounded by books. The lodge holds its meetings across 
the road in one of the smaller rooms of Freemasons' Hall, which 
is a gigantic commemorative structure put up between the wars, 
and is worth a visit in any case. 

The meeting begins at 5:00 p.m. The room is similar to 
those in Canada, except for standard local variations. Instead 

~r l 4 -: „ *-i „ * „ r *-\ ^-i J „ ,- +■ „ i ,,;*-u -t-i — d„ 




d 

~ng 

board is uncovered by the Deacons. The dress is a bit more 
formal than we are used to, and consists of either a dark 
business suit with black tie and white gloves, or a director's 
suit, that is, grey striped trousers and black jacket. 

The speaker of the evening is placed to the right of the 
W.M. As soon as the business is completed, he reads his paper. 
Ithas been typeset and printed in proof before the meeting, and 
anyone may place an order for an advance copy. Then the 
speaker is thanked on motion of the W.M., seconded by the S.W., 
each offering any criticism that he wishes. Then any other 
brother in attendance may present his comments. The final 
person to speak is the Librarian and Curator of Grand Lodge, 
who puts on display a number of objects from his collections, 
and explains their relevance to the paper. 

The attendance both nights I was there numbered about 70: 
11 or 12 full members, and the remainder split between members 
of the Correspondence Circle, and visitors. It was a real 
international gathering. There were masons from all over the 
world; Norway, Germany, East Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, 
and well as Canada. 

After lodge, the brethren move next door to the Connaught 
Rooms, which are located on the site of the original Freemasons' 
Tavern, and are still the catering establishment associated 
with the Hall. Anyone may attend, provided he has made a 
reservation and prepared to pay the subscription, which currently 
runs to ten pounds ten shillings. 

The banquet too is fairly formal, with printed bill of fare, 
five courses, and wine. From time to time the I. P.M. will 
rise and say. ''The W.M. wishes to take wine with his Wardens," 
or "... with the speaker of the evening," or ... with the members 
of his mother lodge." Then all those so called upon will rise, 
raise their glasses to each other, and have a sip of wine. As 
well a number of toasts are proposed, more than we usually have 
in this jurisdiction. They include: 

(1) The Loyal Toast ['The Queen and the Craft"); 

(2) The Grand Master; 

(3) The Grand Officers; 



26 



(4) Holders of London Grand Rank; 

(5) The Worshipful Master; 

(6) The Visiting Brethren; 

(7) Absent Brethren; 

(8) Th^ Tyler's Toast (''To all poor and distressed 
Freemasons wheresoever scattered over the face of land or sea; 
wishing them a speeJy relief from all their sufferings and a 
safe return to their native land if they so desire') . 

After each toast, the person who has proposed it says 
"Good Fire, Brethren, and take the time from me.'' And then all 
the brethren, fitting the action to the word, react smartly in 
unison: "Point-Left-Right, Point-Left-Right, Point-Left -Right , 
One, Two!" Clap, Clap-clap-clap, Clap-clap-clap, Clap-clap- 
clap! There are no long speeches. 

After the banquet proceedings are complete, several of the 
members of the lodge usually adjourn across the street to a 
public house called "Hercules' Pillars," and continue their 
discussion over a foaming flagon of bitter. 

If you have the opportunity to visit Quatuor Coronati 
Lodge, I advise you to take it up. Should any of you chance to 
be in London in November 1983 I hope that you will make a point 
of attending the lodge. If the Lord tarry so long, if I keep 
my health, if trans -at lantic fares don't go up too much, if 
the lodge committee will overlook my chronic non-attendance,- and 
if the brethren are prepared in due course to express their 
confidence - a fightening lot of contingencies - there is a 
possibility that I shall be installed as Worshipful Master of 
Quatuor Coronati Lodge on the second Thursday of November 1983. 

Research Lodges 

Quatuor Coronati was the first research lodge in the world. 
Others were formed in its wake, the most active in England is 
Leicester Lodge of Research, No. 2429. The oldest now active 
in the United States was founded in 1931. In New Zealand there 
are about seven; Australia has several; British Columbia has 
one. Now at last our Grand Lodge has one, The Heritage, No. 730. 
And maybe I might say a word about it. It meets four times a year 
in Hespeler, an hour's drive away. It does not do degree work; 
its activity is chiefly in the historical line. Any Master 
Mason may join. I commend it to you; it's worthwhile, and it's 
very inexpensive. For further information contact the Secretary, 
V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos, 10 Mayfield Avenue, Guelph, NIG 2L8. Nearly 
all of these research lodges have their own publications. They 
vary considerably in the quality of their work; the oldest and 
best is Quatuor Coronati, No. 2076. 

Advantages of Membership 

I recommend that any serious Mason become a member of the 
Correspondence Circle. You will gain a number of privileges. 
You will receive the annual Transactions , a volume of some 300 
pages. Much of it will seem fairly technical; but still it 
generally includes several items that will interest the newest 
Mason. And it grows in interest as one's knowledge and 
experience expand; you go back to it again and again. 

For example, let's consider the most recent volume 
(No. 91 for 1978) which was distributed last November. It 



27 - 



includes an arti< 
Predecessors: Scottish Masons of about 1660." This is one of 
a series; each of them gives a readable outline of the way of 
life at the time, and summarizes what is known about Masonry then 
Bo you care about diet and personal hygiene in Scotland in 
1660? Here's what Bro. Jackson tells us. 

"The working man in Scotland, starting his day soon after 
dawn , breakfasted on coarse oatmeal bread and beer. 
Oatmeal also provided the main food of the mid-day meal 
and supper. Both meals might be augmented by cheese, fish 
(salted except near the sea) and, sometimes, meat once or 
twi^e a week in good periods of the year. It was a dull, 
unhealthy diet as vegetables, other than the kail which 
was sometimes stewed with the oatmeal, were not popular. 
Nevertheless, except in bad years, it was adequate" 
(p. 13). 

"Perhaps the most noticeable difference between home life 
in 1660 and that in modern times would be the rudimentary 
toilet and sanitary arrangements .... Frequent washing was 
thought to be unhealthy so personal ablutions ... (were) 
limited to the minimum. The result was that the Scot and 
his clothing, the latter made of greasy wool and impossible 
to clean, were extremely smelly.... 

"It was normal for the population of Edinburgh to dispose 
of their sewage by throwing it out of the window with the 
cry of "Gardez- loo . " A more sophisticated method was to 
build a closet jutting out over one of the wynds (lanes) 
so that the excrement could fall directly on the heads of 
pedestrians and not foul the walls" (p. 13). 

Another item in this volume is the first salvo in a knock- 
down drag-out battle that will continue for some time. The 
usual view today is that modern Freemasonry is descended from 
the stone-masons ' gui Ids of the Middle Ages. Bro. Eric Ward has 
written an article denying this, and arguing that our masonry 
cannot be traced back any earlier than 1650. It provoked some 
fairly vigorous debate. 

As well, every volume contains the Prestonian Lecture for 
the year. Do you know what it is? The United Grand Lodge of 
England in some ways seems less authoritarian than ours. It 
does not dictate the ritual to be used, nor does it have any 
organized system of Masonic Education. In fact, virually the 
only educational activity it sponsors is the appointment of 
the Prestonian Lecturer, who delivers the only lectures given 
"with the authority of the Grand Lodge." A different brother 
is appointed each year - it is considered a high honour to be 
chosen - and he prepares an adress on a topic of broad appeal, 
and presents it several times in different lodges. Anyway, 
the Prestonian Lecture in the volume under discussion deals with 
the office of Grand Steward - its origin, and its evolution 
during early days. In England, apparently, this is a real office 
with some responsibility, and not (as here) an empty recognition 
of past services . 

Or again, in some English lodges one of the last toasts at 
the banquet is proposed by the Tyler, in this form: 



Dear Brethren of the Mystic Tie, the night is waning 
fast; Our duty's done, our feast is o'er; this song 
must be the last. 'Good night, good night.' Once 
more, once more repeat the farewell strain: 'Happy to 
meet, sorry to part, happy to meet again!' 

Volume 91 traces the origin of these lines. They are the final 
stanza of a poem composed for an English lodge in Calcutta in 
the 1840's. 

Or another interesting item. Did you know that the author 
of Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Masonry was a member of our Grand 
Lodge? Only very briefly, to be sure. He was a charter member 
of the Canadian lodge in Jerusalem in 1873, together with 
assorted Past Grand Master from Canada and various American 
jurisdictions. They were all suspended (apparently N.P.D.) 
in 1874. 

May I tell you about a few other items of general interest 
in recent volumes? Volume 90, for 1977, has one of Cosby 
Jackson's social histories, dealing with the English Mason of 
1885. The Prestonian Lecture is concerned with the history of 
the Outer Guard or Tyler. Bro. John Hamill discusses the 
gradual development of the warrants issued to lodges by Grand 
Lodge . 

Volume 89, for 1976, has a splendid article by Harry Carr 
on the Evolution of the Installation Ceremony. And there is 
a fascinating review of the relationship of the Catholic Church 
and Masonry. You may recall that in 1738 the Pope issued a 
proclamation that any Catholic who joined Masonry would be 
automatically excommunicated. This prohibition was reiterated 
on a number of occasions, and in the Church laws which are now 
valid, that is, the Code of Canon Law of 1917, No. 2335, the ban 
is still in effect against Masons and ,: other associations of the 
same type, which plot against the Church or the lawful civil 
power." From I960 on, there has been a gradual softening of 
attitude on the part of the church. Finally in 1974 an 
official letter was sent by Cardinal Seper, Prefect of the 
Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, to all 
bishops, stating that the regulation in question was open to 
interpretation . 

Sometimes it takes a while for the effect of certain 
important decisions to be felt. This seems to be a matter of 
great importance to the Craft, and we might take a bit more 
time over it. I have not tried to obtain a copy of the Vatican's 
letter as it was promulgated in Canada. But by the courtesy of 
Bro. Harvey Brown, I do have the text of the letter to the 
bishops of the United States, and I thought I'd like to share 
it with you, even though it is not published in the lodge 
transactions. It is in Latin, but I translate: 

"SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH 

Rome, 18, VII . 1974. 

To the Most Eminent Lord. 

Lord Cardinal John Joseph Krol, 

President, Conference of Bishops, 

Washington, U.S.A. Reference: 272/22 



29 



Most Eminent Lord: 

Several bishops from this Sacred Congregation have been 
conducting an enquiry with regard to the authority and inter- 
pretation of the Code of Canon Law , Canon 2335, which forbids 
Catholics under pain of excommunication to join Masonic lodges 
of similar bodies. 

During the course of a prolonged investigation, the Holy 
See has several times consulted those Bishops' Conferences 
that are chiefly concerned with the subject, in order that it 
might learn more clearly the nature and present activity of 
these lodges, as well as the opinion of the bishops. 

The great diversity of replies, reflecting the different 
situation in each country, does not allow the Holy See to change 
the general rule which has been in for„ce up to the present. It 
will therefore continue in force until such time as a new canon 
law is published by proper Pontifical Commission named to 
revise the Code. 

At the same time, in considering individual cases one must 
bear in mind that the penal law is subject to a strict inter- 
pretation. Accordingly it is safe to teach and utilize the 
judgement of those authorities who hold that the aforesaid 
canon 2335 refers only to Catholics who join groups that 
actually work against the Church. 

The prohibition against joining any Masonic lodge still 
remains in effect for priests, members of rel igious orders and 
secular institutions. 

In communicating which, I express my profound respect for 
you, and I remain, 

Your servant in the Lord, 
Franjo, Cardinal Seper, Prefect. '' 

This document, in effect, writes Fini s to 236 years of 
hostility on the part of the Catholic Church; and we may hope 
that more and more promising young men will join our order from 
those quarters that have hitherto been closed to us. 

Well then, in every issue of the Transactions , you will 
find something that will interest you, and much th"at will 
instruct you. 

Then, another privilege, five times a year, you receive 
the lodge summons. It is not just a notice of meeting. It 
regularly includes one or two questions and answers, usually 
dealing with procedures. You have the right to purchase any 
other publications of the lodge, some of which are not other- 
wise available. They include some wonderful books! If you 
have any questions about Masonry, you may submit them to 
Quatuor Coronati Lodge for an answer. If you are in London, 
you may attend meetings, and also (at your own expense) the 
banquets. There is a joining fee of $6.00; and the Annual 
dues amount to $12.00. 



- 30 - 

How to Join 

If you wish to join the Correspondence Circle, you can 
write directly to the lodge, and pay the fees in Sterling 
currency. However, the local Secretaries are very helpful 
and it is more convenient to work through them. In fact, if 
you do contact the lodge on your own, you will still be referred 
to your nearest local Secretary. To facilitate matters you may 
contact any of the following directly: 

Ontario East 

Brian D. Stapley, 5785 Yonge Street, Apt. 327, 
Willowdale, M2M 3V2 

Ontario North 

John E. Taylor, P.O. Box 39, 

Hilton Beach, POR 1G0 

Ontario South and West 

Prof. Jacob Pos, 10 Mayfield Avenue, 
Guelph, NIG 2L8 

Metropolitan Toronto 

Prof. J.S. Basarke,59 Sandbourne Crescent, 
Willowdale, M2J 3A5 

Cone 1 us io n 

Freemasonry. I suppose, means different things to different 
people. The more doctrinaire among us will give the authorized 
definition: ''a beautiful system of morality veiled in allegory 
and illustrated by symbols." And that is certainly true. A 
lodge is also an affinity group, a body of men who find each 
other's company congenial. When it ceases to be that, it 
will cease to exist. 

Masonry also carries within it an impulse for study and 
self improvement - an aspect that is often forgotten in this 
country. It is qf course possible to learn about various topics 
by having persons of skill and ability address us. We've all 
heard fine talks given by politicians, scientists, and other 
public figures. But in my opinion, the most fitting object of 
study in a Masonic lodge is Freemasonry itself. If you are 
interested in learning more about Masonry - not the mechanics 
of the ritual, or the so-called Secret doctrine of the ages, or 
the more ridiculous excesses of symbolism - try Quatuor 
Coronati Lodge; for nearly a century it has been the home of 
the school of authentic history. You will not be disappointed. 



- 31 - 

IN MEMORIUM 

Brother Walter Henry Benallick 

Member of Trillium Lodge No. 724 

Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge No. 730 

Passed to the Grand Lodge above 
November 28, 1980 

We cherish his memory in our hearts 

* * * 

COMING EVENTS 



FEBRUARY 28, 1981 (Saturday) - Sixteenth Regular Meeting of The 
Heritage Lodge will be held in the Masonic Temple, 453 
Dufferin Ave., London, Ontario, at 2:00 p.m. Brother 
Timothy H. Barnes will present a paper titled "The Great 
Lights; An Historical and Symbolic Interpretation". 

MARCH 18, 1981 (Wednesday) - Seventeenth Regular Meeting of The 
Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple, Cambridge, commencing at 7:30 p.m. Bro. 
T.H. Barnes will present a sequel paper titled "The 
Great Lights of Masonry; Some Queries and Facts". 

MARCH 18, 1981 (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge will be held in conjunction with 
the Seventeenth Regular Meeting (note above). The Lodge 
will be opened promptly at 7:30 p.m. 

PROPOSED PAPERS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS 



1 . Quasi Masonic 

the materia 
to put it a 

2. Women Freemaso 

possibly fo 

3. Lodges formerl 

in the Prov 
John E. Tay 

4. Masonic Resear 

Balfour LeG 

5. The Masonic Ca 

Chief, by V 

6. Ant i -Masonic G 

etc . , sugge 
a volunteer 

7. Important Maso 

Canada, 179 

8. Lodge Tracing 

Jacob Pos. 

presentatio 

interesting 

NOTE - Anyone wish 
give sugges 
or interest 
touch with 
MIM 34B; ph 



Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge. Some of 

1 has been researched, but we need a volunteer 
11 together. 

ns in Ontario, by R.W.Bro. Lawrence Runnalls, 
r our Regular Meeting in September, 1981. 

y on the Register of the Grand Lodge of Canada 
ince of Ontario, and now struck off. By Bro. 
lor. 

ch Lodges - An Up-To-Date Review, by R.W.Bro. 
resley . 

reer of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian 
.W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

roups - Individual, Political and Ecclesiastical 
sted by R.W.Bro. E.J. Burns Anderson. We need 

ns of the First Provincial Grand Lodge in 

2 - 1822, by W.Bro. Robert Butler. 

Boards - History and Symbolism, by V. W.Bro. 
Bro. Pos would like to make this an illustrated 
n, anyone having knowledge of unique and 
tracing boards, please bring it to his attention 

ing to do research, make a paper presentation, 
tions for future masonic papers or having novel 
ing ideas for masonic research, please get in 

R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, 46 Muir Dr., Scarborough, 
one (416) 261-8147. 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1980 - 1981 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 

59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R. W. Bro. Talbot L. Peyton 

46 Culpepper Dr., Waterloo, N2L 5L1 

LODGE OFFICERS 
1980 - 1981 



W.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


I. P.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.W. 


W . Bro . 


J.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


J.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


I.G. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.S. 


W.Bro. 


J.S. 


R.W.Bro. 



Ronald E. Groshaw 
Donald S. Grinton 
George E. Zwicker 
Balfour LeGresley 
David C. Bradley 
C. Edwin Drew 
Robert S. Throop Organist 
Albert A. Barker Historian 
Edsel C. Steen 



Tyler 


R. 


.W.Bro 


Sec'y 


V 


.W.Bro 


A/Sec' y 


R 


. W . Bro 


Treas. 


R 


. W . Bro 


D.C. 


R 


.W.Bro 


Chap. 




W . Bro 


•ganist 


R 


. W . Bro 



W.Bro. 



C.F. Grimwood 
Jacob Pos 
E.V. Ralph 
G.J. Powell 
Keith Flynn 
Rev. G. Rivers 
Len R. Hertel 
Henry G. Edgar 



LODGE COMMITTEES FOR 1980 - 1981 

GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker (S.W.); 
Secretary, R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph; members include all 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees, Officers and Past Masters. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph; 

R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley; V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; R.W. 
Bro. Bert A. Mennie; and R.W.Bro. Robert S. Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, W.Bro. Albert A. Barker (SS); 
R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen (J.S.); Local Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn (DC); R.W.Bro. Charles 
F. Grimwood (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman*, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce; R.W.Bro. 
Gary J. Powell; and V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn; W.Bro. Ron G. Cooper. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Paul Engel; R.W.Bro. Balfour 

LeGresley; R.W.Bro. James Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley; 
and W.Bro. Kenneth G. Bartlett. 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy 
S. Sparrow; and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley; R.W. 
Bro. Edsel C. Steen; and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

BY-LAWS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson; V. W.Bro. Randall Langs; 
and V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after a Brother's 
name, this is an automatic appointment as defined in the 
Lodge By-Laws. The duties of all Lodge Committees are out- 
lined in Article VIII, Sections 1 to 11. 



<Proceetringa 

Zbt heritage Xofcige iSo-730 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Ronald E. Groshaw, W.M. 
31 Princess Margaret Bd 
Islington, Ontario 
M9A 1Z5 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Avenue 
Guelph, Ontario 
NIG 2L8 



Home 
Bus. 


(416) 233-9429 
(416) 247-7426 


S^«<-M G^^ 


Home 
Bus. 


(519) 821-4995 
(519) 824-4120 


Vol. 


04, No. 03 Cambridge, 


Ontario, 


Canada 


March, 1981 



This Bulletin contains the summons for the next two 
Regular Meetings, the General Purpose Committee Meeting, the 
Proceedings of the Sixteenth Regular Meeting held on Sat. 
February 28, 1981, and the Seventeenth Regular Meeting held 
on Wednesday, March 18, 1981, also notices of coming events. 

PLEASE NOTE: The opinions expressed by the Speakers, Review- 
ers and Participants in the papers and discus- 
sions presented in these Proceedings are not 
necessarily those of The Heritage Lodge. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 



By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. 
Groshaw, you are hereby requested to attend the Eighteenth 
Regular Meeting of the Lodge to be held in the Masonic 
Temple, Richmond, Ontario, on: 

SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 16th, 1981, at 9:00 A.M. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. We 
have been invited to Richmond on behalf of Goodwood Lodge 
No. 159. On that occasion, V.W.Bro. Alf Harrington of 
Goodwood Lodge will present a Paper outlining the Early 
History of Freemasonry in the Ottawa Area. 

This Special Meeting has a twofold purpose; first it 
will afford an opportunity for the Members of The Heritage 
Lodge in Eastern Ontario, who find it difficult to travel 
to our Regular Meeting Place, to meet the Worshipful Master 
and Officers of the Lodge, and second; the Worshipful Master 
is hopeful of receiving a large number of visitors from the 
area as well as those who may wish to stay over following 
the Grand Master's Reception in Smiths Falls the night 
before. 



At this meeting we shall also be balloting on 26 
Applications for affiliation. The names of the Brethren 
applying for membership are listed on pages 5 and 6 
of these Proceedings, Vol. 4, No. 3. 

REGULAR MEETING IN MAY 

The Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. R. E. Groshaw hereby 
informs you that the Nineteenth Regular Meeting of The 
Heritage Lodge will oe held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple located at the North-East corner of the intersection 
of Highways No. 401 and No. 24, on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 20th, 1981 AT 7:30 P.M. 

for the purpose of introducing and transacting such business 
as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. This will 
be a combined meeting with the General Purpose Committee. 
The Lodge will be called off for a period of time sufficient 
to conduct the affairs of the Committee in a manner similar 
to that of the combined meeting of March 18, 1981. However, 
as there will not be a paper presented at this meeting, 
this should be a good opportunity to discuss a number of 
important topics that will affect the future of the Lodge. 

GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE MEETING 

By request of the Chairman of the Committee on General 
Purposes, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker , I have been asked to 
remind you of an important meeting of the Committee to be 
held in conjunction with the Regular Meeting of the Lodge 
on Wednesday, May 20, 1981, in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple, Cambridge. 

Chairmen of the various Lodge Committees are asked to 
communicate with the members of their respective committees 
to. discuss their program for the coming year (1981-82), and 
to submit a report complete with a proposed budget. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 



V. W.Bro. J. Pos, 
Secretary. 



WHAT IS FREEMASONRY? 

The late Bro. C.C. Hunt, former Grand Secretary of Iowa, 
gives the following definition: "Freemasonry is an organized 
society of men symbolically applying the principles of 
operative masonry and architecture to the science and art 
of character building." 



_ 3 _ 

SIXTEENTH REGULAR MEETING 
PROCEEDINGS 



The Sixteenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 
730, G.R.C., was held in the Masonic Temple, 453 Dufferin 
Avenue, London, Ontario, Saturday afternoon, February 28, 
1981, with 10 Officers, 51 Members and 76 Visitors for a 
total of 136 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 2:05 p.m. 
by the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw who 
welcomed the Brethren and expressed his delight in seeing 
such a vast array of Masons from far and near and hoped 
that all would benefit from the special program arranged 
for the occasion. 

CONFIRMING MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Fred D. Gegenschatz, 
seconded by R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton, that the minutes of 
the Fifteenth Regular Meeting of the Lodge, held November 
19, 1980, be confirmed as circulated in the Lodge Proceedings 
(Vol. 4, No. 2). Motion carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From the Office of the Grand Secretary, dated Nov. 25, 

1980, granting Special Dispensation for the various 
officers listed in our correspondence of Nov. 15, 1980, 
to hold office in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, for the 
ensuing Masonic year. 

2. From R.W.Bro. William Deller, General Chairman of 
Masonic Education for London East and London West 
Districts dated December 29, 1980, confirming arrange- 
ments for our Regular Meeting on February 28, 1981. 

3. From the Office of the Grand Secretary, dated Jan. 6, 

1981, approving amendments to the Lodge By-Laws, as 
passed in Lodge at the Regular Meeting of Nov. 19, 1980. 

4. From R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph, dated Jan. 8, 1980, outlining a 
number of recommendations to improve the operations of 
the Lodge and a suggested list of 11 priorities. 

5. From the Office of the Grant Secretary, dated Jan. 9, 
1981, granting Special Dispensation for change of 
location of a Regular Meeting to be held on February 
28, 1981, in the Masonic Temple at 453 Dufferin Avenue, 
London, Ontario. 



- 4 



6. Copy of a letter from Bro. Blake Galloway, suggesting 
the site of the original formation of the Grand Lodge 
of Canada, on the corner of John and Main Streets, 
Hamilton, Ontario, as a possible location for a 
Masonic Museum. 

7. From R.W.Bro. Ron Groshaw, Chairman of the Grand Lodge 
Committee on Blood Donors, dated Jan. 23, 1981 and 
addressed to all Lodge Secretaries encouraging them to 
read the full report of the Committee at their next 
Regular Meeting. 

8. From R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod, Grand Historian and Chair- 
man of the Committee on Masonic Education, suggesting 
that the Lodge proceed with the proposed Bulletin on 
the "Lodge Historian" . 

9. From W.Bro. Bruce Miller, Waterloo District Secretary, 
advising of the number of tickets available for the 
Grand Master's Banquet in July, 1981. 

MOTION RE CORRESPONDENCE 

Moved by R.W.Bro. G.R. Jackson, seconded by R.W.Bro. 
D.C. Bradley, that the correspondence as received be 
processed in the usual manner. Motion carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $658.67 were 
presented, and on a motion by W.Bro. Henry Armstrong, 
seconded by W.Bro. Wm. T. Boratynee were passed and ordered 
paid: 

Secretary's Account - 

Postage up to Feb. 28, 1981 $ 60.38 
Additional Membership Ledger 31.03 $ 91.41 

Mrs. S. Bushen, Guelph 

Typing Nov. Proceedings 31 pages 31.00 

House of Print, Guelph 

1000 Application forms 49.56 

1000 Letterheads 65.89 

450 Inserts for Nov. Proceedings 37.91 
1000 Sheets typing paper 26.25 

450 Proceedings (32 pages) 247.50 427.11 

Guelph Printing Service 

1500 printed envelopes 6 1/2" x 

9 1/2" 109.15 

TOTAL $658.67 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for Affiliation were received as follows: 



1. BJERKNES, Aage, P.G.R.; Camp Burford, Ontario, Age 60; 
Retired; member of Golden Rule Lodge No. 409, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. George Zwicker and W.Bro. W. J. 
Boston. 

2. BROOMFIELD, William H., D.D.G.M.; R.R. #2, Box 31, 
Baltimore; Age 48; Mill Wright; member of St. John's 
Lodge No. 17, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. Robert 
Throop and R. W.Bro. W. J. Dickinson. 

3. LARMER, J. Robert, P.D.D.G.M.; R.R. #1, Millbrook; 
Age 73; member of J.B. Hall Lodge No. 145, G.R.C; 
recommended by W.Bro. George Zwicker and R. W.Bro. James 
H. Hutchinson. 

4. PELL, John Gerald, D.D.G.M.; 1978 Arch Street, Ottawa, 
Age 50; Statistician Economist; member of Lodge of 
Fidelity No. 231, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. 
Ronald E. Groshaw and R. W.Bro. G. Robt. Jackson. 

5. STANDRING, Frank, Albert, P.D.D.G.M. 318 Wharmcliffe 
Rd.N., London; Age 64; Retired; member of Temple Lodge 
No. 597, G.R.C.,; recommended by R. W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson 
and R. W.Bro. Wm. Pellow. 

6. GOURLIE, Norman Campbell, P.G.A.O.; 27 Khartoum Ave., 
Scarborough; Age 65; Retired; member of Tuscan Lodge 
No. 54, G.R.C; recommended by R. W.Bro. Ronald E. 
Groshaw and W.Bro. George Blackie. 

7. HARRINGTON, Alfred Edward, P.G.S.; R.R. #3, Richmond; 
Age 71; Retired; member of Goodwood Lodge No. 159, 
G.R.C; recommended by Bro. Glenson T. Jones and R.W. 
Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

8. RICKWARD, Robert George, P.G.S.; Box 404, 16 Douglas 
Rd. , Oak Ridges; Age 59; Carpenter; member of Robertson 
Lodge No. 292, G.R.C; recommended by Bro. Russell 
Varley and R.W. Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

9. BECKETT, Gilbert D.W., P.M.; 2207-900 Dynes Rd . , 
Ottawa; Age 71; Retired; member of Rideau Lodge No. 
595, G.R.C; recommended by Bro. Glenson T. Jones and 
W.Bro. Robert F Gordon. 

10. BUSCOMBE, Edwin George, P.M.; Ill North Carson St., 
Toronto; Age 62; Salesman; member of High Park Lodge 
No. 531, G.R.C; recommended by Bro. Russell Varley 
and W.Bro. George Blackie. 

11. CLARK, Robert J., W.M.; 45 Spencer Cres., London; 
Age 49; Mechanic; member of Kilwinning Lodge No. 64, 
G.R.C; recommended by R.W. Bro. E.S.P. Carson and 
R.W. Bro. Don Emerick. 

12. GREENHOUGH, Wilfred Thomas; P.M.; P.O. Box 82, 
Grafton; Age 68; Retired; member of St. John's Lodge 
No. 17, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. George Zwicker 
and R.W. Bro. James H. Hutchinson. 



13. MACKENZIE, Malcolm, P.M.; 5 Fleet St., Bowmanville; 
Age 66; Retired; member of Jerusalem Lodge No. 31, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. George Zwicker and R.W. 
Bro. James H. Hutchinson. 

14. ROUNTREE, Brian, P.M.; #18-121 Nickel Rd., Thompson, 
Manitoba; Age 32; Teacher; member of Dominion Lodge 
No. 598, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. James N. Hayes 
and W.Bro. Thomas S. Crowley. 

15. SPENCE, Robert R. , P.M.; 41 Wellwood St., Hamilton; 
Age 65; Retired; member of St. John's Lodge No. 40, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. H.G. Edgar and R.W. 
Bro. W. James Curtis. 

16. DAVIS, Gene Emerson, M.M. ; 29 Khartoum Ave., Scar- 
borough; Age 45; Assembler; member of Tuscan Lodge No. 
541, G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. Russell Varley and 
R.W. Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

17. HAYNES, Morley Crawford, M.M. ; 239 Oxford St. E. , 
London; Age 60; Retired; member of Union Lodge No. 
380, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. T.A. Johnson and 
R.W. Bro. E.S.P. Carson. 

18. LANCASTER, Robert George, M.M. ; 58 Centre Cres., London; 
Age 53; Teacher; member of Nilestown Lodge No. 345, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. T.A. Johnson and R.W. 
Bro. E.S.P. Carson. 

19. SANDERS, Gordon P., M.M. ; 37 Beaconsfield Ave., London; 
Age 72; Retired; member of King Solomon's Lodge No. 378 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. E.S.P. Carson and W. 
Bro. T.A. Johnson. 

REPORT OF GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

No report at this time. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

1. Brief discussion concerning the invitation from Goodwood 
Lodge No. 159, Richmond, to hold our Regular Meeting 

in May in Eastern Ontario. 

MOTION RE: REGULAR MEETING IN MAY 

Regularly moved by V. W.Bro. Kenneth H. Clark, 
seconded by R.W. Bro. Bill Isbister to accept the invita- 
tion from Goodwood Lodge. Motion carried. Worshipful 
Master instructed the Lodge Secretary to request a 
Dispensation from Grand Lodge to hold our Regular 
Meeting in Richmond on May 16, 1981. 

2. The subject of the proposed Bulletin re: Lodge 
Historian was presented and, discussed. 

MOTION RE: PUBLICATION OF "LODGE HISTORIAN" BULLETIN 

Regularly moved by R.W. Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 
seconded by W.Bro. George Zwicker that, The Worshipful 



- 7 - 



Master and Secretary, with such assistance as may be 
required, be empowered to have the proposed bulletin 
on the 'Lodge Historian 1 printed, and 500 copies 
produced and sold for a price sufficient to cover the 
cost of publication and distribution. Motion carried. 

3. The Worshipful Master discussed the progress on the 
proposed Masonic Museum in the Black Creek Pioneer 
Village and indicated that he had already received a 
pledge of $100.00 toward the project. The subject was 
to be discussed further at the next General Purpose 
Committee Meeting in March. 



BALLOTING 

On a motion by R.W.Bro. Arthur W. Watson and R.W.Bro. 
Frank J. Bruce it was approved to ballot collectively. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applications the 
Worshipful Master declared the following Brethren eligible 
for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., by 
Affiliation, and requested that each new member affix his 
signature in the Lodge Register at his earliest convenience 
in token of submission to the Lodge By-Laws: 

R.W.Bros. Morley John Kinnee, William Russell Pellow, 
Norman Richard Strutt, and Robert C. Wright. 

V.W.Bros. Leonard E. Andrews, Laurie Brandridge, George A. 
Marr, and Gordon Henry Wilker. 

W.Bros. David Sidney Amis, Geoffrey D. Cameron, Norman Camp, 
George William Chambers, Donald L. Cosens, John Herbert 
Eagleson, Allyn Ralph Fast, David Robertson Gillelan, George 
Laurie Given, James Alan Ham, James F. Johnson, Edwin Frank 
Joyce, John D. MacKenzie, William Leonard McNeil, Frederick 
W. Penrose, Walter Gifford Scott, Franklin Blair Small, 
John Watson and Allan E. Wilhelm. 

Bros. Timothy Harold Barnes, Richard James Dengate, 
Melvyn James Duke, Daniel George Erwin, David Gordon Fletcher, 
Denis Michael Gabrielle, Kenneth S. Gillis, John Henry Hogg, 
John Lazlo Hunter, David G. Lawrence, William A. Martin, 
Albert Edward Rhodes, Raymond Pritchard Rivers and James 
William Sefton. 

At 2:57 p.m. the Lodge was called from labour to 
refreshment for the space of 10 minutes and on returning to 
labour at 3:07 p.m. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw continued with 
the reception of visitors. 



RECEIVING VISITORS 

At 3:10 p.m. V.W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown, P.G.D.C., 
acting as the Director of Ceremonies was admitted to intro- 
duce 20 Worshipful Masters accompanied by a large group of 
visiting Brethren. Approximately 15 Worshipful Masters 
were present from London East and London West and the others 



from Windsor, Sarnia, Hamilton and Ontario Districts. 

V.W.Bro. Brown was again admitted to present R.W.Bro. 
Hugh M. Cree, D.D.G.M. of London East and R.W.Bro. R.W. 
James MacRae, D.D.G.M. of London West accompanied by 31 
present and past Grand Lodge Officers. 

All Brethren received the time honoured welcome as 
traditional in The Heritage Lodge and the hand of Brother- 
hood was extended to each by the Worshipful Master who then 
called on R.W.Bro. MacRae. 

R.W.Bro. MacRae, with gavel in hand, welcomed the 
Brethren to the Masonic Temple in London and congratulated 
the Heritage Lodge on such an excellent beginning. Bro. 
MacRae gave tribute to R.W.Bro. Wm. Deller and R.W.Bro. 
Ed Carson for their efforts in bringing the meeting about. 

The Worshipful Master, after thanking the London 
Brethren for their kind hospitality then called on R.W. 
Brother A. Watson to attend the Altar. 



AT THE ALTAR 

Reading: Isaiah 40: 28-31. 

Brethren: 

In a day when so many agencies seem determined to 
spread hate, distrust and bigotry only by a staunch convic- 
tion can we hope to hold our own in the struggle. As 
Masons we are admonished to give up every selfish propensity 
that might injure others and to hold the scales of justice 
with an equal poise. We are challenged then to follow the 
principles of masonry. 

Our need today is to quit building numbers only and 
build men. The world needs men who will go forward in 
fellowship, understanding and dedication. Masonry ought 
to challenge men to do so. There ought to be such a 
challenge that we cannot brush it aside easily or avoid it 
in some other way. 

As M.W.Bro. S. Leach, a P.G.M. of Saskatchewan, said: 
"Our fraternity must be like the eagle, spread its wings, 
display its great power and strive for the lofty peaks of 
achievement, where rests the destiny of our Craft." 

This was followed by a prayer. 



PAPER PRESENTATION 

At 3:26 p.m., the Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. 
Frank Bruce, Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Information 
to proceed with the Paper Presentation Program. R.W.Bro. 
Bruce outlined the general procedure and then called on R.W. 
Bro. E.S.P. Carson to introduce the Speaker, Brother T.H. 
Barnes, who presented the following paper: 



- 9 - 

THE GREAT LIGHTS OF MASONRY: A HISTORICAL 
AND SYMBOLIC INTERPRETATION 



INTRODUCTION 

The Great Lights are the dominant, most powerful 
symbols of Craft Masonry. They comprehend, I believe, the 
essential elements of our system, involving the concepts 
of the attainment of personal virtue, moral rectitude of 
conduct towards our fellow human beings, and reverence 
for God and His works. 

These symbols are, in fact, crucial to Masonry as we 
recognize it in and beyond this jurisdiction. The 1929 
declaration of the basic principles of the Craft by the 
Grand Lodges of England, Scotland, and Ireland stated that 
a belief in the G.A.O.T.U. and His revealed will, the 
obligation of candidates on or within full view of the open 
V.S.L., and the display of the three Great Lights of Masonry 
in the Lodge at work are fundamental requirements for the 
maintenance of fraternal relations. Since then, the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in Ontario and others in communication with 
these bodies have adopted this policy. 1 

In this paper I will discuss the Great Lights from 
both an historical and symbolic perspective. From the 
historical viewpoint, the evolution of these emblems in 
the Craft ritual, collectively and individually, will be 
considered. Following this, I will interpret the symbolism 
of the Great Lights in the context of the Light metaphor, 
the allegory of the Temple, and the concept of progression 
in Masonic knowledge. 

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 

General 

The working tools of operative Masonry are of great 
antiquity. The Square, Compasses, and other implements 
may be seen on the tombs of ancient Roman stonemasons, and 
the Square and Compasses can even be found conjoined in the 
arms of individual stonemasons of the sixteenth and seven- 
teenth centuries. 2 The Compasses are prominently displayed 
on the coat of arms, dating from 1472, of the Masons Company 
of London (this tool is also found, however, on the arms of 
other contemporary guilds, such as those of the carpenters 
and the joiners of London.) 3 Nevertheless, there is no 
indication of esoteric significance. 

Operative Masonry, insofar as existing evidence of the 
period prior to 1700 can establish, involved no moralizing 
upon the working tools. The Regius Poem, circa 1390, the 
Cooke MS., circa 1410, and later operative documents contain 
moral precepts but no symbolism of the tools. 4 The exception 
to the rule is the old brass Square, recovered from the 
foundation of Baal's Bridge in Limerick and dated 1517, 
which discovery reminds us that no general statement on this 
point may be made with complete confidence; the simple 



10 - 



inscription is meaningful to every Mason today: 

"I will strive to live 
With love & care 
Upon the level 
By the square" 5 

Regrettably, there are some grounds for doubt as to the 
authenticity of this artifact. 

The symbolic interpretation of the Great Lights is, 
then, a comparatively recent addition to our Masonic tradi- 
tion — a product of eighteenth-century thought. The preceed- 
ing Puritan era in Britain, in fact, had been quite antagon- 
istic to symbolism, it having been dismissed generally as 
a Papist practice. However, the arrival of the eighteenth 
century brought with it a remarkable change in attitude. 
Previous generations of Britons had been preoccupied with 
vast and intricate metaphysical questions, and had gone to 
war for the sake of matters of theology and church government, 
That era had been abruptly transormed in the wake of the 
Newtonian scientific revolution. Men turned from ultimate 
questions to explore the ethical and social problems of 
this earthly realm. It was the age of the brilliant political 
pamphlet, the moral essay, and the instructive tale. It 
was the time of dawning doubt and enquiry, fated to culminate 
in the industrial, American, and French revolutions. It 
was also a relatively pleasant period of optimism and 
civilized worldiness. In all, it was a time conducive to 
moralizing and symbolism. 

Evolution of the "Lights" in Masonic Ritual 

The "Lights" or "Great Lights" meant something alto- 
gether different from the V.S.L., the Square, and the 
Compasses until sometime between 1745 and 1760. The 
earliest catechisms, dated between 1696 and 1723, generally 
refer to "three Lights", i.e., the Master, Wardens and 
Fellowcraft,6 although the Sloan MS. (c. 1700) states the 
Lights to be "Sun, Master, and Square." The three Lights 
are the "Father, Son and Holy Ghost" in two texts of 1724 
and 1725. 7 In three catechisms of 1724-6, there are 
actually twelve Lights: 

"Father, Son, Holy Ghost, Sun, Moon, Master Mason, 
Square, Rule, Plum(b), line, Mell (= maul), and 
Chizzel. " 8 

From this point on, from the Wilkinson MS. of 1727 to 
the French exposure, Le Macon demasque of 1751, the three 
Lights or Great Lights are the "Sun, Moon, and Master" (of 
the Lodge). It is only in 1760, with the publication of 
Three distinct knocks , that the Great Lights as we know them 
appear. y Even as late as 1772, William Preston in his 
First Lecture would refer to these symbols not as "Great" , 
but as the "three principal lights in Masonry, "10 and later 
as the "furniture" of the Lodge. H 

When do the V.S.L., Square, and Compasses appear in 
the ritual? We learn in our earliest catechism (of 1696) , 



11 



the EdinburghRegister House MS., that the candidate is 
bound to secrecy on the Bible, swearing by "God and St. 
John ( sic ) by the Square and compass and common judge."! 2 
Here, then, may be the first reference to the symbols, 
singly or in combination. The form, "Square, Compasses, 
and Common Judge." is found in all three early texts of the 
Edinburgh group, 13 and it has been convincingly argued 
that the "Common Judge" is in fact that scriptural revela- 
tion of the Grand Geometrician, the V.S.L.14 

The V.S.L. 

You wear the type of Deity; 

Oh I Brother, have a care; 

He whose all-seeing eye surveys 

Your inmost thoughts wide open gaze, 

He knows what thoughts are there! 

Anon. 

Explicit mention of the Bible in the early MS. Constitu- 
tions or Old Charges is uncommon. The earliest of those which pro- 
vide instructions for administering an obligation, the Grand 
Lodge No. 1 MS. of 1583, merely states in Latin: 

"Then one of the elders holds out a book and he or 
they (that are to be sworn) shall place their hands 
upon it and the following precepts shall be read.-*- 5 

The William Watson MS. of a century later (1687) 
similarly stipulates that candidates "must be sworne upon 
a booke," and concludes that the charges shall be "well 
and truely keep to yor power, Soe helpe yu God & Holidome 
& by ye holy contents of this Booke. "16 it is not until 
the Colne No. 1 MS. of 1685 that overt reference to the 
Bible is made, when we are told that, during an oath, "One 
of the eldest taking the Bible shall hould it forth..."! 7 

It is not known with certainty whether these early 
references are to the Constitutions, the Gospels, the Old 
or New Testaments separately, or the entire Bible. No 
part of the Bible was printed in English until 1525, and 
the complete, printed Bible (the Miles Coverdale) appeared 
in English ten years later. 18 Certainly the earliest Bibles 
were exceedingly scarce, possessed only by a few churches 
or very wealthy households, and it hardly seems likely that 
the older operative Lodges would have used them. On the 
other hand, some passages of the Old Charges do imply the 
Bible; 19 an inventory of the Mason's Company of London in 
1665 listed a Bible, Prayer Book, and two copies of the 
Constitutions or Old Charges. 2 ^ 

The available records do not mention Bibles being in 
the possession of Lodges until the first half of the eight- 
eenth century. The oldest extant Scottish minutes — those 
of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel) (commencing 1599), 
and of Lodge Mother Kilwinning, No. (commencing 1642) --and 
English minutes — those of Alnwick (commencing 1701) and 
Swalwell (commencing 1725) --are completely silent on the 
matter. 21 The earliest reference comes from Dumfries 



12 - 



Kilwinning Lodge No. 53 in Scotland, where, we are told: 

"On 20th December 1720 George Dalrymple complimented 
the members with a fine new Bible for their use, which 
was, with the papers Belonging to the Lodge delivered 
in ye box to the Warden. " 22 

In England an inventory of furniture and effects of 
Old Dundee Lodge No. 18, dated December, 1744, lists a 
Bible costing 15s. In Ireland, the first mention occurs 
also in an inventory of 1752 for Cork Lodge, where reference 
is made to "one small, old Bible." 23 

Even well into the eighteenth century, use of the Bible 
was by no means universal. In A letter from the Grand 
Mistress , a published criticism of 1724, sarcastic reference 
is made to the attempt by a group of Irish Masons to form a 
temporary Lodge to initiate a candidate. The attempt was 
foiled because of inability to obtain a copy of the Old 
Testament bound separately from the New, upon which to 
perform the ceremony. 2/ * This may or may not have been 
because the candidate was Jewish. It is interesting that 
today there are still numerous British Lodges which continue 
to employ only the Old Testament as the V.S.L. 2 ^ 

As early as the eighteenth century, a non-Christian 
religious work was employed in one Scottish Lodge to 
obligate Brethren of that persuasion. This was Canongate 
Kilwinning, which kept an annotated copy of the Koran for 
use by Moslems 2 ^. Such a practice was, of course, excep- 
tional during this period, but the movement in this direction 
undoubtedly received impetus when the United Grand Lodge of 
England, after the formation in 1813, deleted Christian 
references in the ritual. In the edition of Preston's 
Illustrations of Masonry published after this date, we find 
the following footnote regarding the V.S.L.: 

"In England, the Bible; but in countries where that 
book is unknown, whatever is understood to contain 
the will or law of God." 2 ^ 

With the spread of the British Empire, the accommoda- 
tion of non-Christian Brethren became inevitable overseas. 
The South African Freemason , in 1886, reported an incident 
in a Burmese Lodge, in which a Buddhist was initiated while 
a Parsee was in the Chair, a Hindu was J.W. , and the J.D. 
was a Moslem. 2 ^ 

Today, if the simple definition in the edition of 
Preston's work referred to above is used, the following 
sacred writings qualify as Volumes of the Sacred Law: 

1. The Pentateuch or Old Testament of the Hebrews 

2. The New Testament of the Christians, though many 
would include or prefer the complete Holy Bible 

3. The Koran of the Moslems 

4. The Zend Avesta of the Parsees or Zoroastrians 

5. The Dhammapada of the Mahayana Buddhists 

6. The Granth of the Sikhs 

7. The Bhagavad Gita of the Hindus 

8. The Tao Te King of the Taoists 



13 



9. The Rig Veda and other Vedas of the Brahmins 
10. The Book of Mormon of the Latter Day Saints. 2 ^ 

In addition, it might be noted that the Bible of the 
Roman Catholics includes the Apocrypha, the deutero-canonical 
books which are interspersed with the others of the Old 
Testament. Regarding the Buddhists, I refer here to the 
Mahayana group of that religion, known as those of the 
Upper or Greater teaching; this group, found in Northern 
India, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan, professes belief in 
a Supreme Being, and also regards the Holy Bible as a sacred 
work. Hinayana Buddhists, those of the Lower or Lesser 
Teaching, do not accept the principle of a Supreme Being. 30 
Customs regarding the precise form or posture of taking an 
obligation vary among the creeds mentioned. 

Employment of these alternate Volumes of the Sacred 
Law is not confined to Lodges composed exclusively of 
Brethren of one faith, as some Masonic writers have sug- 
gested. 31 it is quite acceptable for Brethren of varying 
faiths to attend the same Lodge if the matter is dealt with 
appropriately. The primary criterion appears to be that a 
candidate be obligated upon that V.S.L. which is sacred to 
his faith; at other times the particular faith of the ruling 
Master may be an acceptable solution as to which V.S.L. is 
displayed upon the altar. Some Lodges display all relevant 
versions. In Lodge Singapore, No. 7178 under the English 
Constitution, four different Volumes of the Sacred Law are 
open on the Master's pedestal at any one time. 3 2 

The Square 

You wear the square, but do you have 

That thing the Square denotes? 
Is there within your inmost soul 
That principle which should control 

All deeds, and words, and thoughts? 
The Square of virtue -- is it there, 
Oh! You that wear the Mason's Square? 

Anon. 

What tool do we speak of when we refer to the Square? 
Is it the trying Square of the stonemason, with arms of 
equal length, intended only to test the accuracy of the 
sides of a stone? Or is it what is commonly referred to as 
the "gallows" Square, with sides of unequal length, the 
Square "with its angle four and three"--a tool the sides of 
which conform to the 47th Proposition of Euclid? 

The Baal's Bridge Square, referred to above, has arms 
of equal length. However, this is not a ceremonial tool, 
and, as has been mentioned, its genuineness is suspect in 
the eyes of some scholars. 33 j n one edition of the 1760 
exposure, Three distinct knocks , we find the comment: 

"The Master always sits in the East, or stands with 
the Bible before him; and if it is the Apprentice's 
Lecture, he opens it about the Second Epistle of Peter , 
with the Compasses laid thereon, and the Points of them 



14 



covered with a little Box Square or Lignum Vita, about 
4 inches each Way... "34 

In the MS. catechism, "Dialogue between Simon and 
Philip," circa 1740, there is a drawing of a "new Lodge 
under the Desaguliers regulation" 35 in which the Square is 
represented with equal arms, as is the Square in a plan of 
a Master's Lodge in the Catechisme des Francs Macons of 
1744. 36 

On the other hand, the answer is far from obvious. 
Three distinct knocks , during a representation of the Entered 
Apprentice lecture, also refers to the candidate preparing 
for his obligation by taking "one step upon the first step 
of a right angle oblong square. "37 in a 1737 edition of 
Picart's Religious ceremonies a print appears of a Masonic 
Lodge in which the various Squares represented are the 
gallows type. ° Probably the question will never be 
answered conclusively, due to the lack of uniformity existing 
both in the early speculative period and even in the present 
— the Harris First Degree Tracing Board, in wide use today 
in our own jurisdiction (the final version of which dates 
from 1849), 39 shows both the try and gallows Squares! 

A perusal of the various sources suggests the following 
hypothesis for eighteenth-century Masonry — that the Square 
united with the Compasses on the altar probably had sides 
of equal length, perhaps because of the esthetic, symmet- 
rical appearance produced by this combination, whereas the 
Square within which the candidate was placed to take his 
obligation during the early ceremonies was the oblong, 
gallows type. This would not necessarily apply to all 
Lodges. 

The Square was a conspicuous symbol from the earliest 
speculative period of which we have records. By 1727, 
candidates were being obligated physically within a Square 
laid before them on the floor. 40 Despite its prominence, 
the Square was (as it is today) considered a symbol inferior 
to the Compasses. The former, during the obligation, was 
(and is) placed below the Compasses. After progressing to 
the Second Degree, a candidate was at one time referred to 
as having passed "from the Square to the Compasses," as 
we find in the early minutes of the Scottish Lodge at 
Dunblane: 

"...compeared William Duthie...who was formerly 
Entered prentice and desired to be past, the which 
desire the above Members granted And accordingly he 
is past from the Square to the Compass And from a 
prentice to a fellow of Craft. "41 

This term for passing was generally used in Dunblane 
until 1726, when it was discontinued. By 1730, the corre- 
sponding phrase was "passed according to the usual solem- 
nities. "42 since Dunblane Lodge passed quite early to the 
speculative stage, 4 3 anc j the Third Degree is known to have 
been practiced in 1726 in one Scottish Lodge, 44 we raa y 
speculate that the discontinuation of this term for passing 
was due to the emergence of the Third Degree in some Lodges. 



- 15 



In Masonry dissected , published in 1730, we encounter the 
foregoing phrase reborn: 

"Q. How was you pass'd Master? 
A. From the Square to the Compass." (my italics) 45 

In fact, it is likely that, in the course of the ceremony, 
the candidate advanced physically through "the Lodge" 
drawing chalked or taped on the floor, from an actual or 
chalked Square to an actual or chalked Compass. In the 
Catechisme des Francs-Macons of 1744, we are informed that: 

"The First Warden makes him do the double Square, which 
is done by placing the two heels together, toes 
pointing outward so that they touch the arms of the 
Square, which is drawn in a Master's Lodge. Then he 
shows him the Master's steps which is done by travel- 
ling the distance from the Square to the Compasses; 
in three long equal paces, roughly in triangular form 
...so that his feet again form a double Square, this 
time with the Compasses. "46 

The emergence and steady growth in popularity of the 
Third Degree as a superior or more advanced degree, with 
developing emphasis on the Compasses, may have contributed 
in turn to the identification of the Square with the Second 
Degree, a movement which was completed by 1813, when the 
Square was made a W.T. of the Second Degree only. Preston's 
Second Lecture of circa 1774 clearly emphasized the Square 
as the dominant symbol of the Second Degree. 



47 



If the Compasses are to be construed as a superior 
symbol as suggested, why then is the Master's jewel a Square? 
In the early period, there was no uniformity of practice. 
For example, the print from Picart's Religious ceremonies , 
referred to above, shows the Master wearing a trowel about 
his neck. Masonry dissected explicitly mentions the Square 
as the Master's jewel by 1730. It may be, as one writer has 
proposed, 48 that in the 17th and early 18th centuries the 
office of Master of the Lodge was not a formal office as 
such, and that Lodges were presided over by a senior Brother, 
who may well have only progressed to the Second Degree, or 
whose Lodge only offered the first two degrees. In this 
connection, it is interesting that, at the preliminary 
meetings which led to the formation of the Grand Lodge of 
England, such a practice was followed in placing the oldest 
Master Mason present in the chair. 49 It is also curious 
that officially, until well into the 20th century, the only 
qualifications for the office of Master in an English 
Lodge were that one be a Fellowcraf t and have served as 
Warden. 50 Considering the Square as a Second Degree symbol, 
it is therefore not entirely surprising that it would form 
the Master's jewel. 

In fact, the Square had important connotations of 
mastership. Catechisms of 1724 and 1725 tell us that the 
Lodge is governed "of Square and Rule" or "of Square, Plumb, 
and Rule. "51 More explicitly, other catechisms of the same 
period tell us that "God and the Square are the Master of 
all the Lodges. 52 The Grand mystery laid open (1726) states 



16 



that the founder is "God and the Square. "53 a Mason' s con - 
fession , dated 1727, states that "the Square is acknowledged 
to be master," and elsewhere refers to "the Square, our 
master under God." 5 Preston considered that the Master 
wore the Square: 

"as an emblem of the moral tenets it becomes his duty 
to inculcate, to promote that harmony and ensure the 
happiness among the Brn. which his judicious sway is 
intended to cherish and support. " 55 

In the present-day ritual, we are told that the Compas- 
ses belong to the G.M. in particular and the Square to the 
whole Craft. It is one of the unresolved minor contradic- 
tions of the Craft that, despite this sentiment, the Square 
in fact belongs as a symbol to the Master no less than the 
Compasses to the G.M. ; the main body of Craft Masons are 
merely under the necessity of acting in accordance with the 
principles of moral conduct represented by this symbol. 

The Compasses 

You wear the Compass; do you keep 

Within that circle due, 
That's circumscribed by law divine, 
Excluding hatred, envy, sin, 

Including all that's true? 
The Compass — does it trace that curve 
Inside of which no passions swerve? 

Anon. 

From operative times the Compasses were considered a 
privileged instrument properly belonging to Master Masons. 
The arms of the Mason's Company of London (established in 
the 14th century) depict a Compass as the only Masonic 
symbol or tool.* 6 when Walter Walton, a Master Mason of 
considerable standing, died in 1418, he bequeathed a hewing 
axe and six irons for Masonry to his apprentice; the two 
Compasses in his possession, on the other hand, were left 
to fellow Masters. 57 

In the early speculative period, it is obvious that 
the Compasses were held in esteem from the fact that the 
symbol figured prominently in the ritual oaths of initiates. 
Yet, despite, or because of, this high status, there are no 
references to the Compasses by themselves in the early 
catechisms (except for the metaphorical Yellow Jacket and 
Blue Breeches, which will be considered below) . Other than 
in the obligation, the only references to the Compasses up 
to 1727 are as part of what we would now call the Great 
Lights in two instances — the Dumfries No. 4 MS. (as pillars 
of the Lodge) 5 ^ and A Mason's examination (as part of a just 
and perfect Lodge ). 5 Even after this time, references to 
the Compasses independently are exceedingly rare--there is 
but one solitary and passing reference in each of the 
Wilkinson MS. and Masonry dissected , ^0 and neither contains 
any but the most cursory moralizing. 

It seems that, despite the primacy of this symbol from 
the beginning, the mystic or moral expression of the 



17 



significance of the Compasses developed with exceeding 
slowness, not receiving attention until well into the 
second half of the eighteenth century. This situation is 
confirmed to an extent by an examination of Lodge inventor- 
ies — in Scotland, at least, the Compasses are mentioned on 
only three occasions, in inventories of 1730, 1739 and 
17 59.^1 The paucity of inventory references to the 
Compasses might also perhaps be interpreted as indirect 
confirmation of the slow growth of the Third Degree in 
popularity. 

Though the Square was entirely appropriate as a Master's 
jewel, there were indications that the Compasses at one time 
were becoming increasingly identified with this office. A 
very early note is found in the Dumfries No. 4 MS. , circa 
1710, which states: 

"Q. Would you know your master if you saw him? 

A. Yes. 

Q. What way would ye know him? 

A. By his habit. 

Q. What couller is his habit? 

A. Yellow & blew meaning the compass w c is brass & 
iron. "62 

The reference to a yellow jacket, meaning the brass Compasses, 
and blue breeches, meaning the steel points, is repeated in 
four other catechisms from 1727 to 1730.63 

There almost certainly was a movement towards the adop- 
tion of the Compasses as a Master's jewel (at least in 
Master's Lodges) as the Third Degree grew in prominence. 
In Masonry dissected , the following exchange appears: 

"Q. What is the other Furniture of a Lodge? 
A. Bible, Compass and Square. 
Q. Who do they belong to? 

A. Bible to God, Compass to the Master, and Square 
to the Fellowcraft. "64 

In 1735 the minutes of the Master's Lodge of the Old 
King's Arms record a motion for the purchase of "a Jewel 
for the use of the Master at the passing of Masters; "65 
this note may signify that the Square was thought inappro- 
priate for this degree. 

The Compasses, nevertheless, came to be worn by the 
Grand Master of the Moderns. According to Preston, this was 
because: 

"They are the chief instrument used in the formation 
of every curious design and therefore worn by him as 
an emblem of dignity and excellence, as from him 
alone can genuine designs in true Masonry proceed, 
and under his auspices only can any valuable work be 
done. "66 

With the need to provide a symbol befitting the exalted 
dignity of this office, the use of the Compasses by Masters 
of Lodges was thereafter effectively blocked (although it 



18 



was only with the publication of the 1815 Book of Constitu- 
tion that the Grand Master's jewel was described in detail). 
67 Paradoxically, the Deacons of Lodges of the Antients also 
wore Compasses, a practice which one writer considers to 
have been a deliberate taunt at the Moderns' Grand Master. 68 



SYMBOLIC INTERPRETATION 



General 



As explained previously, the attribution of symbolic 
meaning to the Great Lights is a phenomenon of the specula- 
tive period of Masonry. Yet the origin of the importance 
of these three symbols can be traced to the operative days 
of the Craft. From the Old Charges, it would appear that 
operative Masonry was, firstly, a moral code, and, secondly, 
a society with operative secrets. 69 as for the first 
element, a moral code, the relevance of the Sacred Law to 
a moral system based upon Christian principles is obvious. 
From the second element is derived the particular signifi- 
cance of the Square and Compasses. Though we have no certain 
knowledge of the actual trade secrets, despite much specula- 
tion, there is no doubt that they existed and involved 
advanced working tools. The Melrose MS. No. 2 of 1674 
(considered a copy of Melrose MS. No. 1, 1581) enjoins that 
no "frie mason" employing "Loses" (cowans) ought to let 
such persons know "ye privilege of ye compass, square, levell, 
and ye plum-rule. " 7u 

The V.S.L. is the foremost of the Great Lights; indeed, 
the Grand Lodges of England, Ireland and Scotland officially 
declared it to be so in 1929.^1 it is accepted in all 
denominational forms which meet the criteria of belief in a 
Supreme Being, revelation of God's will, and immortality of 
the soul. In the words of one writer, "For us it is an open 
Book, with only one Word written thereon, and that word is 
'God'." 72 This symbol is the spiritual tracing board of 
the Great Architect, open when the Lodge is opened, and 
closed when the Lodge is closed. No business is legal, and 
no initiation valid without its presence, and its symbolic 
influence pervades our Masonic ceremonies throughout. 7 ^ 

The V.S.L. is distinguished from the other Great Lights 
in two ways. It is unique in its divine origin, being 
derived from God to man in general. Secondly, although of 
particular relevance to the Entered Apprentice, its signifi- 
cance extends to every degree, changing only in relation to 
the supposed progress of the candidate in ability to inter- 
pret and comprehend the Divine Law. 

The symbolic meaning of each of the Great Lights can 
best be understood in the context of the Light metaphor, 
the Temple allegory, and the concept of progression of 
knowledge in Masonry. 

Light 

In its symbolic sense, Light may be construed Masonic- 
ally as true knowledge or wisdom, emanating ultimately from 



19 



God. As such, it is necessarily good in itself, and the 
polar opposite of darkness and evil. During the eighteenth 
century, candidates for initiation were commonly obligated 
on a Bible opened at the first Chapter of the Gospel accord- 
ing to St. John, where the following passage is found: 

"In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with 
God, and the Word was God. ...In him was life, and 
the life was the light of men. And the light shineth 
in darkness, and the darkness comprehended it not. 
...That was the true Light, which lighteth every man 
that cometh into the world." 

Today, immediately following his obligation, the atten- 
tion of the newly-initiated candidate is directed to the 
Great though emblematic Lights. For him, as we shall see 
below, the V.S.L. is of primary relevance, the other symbols 
assuming significance in time. It is obvious that the V.S.L. 
is a direct source of enlightenment. But what of the Square 
and Compasses? How can these mute, material objects 
dispense "Light"? 

Clearly these tools are "Lights" because of the power- 
ful associations which we each develop for them; by further 
contemplation of the moral concepts which they embody, a 
Brother is stimulated towards an improved state of mind and 
behaviour. According to William Preston: 

"In the illustration of our ceremonies the duties of 
morality are zealously enforced, & in the explanation 
of our hieroglyphical emblems, the power of virtue 
is faithfuly displayed. " 7 4 

Our ritual informs us that every character, figure, and 
emblem has a moral tendency, and serves to inculcate the 
practice of virtue in all its genuine professors. 

Yet such associations with these tools must be grounded 
in a particular, fundamental, and receptive outlook. There 
must be an initial predisposition of the candidate towards 
the appropriate moral viewpoint, he being first prepared 
in his own heart, and then exposed to the inspiration and 
guidance of the scriptures. Thus the ladder of our personal 
advancement rests upon the V.S.L. Exposure to the Light 
of the Sacred Law is the essential first step required 
eventually to render comprehensible the other Great Lights. 

The Temple Allegory 

"What is Masonry?" the equestion is asked in Preston's 
Second Lecture. The answer, we learn, is that, "Masonry 
is a peculiar system of science explained under the allegory 
of a building and communicated by symbols." 7 ^ 

In the Dumfries No. 4 MS. of 1710, the Bible, Square, 
and "Compass" are referred to as the three "pillars" of the 
Lodge, 76 and, in the 1727 Wilkinson MS., the term "furniture 1 
of the Lodge appears for the first time. 77 Both allusions 
are rendered intelligible by reference to the Temple 
allegory, an early development of speculative Masonry. A 



20 



characteristic of the Moderns' Grand Lodge, the use of the 
term "furniture" for these symbols has persisted. 

We learn in the First Degree lecture that the universe 
is the Temple of the Deity whom we serve. Secondly, and 
more significantly for our purpose, the Temple is seen as 
the Masonic fraternity or Lodge, patterned after and per- 
petuating the achievement of K.S. Preston considered this 
Temple to be, in the context of his legend, a place for 
worship, a repository for all maxims of morality and govern- 
ment, and "a place of study for all physical sciences then 
understood and taught. " 7 ^ 

Thirdly, the Temple may be seen as the personal, 
spiritual structure built by a Mason in his progress towards 
the attainment of virtue and enlightenment. In the margin 
of Emanuel Zimmermann's eighteenth century copy of J & B , 
the following note may be seen: 

"What do Free-masons busy themselves with in Lodges? 
In building prisons for vices and temples for virtues. 
That is to say, the Temple of Solomon being a Terrest- 
(r)ial temple was soon destoyed by the hands of men or 
times, but we are occupied in Building a Spiritual 
Temple which is to last for ever and ever, hoping that 
you will prove yourself a faithfull B. among us, to 
the end you may be rewarded in the Celestial Temple. "79 
(spelling as in original text) 

In the Charity Lecture, the initiate is informed that 
he, being newly admitted into Masonry, is placed at the N.E. 
angle of the Lodge figuratively to represent the foundation 
stone, and hope is expressed that, from the foundation laid 
that evening, he may raise a superstructure perfect in its 
parts and honourable to the Builder. Later it is explained 
that his Masonic goal is to progress towards a degree of 
spiritual attainment which is the summit of Masonry, figur- 
atively speaking, an etherial mansion veiled from mortal 
eyes. 

From the foregoing, the prominent position of the 
symbols in the Temple is apparent. Once within this spirit- 
ual edifice, the Brother is expected to occupy himself with 
the use and contemplation of the furniture, those sacred 
artifacts within, that he may realize his spiritual potential 
and the hope of partaking in the blessed promises therein 
contained. 

Progression of Knowledge 

It is by considering the unfolding of a Mason's enlight- 
enment that the individual significance of the Great Lights 
may best be understood. The Temple allegory alludes to this 
progression by relating the First to Third Degrees to the 
outer, middle, and inner chambers, respectively. The W.T. 
of the various degrees also reflect this phased process. In 
the Frist Degree, the tools are menial in nature, for 
hammering, measuring, and smoothing; in the Second, they 
are precision tools of trying and proving; and those of the 
Third are not those of a workman at all, but of an architect, 



21 



a Master, used for delineation and rendering the circle 
complete. 80 The symbol of Jacob's Ladder portrays a 
spiritual advance, through the virtues of Faith, Hope and 
Charity, to the summit of Masonry. 

"Our Lodges stand on holy ground," the newly-initiated 
brother is told. The V.S.L. will be the foundation of his 
progress and a source of moral knowledge which can be of 
immediate benefit without prolonged apprenticeship. The 
knowledge to be gained, however, is limited to conformity 
with basic moral tenets, while comprehension of the under- 
lying principles must await further advancement. 

Obedience to the moral code is the primary requisite 
to the study of the liberal arts and sciences which is to 
follow. In Preston's Second Lecture, we find this question 
and answer: 

"Q. Why morality before science? 
A. Because the important secrets of nature and dis- 
coveries of wise men must only be taught and 
imparted unto men whose moral conduct may vouch 

for their not abusing of their knowledge for improper 



purposes. 



-.81 



Further on, he explains that the knowledge to be imparted 
at future stages will in turn elucidate this moral code: 

"It is he said ... necessary to be acquainted with the 
laws of nature to be able to point out the laws of 
morality. Hence the E.A. is only taught the moral law 
which every man ought to know; the F.C. then learns the 
reasons of it, as pointed out by nature and revealed 
to all men who wish to make a proper use of their 
mental faulties."82 

The Square teaches us to regulate our lives and actions 
by the Masonic rule and line, and to correct and harmonize 
our conduct by the principles of morality and virtue. The 
object of the Second Degree is not only knowledge of the 
arts and sciences, but self- improvement by bringing rude 
matter into due form. The second of the Great Lights is 
symbolic of the intermediate stage of enlightenment, of 
finishing the task of improving our outward behaviour by 
squaring our conduct and curbing excesses. One manifesta- 
tion of this is a new spirit of brotherhood, as Emanuel 
Zimmermann noted: 

"The squar is represented to us as the golden Rull of 
the Gospel that shows us out (= how) to rule our 
actions..." 83 (Spelling as in original text.) 

The attainment of sufficient virtue will in turn entitle 
a Brother to progress towards the last and greatest trial. 
According to Preston's version of the legend, the Middle 
Chamber was guarded by a Fellowcraft, whose duty was to 
demand proof of merit and provide instruction as to how to 
advance towards Mastership: 



22 - 



"Q. What did he demand? 

A. The additional proofs established by Solomon as 
the criterion of moral rectitude and the ground- 
work of all claim to preferment, for talents 
however eminent when not supported by virtue are 
more dangerous than beneficial to society. 

Q. What is the test? 

A. It is symbolically represented by the square." 

The compasses represent the final stage of enlightenment, 
the drawing of boundaries between good and evil, not through 
mere blind adherence to the moral law, but by a thorough 
intellectual comprehension of the basis and implications of 
the Divine system. This knowledge is not wholly derivable 
from the reference to our world of sensible phenomena; it 
is inspired or revealed through the grace of the Great 
Architect. "Man by the light of mind" says Preston's Third 
Lecture: 

"can penetrate beyond infinity and can discover what no 
sensible experience can bring to his knowledge. It 
proves to his firm conviction that besides his material 
faculties of perception and imagination, which proceed 
from the organs of the body, there is in Man a power 
indepedent of these, separate from matter and by no 
means deriving its origin in the body, whence he is 
enabled to judge, to reason and determine. " 85 

The compasses signify a reaching beyond the confines 
of mortality to an intuition of eternity. Here again we 
encounter the Light symbol. The Light of a Master Mason's 
Lodge is darkness visible — namely, understanding beyond the 
reach of reason through Divine guidance. The Third Degree 
entails the piercing of that mysterious veil which the eye 
of human reason cannot penetrate unless assisted by the 
light which is from above. 

Through this expanded awareness, the Brother is enabled 
to understand morality in its final aspect, by incorporating 
into his moral viewpoint the prospect of immortality beyond 
the confines of this sublunary abode. Hence he is at last 
enabled with accuracy and precision to delineate, by viture 
of his own understanding under the All-Seeing Eye, the limits 
of good and evil, and to keep morally within due bounds with 
all mankind. 

What brings about this piercing of the veil, this new 
comprehension? The compasses rotate about a centre point, 
and here we have the final and greatest "secret" of Masonry 
(which has nevertheless been understood by mankind's great- 
est philosophers since the beginning of civilization) — it 
is the transformation which occurs within. "What is a 
perfect Lodge?" ask the Graham and Essex manuscripts? The 
answer is "The centre of a true heart?" 86 i n the margin of 
Emanuel Zimmermann's copy of J & B we find a reference (an 
echo of earlier catechisms) to, "Ye Senter of ye heart where 
ye Sec(ret) of massonery leas (lies) . " 87 (Spelling as in 
original text) . 



- 23 



It is this central point, the most vital part of man, 
from which a M.M. cannot err, which enables him unfailingly 
to draw the boundaries or due bounds between good and evil 
with all mankind. If he has true virtue in his own heart, 
a M.M. will correctly encompass goodness in the world about 
him. As the French exposure of 1738, La reception myster - 
ieuse , states: 

"The point or the central point prevents the Master 
making any mistakes in drawing the circumference."^ 

The "Centre of the Universe, the Divine Architect" is the 
term used by Preston in one lecture. ^9 Perhaps it is not 
too much to say that our centre, the "true heart," is, 
from another vantage point, the small divine flame which 
flickers in each one of us. 

Masonry has made its own distinctive contribution to 
man's ideas about his relationship with his fellow creatures 
and the Great Architect above. Some of the best of these 
thoughts are symbolized in our Great Lights. It should not 
surprise us greatly if the path we tread has also been 
sought by others from time immemorial. One of the greatest 
of these, Plato, provided a strangely familiar echo of our 
subject, when he employed the symbol of Light, and wrote of 
man's progress towards true knowledge of the Good. The 
passage about man's advancement expresses the general 
meaning of the Great Lights very well: 

"At first he would most easily discern the shadows, and, 
after that, the likenesses or reflections in water of 
men and other things, and later, the things themselves, 
and from these he would go on to contemplate the 
appearances in the heavens and heaven itself, more 
easily by night, looking at the light of the stars 
and moon, then by day the sun and the sun's light... and 
so, finally. . . , he would be able to look upon the sun 
itself and see its true nature, not by reflections in 
water or phantasms of it in an alien setting, but in 
and by itself in its own place." 



The Republic . Book VII 



At the conclusion of his presentation, Brother Tim 
Barnes was given an upstanding and resounding hand of 
applause. R.W.Bro. Bruce then called on the Reviewers for 
their comments. 

The following notes and references were given by Bro. 
Barnes as an appendix to his paper for those Masons desirous 
of further research in the subject. 

Abbreviations: A.Q.C. — Ars Quatuor Coronatorum 

E.M.C. — Douglas Knoop, G.P. Jones and 
Douglas Hamer, eds. , The Early Masonic 
Catechisms . 2nd ed. London: Quatuor 
Coronati Lodge, 1963. 



- 24 - 

G. Peter Daynes, "The Bible — its place and use in 
Lodges," A.Q.C., 67: p. 73, 1955. This policy has been 
restated repeatedly in various jurisdictions; for example, 
by the Grand Lodge Swiss Alpina in 1965, when the Grand 
Master stated that, "there were limits to tolerance." 
(Alpina, No. 3, March 1965). 

2 
W.H. Rylands, "Notes on some Masonic symbols, "A.Q.C., 

8: pp 85-88, 1895. Also see the comment by E.W. Cox, p. 

106 and illustrations opposite. 

Robert Freke Gould, and W. James Hughan, A library of 
Freemasonry: derived from official sources throughout the 
world, comprising its history, antiquities, symbols, consti - 
tutions, customs, and concordant orders, with other import - 
ant information from the earliest period to the present time 
(London, 1911), opp. p. 268. 

4 
Douglas Knoop, and G.P. Jones, The genesis of Free - 
masonry: an account of the rise and development of Free - 
masonry in its operative, accepted, and early speculative 
phases (London, 1978), p. 8. 

Eric Ward, "The Baal's Bridge square," A.Q.C., 82: 
p. 255-257, 1969, with reply by Norman Knight, Ibid . , p. 257. 

The Edinburgh Register House MS. (1696) , Chetwode 
Crawley MS. (c. 1700) , Kevan MS. (c. 1714-20) , Dumfries MS. 
(c. 1710) and A Masons examination (1723). 

The grand mystery of Free-Masons discover 'd (1724) , 
and the Institution of Free Masons MS. (c. 1725). 

o 

The whole institution of Masonry MS. (1724) , The 
whole institutions of Free-Masons opened (1725) , and the 
Graham MS. (1726) . 

Q 

Anonymous, The three distinct knocks at the door of 
the most ancient Freemasonry (London, n.d.), p. 10. 

William Preston, "The first lecture of Free Masonry," 
P.R. James, ed. , A.Q.C., 82: p. 127, 1969. 

i:L Ibid., p. 137 

12 E.M.C. , p. 33. 

The Edinburgh Register House MS., Chetwode Crawley MS. , 
and Kevan MS. 

14 

F.J. Underwood, "The common judge," A.Q.C., 54: 111-114, 

1961. As for the theory that the Common Judge was a, "gauge 
or templet" (E.M.C. , p. 241), Underwood argues with devastat- 



25 - 



ing effect that the very essence of a template is that it 
is custom-made for each job; therefore, by definition, the 
notion of a "common template" is contradictory. His further 
analysis is in the best tradition of historical detective 
work. 



51 



Harry Carr, The Freemason at work (London, 1977) , p, 



G. Peter Daynes, op.cit . , p. 74. 

17 ibid. 

18 

Harry Carr, op.cit . ,p. 51. 

19 

G. Peter Daynes, op.cit . , p. 77. 

20 

A.J.B. Milbourne, comment on paper by G. Peter 

Daynes, op. cit . , p. 81. 

Harry Carr, op. cit . , p. 52. 

22 

C. Marshall Rose, "The Scottish lodge: its inventor- 
ies, furniture, and regalia," A.Q.C., 64: p 98, 1953. 

23 

C. Marshall Rose, comment on paper by G. Peter Daynes, 

op.cit . , p. 80. 

24 E.M.C, p. 231. 

25 

G.S. Draffen, comment on paper by G. Peter Daynes, 

op.cit . , p. 80. 

2 6 

C. Marshall Rose, "The Scottish lodge," op.cit . , p. 99. 

27 

Colin Dyer, Symbolism in Craft Masonry (Shepperton, 

Middlesex, 1976), p. 115. 

28 A.Q.C, 1: p. 191, 1886-1888. 

29 

Henry Wilson Coil, Coil's Masonic encyclopedia (New 

York, 1961), p. 674, and N.B. Cryer, "The Volume of the 

Sacred Law — its forms and usage in Freemasonry," A.Q.C., 

90: pp. 88 ff . , 1977. 

30 N.B. Cryer, op.cit . , pp. 88 ff. 

for example, Albert G. Mackey, An encyclopedia of 
Freemasonry and its kindred sciences; comprising the whole 
range of arts, sciences, and literature as connected with 
the institution (Philadelphia, 1906), p. 114. 



- 26 - 

32 

Harry Carr, op.cit . , p. 339. 

3 Eric Ward, op.cit . , pp. 255-257. 

34 

quoted by Harry Carr, op.cit . , pp. 312-313. This 

passage does not appear in the edition consulted by me. 

35 E.M.C. , p. 181. 

Harry Carr, ed., The early French exposures (London, 
1971) , p. 99. 

37 

Anonymous, The three distinct knocks , op.cit . , p. 9. 

38 

reproduced in Sydney T. Klein, "Magister-mathesios , " 

A.Q.C., 23: opp. p. 126, 1910. 

39 

G.E.W. Bridge, "Veiled in allegory and illustrated 

by symbols," in Harry Carr, ed. , The collected Prestonian 

lectures , 1925-1960 (London, 1967), p. 267. 

40 see the Wilkinson MS., 1727 (E.M.C., p. 125), and 
Masonry dissected , ( op. cit . , p. 161) . The mystery of Free - 
Masonry , 1730, states that, "A Square was laid on the Ground, 
in which they made me kneel..." cf. The confession of John 
Coustos to the Portuguese Inquisition, where it is recorded 
that, "...This being done he is told to uncover the right 
knee and place it upon a mason's square..." (A.Q.C., 66: 
p. 112, 1954); presumably "within a square" was intended. 

41 

A.F. Hatten, "The early minute book of the Lodge of 

Dunblane," A.Q.C., 67: p. 90, 1955. 

42 

Ibid . , p. 97. 

43 Ibid . , p. 118. 

44 

Lodge Dunbarton Kilwinning (No. 18, S.C.). Harry 

Carr, The Freemason at work , op.cit . . p. 61. 

45 E.M.C, p. 168. 

46 

Harry Carr, ed. , The early French exposures , op.cit . , 

p. 102. 

47 

William Preston, "The second lecture of Free Masonry," 

P.R. James, ed. , A.Q.C., 83: pp. 193-247, 1970. 

48 

Lionel Vibert, "The second degree: a theory," 

A.Q.C., 39: p. 209, 1926. 

49 

Albert G. Mackey, op.cit . , p. 32 0. 



- 27 



Lionel Vibert, op.cit . , p. 216. 

The grand mystery of Free-masons discover 'd , 1724 
(E.M.C., p. 78), and the Institution of Free Masons MS., 
c. 1725 (E.M.C., p. 84). 

52 The whole institution of Masonry MS., 1724 (E.M.C., 
p. 81) , and The whole institutions of Free Masons opened , 
1725 (E.M.C. , p. 87) . 

53 E.M.C, p. 97. 

54 Ibid. , pp. 102-103. 

William Preston, "The first lecture," op.cit . , p. 139 

Harry Carr, The Freemason at work, op.cit . , p. 115. 

Douglas Knoop, and G.P. Jones, The mediaeval mason : 
an economic history of English stone building m the later 
Middle Ages and early modern times (Manchester, 1967), 
p. 59 and p. 148n. 

58 E.M.C, p. 62. 

59 

E.M.C, p. 73. Once again I am equating the common 

judge with the V.S.L. See n. 14, above. 

60 E.M.C, p. 138 and p. 168. 

C. Marshall Rose, "The Scottish Lodge," op.cit . , p. 
102. 

62 E.M.C, p. 63. 

A Mason's confession , 1727, the Wilkinson MS., c. 
1727, The mystery of Free Masonry , 1730, and Masonry 
dissected , 1730. 

64 

A Mason's confession , c. 1727 (E.M.C, p. 103), 

Wilkinson M.S., c. 1727 (E.M.C, p. 134), The mystery of 

Free-Masonry , 1730 (E.M.C, p. 1), and Masonry dissected , 

1730 (E.M.C. , p. 164) . 

Gilbert W. Daynes, comment on paper by Arthur Heiron, 
"Masters' lodges," A.Q.C, 39: p. 159, 1926. 

William Preston, "The second lecture," op. cit . , p. 
137n. 

Harry Carr, The Freemason at work, op.cit . , p. 4. 



- 28 - 

6 8 

A.C.F. Jackson. "The English exposures of 1760/62," 

A.Q.C., 84: p. 175, 1971. 

E.L. Hawkins, "The evolution of Masonic ritual," 
A.Q.C., 26: pp. 6-21, 1913. 

M. Lyon, "History of Mother Kilwinning," Freemason' s 
Magazine , N.S. 9: p. 416, 1863. 

G. Peter Daynes, "The Bible," op.cit . , p. 73. 

72 

Joseph Inglis, "Some aspects of Masonic symbolism," 

A.Q.C., 83: p. 360, 1970. 

Joseph Johnson, "The inwardness of Masonic symbolism 
in the three degrees," In: The collected Prestonian lec- 
tures , op.cit . , p. 233. 

74 

William Preston, "The second lecture," op.cit . , p. 220 

William Preston, "the third lecture of Freemasonry," 
P.R. James, ed. , A.Q.C., 85: p. 112, 1972. 

76 E.M.C. , p. 62. 

77 E.M.C. , p. 132. 

7 8 

William Preston, "The second lecture," op.cit . , p. 225 

79 

Paul Tunbridge, "Emanuel Zimmermann: a founder of 

Rose Croix in Ireland," A.Q.C., 79: p. 107, 1966. 

8 

Richard Tydeman, "Masters and master masons; a theory 

of the third degree." A.Q.C., 84: p. 192, 1971. 

81 

William Preston, "The second lecture," op.cit . , p. 226 

Ibid . 

8 3 

Paul Tunbridge, op.cit . , p. 114. 

84 

William Preston, "The second lecture," op.cit . , p. 222, 

8 5 

William Preston, "The third lecture," op.cit . , p. 211. 

86 E.M.C, p. 90 and p. 183. 

87 

Paul Tunbridge, op.cit . , p. 109. 



- 29 - 



Harry Carr, ed., The early French exposures, op.cit . , 
24. 

8 9 

William Preston, "The first lecture," op.cit. , p. 141 



REVIEWS 

1. By R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen, P.D.D.G.M., Chatham District and 
a Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge. 

I congratulate Bro. T.H. Barnes on an extremely well- 
written article on "The Great Lights of Masonry". He has 
set out in a clear manner and in ONE sentence in his intro- 
duction: "The Great Lights are the dominant, most powerful 
symbols of Craft Masonry" . He then proceeds to carefully 
lead us through an exhaustive discussion of the historical 
view of the subject. He presents in the bibliography just 
where his facts are found. In the second section Bro. 
Barnes gives an insight into the symbolic interpretation 
he believes to be applicable in light of the source material 
to which he has access. 

One statement, however, in the part entitled "Symbolic 
Interpretation" creates a question. The statement is as 
follows: "As for the first element, a moral code, the 
relevance of the Sacred Law to a moral system based upon 
Christian principles is obvious" . Would not the same apply 
to the Mosaic Law? I have some doubts that this statement 
is entirely true. 

We are grateful that Bro. Barnes has taken the time to 
do the research necessary for this article and to write such 
an interesting discussion on the subject. We hope this will 
encourage others to pick up the challenge and do likewise. 

R.W.Bro. Edsel G. Steen. 



2. By R.W. Bro. James Gerrard, P.D.D.G.M., Toronto District 
No. 1, and a Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge; read by 
R.W.Bro. David Bradley. 

When the Brethrenon The Heritage Lodge have the oppor- 
tunity to read and study, at their leisure, the paper "The 
Great Lights of Masonry: An Historical and Symbolic Inter- 
pretation" all will join in offering our congratulations 
to Bro. Barnes for his most enjoyable, thought provoking 
and well documented paper. We have received the benfit of 
his extensive research and study in this presentation. The 
89 references submitted give us some idea of the depth of 
his research and study. 

In the introduction it is stated' "From the historical 
viewpoint, the evolution of these emblems in the Craft 
ritual, collectively and individually, will be considered." 
The reviewer interpreted this to mean - "the evolution of 
the lessons of morality taught by the use of these emblems". 
Bro. Barnes has kept to his stated intent to view the Great 



- 30 



Lights from within the Craft. He has brought to our atten- 
tion the wide variations put on the use and explanations 
of the Great Lights. 

The V.S.L. can be one of many books that express the 
will of the Divine Creator. Today in the lodges in Israel 
for instance, it is common to have three V.S.L. 's on the 
Altar. They are the Koran, the Pentateuch and the Bible. 
The Bible in most cases being that used by the Eastern 
Orthodox and printed in Greek. The reviewer believes that 
when Dr. Anderson in his early Constitution declared, "Let 
a man's religion, or mode of worship, be what it may, he 
is not excluded from the Order, provided he believes in 
the Architect of heaven and earth, and practices the sacred 
duties of morality." He opened the Craft to all good men 
throughout the world. 

One gathers that as speculative Freemasonry once 
received direction from a central point the variations 
began to meld into what we have today in our ritual. 

We have had brought to our minds the great debt we 
owe to our Brethren of yesteryear who began to use the 
square and compasses as tools to teach the lessons of 
morality and virtue. Should Bro. Barnes have gone outside 
the Craft he would have brought to our attention that 
which we owe to the men who developed such things as the 
movable type for printing which brought books to the general 
public and of course the V.S.L. to its central place in 
Freemasonry. 

The reviewer strongly believes that the great strength 
of Masonry and one of its great blessings is that each 
Brother Mason can study the lessons taught by our ritual 
and put his own interpretation on them. Who is to say 
which might be the better. Each will add something to the 
whole and although they will vary they are only variations 
within conformity. We receive from the section - Symbolic 
Interpretation - of this paper the interpretations of Bro. 
Barnes. He has added another facit by which we can view 
the jewel we call Freemasonry. With permission we could 
use this section for short talks in our lodges. 

In conclusion of this review the reviewer hopes that 
we will again hear from Bro. Barnes in the not too distant 
future. 

R.W.Bro. James W. Gerrard. 



3. By W.Bro. Reg Medhurst, P.M., Long Branch Lodge No. 
632 and a Member of The Heritage Lodge. 

Bro. Barnes has given us a paper on a topic which is 
always timely and open to new thought. He has presented in 
a systematic way much material which will prove useful to 
our Lodges. The material shows evidence of considerable 
research and organization. He has referred to many works, 
all of which are entirely appropriate to his presentation. 



- 31 



However, he seems to have two lectures here - the 
historical and the symbolic interpretation of the Lights, 
and the historical parts seem to be recitations of histori- 
cal facts, most of which are unrelated to the interpreta- 
tion. I would have preferred to see interpretation backed 
up by fewer historical facts. One must remember that 
historical facts are much better absorbed by reading and 
contemplation than by the oral presentation. 

Bro. Barnes, in his historical interpretation has 
raised a number of questions which should provoke further 
thought, and this is, I feel, what any lecture should do. 
The contexts he uses for his symbolic interpretation are 
excellent choices and throw light on the subject. One must, 
however, bear in mind that two of the three Great Lights 
are working tools in other degrees, and a study of their 
uses there will add further light. I must confess that I 
found the final quotation from Plato provided a rather 
abrupt ending to what had been an interesting lecture. 

This has been a paper worthy of our attention and 
commendation, and has upheld the fine tradition established 
by the Heritage Lodge. 

W.Bro. A. Reg. Medhurst. 



As time was late, there was no opportunity for informal 
discussion and R. W.Bro. Bruce called on Bro. Barnes to 
respond to the Reviewers. 



SUMMARY BY BRO. T. H. BARNES 

I would like to thank the reviewers for their attention 
and critiques. In so doing, I admit to feeling some relief 
that they may possibly have felt inclined to be sparing of 
a Brother on his maiden excursion into the turbulent seas 
of Masonic scholarship. One criticism to which I would 
confess would be a remark on the presence here and there 
of quotations of primary material indirectly obtained through 
secondary sources. This was done reluctantly, and was 
occasioned by necessity. Despite assistance, it was impos- 
sible to locate certain important works, such as J & B 
for example, in time. 

It also might have been fair to take me to task for 
what I realized after submission could appear to be a contra- 
diction — namely, my claim that the Compasses are the superior 
Great Lights symbol, followed later in the paper by 
reference to the V.S.L. as "the foremost of the Great 
Lights." What was meant was that the V.S.L. is foremost 
intrinsically--it is the physical evidence of the Great 
Architect, and its influence pervades our ceremonies; 
nevertheless, it is identified with the initiatory stage. 
The Compasses are superior in terms of symbolizing the 
final stage of enlightenment, the last step of a Brother's 
progress. 



32 - 



Right Worshipful Bro. Steen has queried the statement, 
"As for the first element, a moral code, the relevance of 
the Sacred Law to a moral system based upon Christian 
principles is obvious." This remark was merely an elabora- 
tion of the claim that the importance of the Great Lights 
was evident in the operative period of stonemasonry, 
though not as symbols. I had restated E.L. Hawkins 1 
description of the Craft prior to the advent of speculative 
Masonry, that it was a society with operative trade secrets 
in combination with a moral code (A.Q.C., 26: pp. 6-21, 1913) 
And it was in this context that I then proceeded to explain 
the importance of the. V.S.L., the Square and Compasses to 
operative Masons. Since operative Masonry was devoutly 
Christian and embraced a distinct moral code, the V.S.L. 
(in this period the Holy Bible) was necessarily, by defini- 
tion, prominent. In this early Christian era of British 
operative stonemasonry, however, the Mosaic Law was not a 
factor to my knowledge. 

Right Worshipful Bro. Gerrard's comment about the 
practice of Israeli Lodges in the use of several versions 
of the V.S.L. is interesting. The Grand Lodges of India 
and Iran may similarly be added to the list of jurisdictions 
where this is commonplace. I am not sure that I quite 
understand Bro. Gerrard's remark about my having confined 
my research to "within the Craft," however. I trust that 
he intended this as a compliment that I did not become 
sidetracked by tangential issues unrelated to the subject. 
The Brother further adds that: 

"...The great strength of Masonry and one of its great 
blessings is that each Brother Mason can study the 
lessons taught by our ritual and put his own interpre- 
tation on them. Who is to say which might be the 
better? Each will add something to the whole and 
although they will vary they are only variations within 
conformity. " 

That is a worthy sentiment, but it may not always be 
appropriate or desirable. I will touch on this point again 
in connection with my reply to the next critique. 

All things considered, I felt fairly pleased with myself 
until I ready Worshipful Bro. Medhurst's critique, including 
the comment that he found the final quotation from Plato a 
rather abrupt ending. In my experience, one of the greatest 
challenges in dealing with subjects of this type is simply 
that of articulating the complex abstract concepts, plus 
organizing and presenting them effectively. Yes, I concede 
that a touch more polish and yet one more final draft would 
perhaps have enabled me to fine-tune the flow of argument 
and restructure the paper a mite more impressively. Still, 
I do not apologize for quoting Plato. The fact that certain 
of our philosophical concepts correspond closely (and not 
by chance or imitation) with what may be perhaps the most 
renowned allegory in the history of human thought does 
honour to our Order. Too often we think of our symbolism, 
our ethical system, in practical terms of effect on the 
individual rather than as a philosophy manifesting intellec- 
tual elegance. It was my intention to underscore the point 



33 



that, even if it is not always described unambiguously in a 
systematic manner, our moral philosophy has the potential 
to compare with the product of other respected schools of 
thought. 

The Worshipful Brother has also observed that historical 
facts are much better absorbed by reading and contemplation 
than by oral presentation. Nevertheless, the same claim 
can be made in equal measure with respect to symbolic inter- 
pretation, so I'm afraid I'm caught, as the saying goes, 
between a rock and a hard place on that charge. 

Worshipful Brother Medhurst further states that: 

"...The historical parts seem to be recitations of 
historical facts, most of which are unrelated to the 
interpretation. I would have preferred to see inter- 
pretation backed up by fewer historical facts." 

Like the reviewer, I find the challenge of symbolic inter- 
pretation and philosophy to offer the most stimulation of 
all. But before one may enjoy the desert, one should first 
deal with the meat and potatoes, and the bread and butter. 
Our ritual is not sufficient as a basis for speculation-- 
however, wondrous an achievement it may be, almost every 
passage requires additional explanation. Thus, reference 
to the evolution of the ritual, as well as past and present 
practices, is necessary. 

Two approaches are therefore possible: 

1. To develop a symbolic interpretation of the Great 
Lights, with reference to historical fact as 
desired. 

2. To survey the Great Lights in a more complete 
manner from the point of view of the evolution of 
ritual and practice, and, based upon this survey, 
to develop a philosophical interpretation. 

Speaking generally, one problem with the first approach 
is that speculation and interpretation can arbitrarily be 
made to go in any desired direction, buttressed by the 
inclusion of a smattering of such historical facts as may 
be convenient. This approach is extremely common. It 
results in a multitude of interpretations and a lack of 
consensus within the Craft. It is true that we pride 
ourselves on the freedom of the individual Mason in inter- 
preting the meaning of our ceremonies for himself, but it 
seems at times that this tendency has reached the point of 
an anarchic permissiveness of interpretation so pervasive 
as to be frustrating, not conducive to enlightenment, and 
intellectually displeasing. 

Another problem with the first approach is that it 
encourages interpretations which, even though received with 
goodwill and an open and impartial mind, seem clearly 
unwarranted. To take one small example, though the Brethren 
present may well be aware of the fact that the V.S.L. is 
not the Christian Bible but a symbol of a divinely-revealed 



34 



moral code, I venture to say that a great many worthy rank- 
and-file members of the Craft are not aware of this simple 
fact. Moreover, should any of them attempt to investigate 
the V.S.L. in Masonic literature, they will encounter 
innumerable discourses on the Holy Bible. To take another 
example, how many Brethren still take our legends literally? 
How many of those of us here present were at one time 
informed about our direct descent as speculative Masons 
from the days of Solomon, the Pharohs of Egypt, or some 
antideluvian era lost in remote antiquity? But matters such 
as these pale in comparison with extremes of interpretation 
which call attention to the Masonic relevance of the move- 
ments of celestial bodies, the measurements of the pyramids, 
the Kabbala, and similar occult matters. 

It has been my hope that by supplementing our present 
ritual by an examination of our origins and historical 
evolution, a broader base would be created for philosophical 
interpretation, and consequently for the achievement of 
something capable of being accorded wide acceptance. Allow 
me to recap the major points very briefly. 

In the historical section, I have explained: 

1. That, by way of definition and introduction, consid- 
erable evolution of the meaning of the terms "Light" 
and "Great Light" has occurred, and that the 
symbolic expression of the Great Lights is a modern 
phenomenon dating back only to the early 18th 
century. 

2. That, historically and in present practice, the 
V.S.L. has not been identified with the Holy Bible 
alone, but rather with any accepted revelation of 
the Great Architect regardless of creed. Physically 
it serves as a foundation for the other Great Lights, 
a fact with obvious symbolic portents. 

3. That, after attempting to define the Square 
physically, it is apparent that this great Light 
is a symbol identifiable with the Second Degree 
in a sense beyond that of a W.T. It is inferior 
in status to the Compasses, a fact acknowledged by 
its physical position on the altar. That the Square 
has been an emblem of the Master of the Lodge since 
the first quarter of the 18th century at least is 
not a contradiction but a reflection of the histor- 
ical relationship between this office and the 
degree of Fellowcraft. 

and 4. That the Compasses, in both operative and specula- 
tive times, have been regarded with esteem as a 
superior instrument, yet, paradoxically, this 
symbol only achieved due attention with the emerg- 
ence and popularization of the Third Degree. This 
is shown by the fact that, except for reference 
during oaths, it was, until well into the latter 
half of the 18th century, neither prominent in 
ritual, nor (if extant Scottish Lodge inventories 



- 35 



are any indication) physically very much in 
evidence in the Lodge room. This superior Great 
Light is, therefore, a Third Degree symbol of the 
Master Mason, and of the attainment of the final 
stage of enlightenment. Its use by the Grand 
Master reflects the exalted status of this symbol, 
and this use as an emblem of office in no way 
detracts from its identification with the Third 
Degree. 

Basing our symbolic interpretation on this and other 
historical, as well as contemporary information, what may 
be concluded? There is a clear gradation of the Great 
Lights, not in terms of their instrinsic importance, but in 
terms of symbolizing the phases of a Brother's enlightenment. 
This historically-supported judgement leads to the theme of 
gradual enlightenment that I feel underlies our whole ritual, 
and which I have expressed in at least three different 
variations which, for the sake of brevity, I will not attempt 
to summarize. These are the Light metaphor, the allegory of 
the Temple, and progression of knowledge. 

Furthermore, it is by recourse to ancient ritual 
versions that the meaning of the Compasses propounded in 
this paper is derived. The Compasses signify not a moral 
limitation imposed upon a Brother, but instead that state 
of virtue, beyond the grasp of reason, which is intuited 
through divine inspiration. It is in this way that a 
Brother progresses from obedience to the moral law to a 
comprehension of the essence of morality. And the necessary 
precondition for such enlightenment, symbolized by the 
Center, is the inner transformation to the state of virtue 
which we may refer to obliquely as "the true heart," that 
ideal goodness from which right action invariably emanates. 

Such reasoning, grounded in historical analysis, would 
seem to lead us to the view that the primary goal of Free- 
masonry is the attainment of virtue achieved through and 
reinforcing our veneration of the Great Architect. If we 
accept the opinion that pursuit of the highest good is the 
noblest of life's goals, then, Brethren, it must follow 
that Masonry is a prescription for life itself. 

THANK THE SPEAKER AND REVIEWERS 

R.W.Bro. Wm. Pellow in thanking the speaker stated 
this was an extensively researched paper, well documented 
and succinctly presented. The material was a stimulation 
to the well skilled and knowledgeable Masons as well as to 
the newer members of the Craft. 

Bro. Pellow also thanked the three reviewers for their 
contribution and commented that the function of the reviewers 
was an important asset in maintaining the quality of the 
papers. Their role is to keep a researcher sharp, intel- 
lectual, accurate and precise. 

In concluding his remarks he expressed the hope that 
the Lodge would be privileged to hear more from Bro. Barnes 
in the future. 



36 - 



R.W.Bro. Groshaw added his personal thanks to the 
speakers and included a special thanks to R.W.Bro. Bill 
Deller, General Chairman of Masonic Education for the Two 
London Districts for inviting The Heritage Lodge to hold 
a Regular Meeting in London. R.W.Bro. Deller responded by- 
introducing each member of the combined committee. 

R.W.Bro. Hugh M. Cree, speaking on behalf of the Two 
London Districts thanked the Worshipful Master and Members 
of The Heritage Lodge and also R.W.Bro. Ed Carson who 
acted as the liaison for the excellent program. 

To mark the occasion, V.W.Bro. L. Ferguson presented 
to the Worshipful Master a framed picture of the Inaugura- 
tion of Bro. Robert Burns as Poet Laureate in Canongate 
Kilwinning Lodge No. 2 Edinburgh, Scotland. The picture 
had been presented to the Masons in the London Districts 
by a Masonic Widow. In acknowledging the gift, R.W.Bro. 
Groshaw stated that it would be turned over to the Archives 
of The Heritage Lodge. 

CLOSE THE LODGE 



Following a few brief announcements and the thanks 
expressed by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley to the local 
arrangements committee for providing the refreshments, 
Lodge was closed in harmony at 5:05 p.m. 



the 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1980 - 1981 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 

59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R. W. Bro. Talbot L. Peyton 

46 Culpepper Dr. , Waterloo, N2L 5L1 

LODGE OFFICERS 
1980 - 1981 



W.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


I. P.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.W. 


W.Bro. 


J.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


J.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


i.e. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.S. 


W.Bro. 


J.S. 


R.W.Bro. 



Ronald E. Groshaw 
Donald S. Grinton 
George E. Zwicker 
Balfour LeGresley 
David C. Bradley 
C. Edwin Drew 
Robert S. Throop 
Albert A. Barker 
Edsel C. Steen 



Tyler 

Sec'y. 

A/Sec' y. 

Treas. 

D.C. 

Chap. 

Organist 

Historian 



R.W.Bro. 
V.W.Bro 
R.W.Bro 
R.W.Bro 
R.W.Bro 
W.Bro 
R.W.Bro 
W.Bro 



C.F. Grimwood 

, Jacob Pos 

. E.V. Ralph 

, G.J. Powell 

, Keith Flynn 

, Rev. G. Rivers 

. Len R. Hertel 

. Henry G. Edgar 



- 37 - 

SEVENTEENTH REGULAR MEETING 
PROCEEDINGS 



The Seventeenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, March 18, 1981, with 10 
Officers, 20 Members and 7 Visitors for a total of 37 Masons 
as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:30 p.m. 
by the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, who 
welcomed the Brethren and expressed his thanks to the 
Brethren for coming out so soon after the last meeting. He 
also informed the Brethren that Mrs. Charles Grimwood was 
seriously ill in the Cambridge Hospital. In the absence 
of R.W.Bro. Grimwood, the Worshipful Master appointed R.W. 
Bro. James Curtis as Tyler for the evening. 



CONFIRMING MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Carson, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. A.W. Watson that, as the minutes of the Sixteenth 
Regular Meeting would be circulated to the Membership they 
be accepted as if read. Carried. 



CORRESPONDENCE 
The following items of correspondence have been received 

1. Letter from W.Bro. P.J. Jeffrey, Secretary, The William 
S. McVittie Masonic Bursary Committee, dated Feb. 20, 
1981, and including application forms advising the 
members of the Lodges in Waterloo District of how 
their Sons and Daughters may apply for a Bursary. Three 
awards of $200 were presented to a daughter of a New 
Hope Lodge Member, and to a daughter and a son of 
deceased members of Temple Lodge and Concord Lodge, 
respectively. 

2. Letter from Bro. Gordon R. Brittain, Charter Member of 
The Heritage Lodge, dated March 2, 1981, offering his 
services to do the paper on Quasi Masonic Bodies. 

3. Letter from W.J.C. Noble, Sec ' y. -Treas. Sudbury- 
Manitoulin District Masters and Wardens Association, 
dated March 6, 1981, stating that at their Regular 
Meeting on March 2, 1981, and after a short Resume' of 
The Heritage Lodge by W.Bro. Terry Thorn, the following 
motion by W.Bro. Thorn and R.W.Bro. R.T. Runciman was 
passed: 

"That the Sudbury-Manitoulin District Masters 
and Wardens Association A.F.&A.M., extend an 
invitation to The Heritage Lodge No. 730, to hold 



- 38 - 



their fall meeting in Sudbury." 

The facilities of the Masonic Temple would be available 
for the occasion, an early reply would be appreciated. 

4. Letter from W.Bro. T.J. Thorn, Member of The Heritage 
Lodge, dated March 10, 1981 advising that we would be 
hearing from the Masters and Wardens Association of 
S.M. District, re: fall meeting; and expressing his 
pleasure and support of the concept of holding Regular 
Meetings of The Heritage Lodge in outlying Districts. 

5. Letter from R. W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls, dated March 
10, 1981, acknowledging receipt of earlier correspon- 
dence. He suggested we change the name of one of our 
proposed papers from "Quasi Masonic Orders", because 
that inplies that they are not recognized by most 
Masons, to Those Orders Not recognized by Our Grand 
Lodge, but Patronized by many Masons". He included 
the following list that might be considered: 

Royal Order of Scotland 

Red Cross of Constantine 

York Rite Sovereign College 

The Shrine 

Royal and Select Masters 

Royal Ark Mariners 

The Demolay Order 

The Tall Cedars of Lebanon 

The Allied Masonic Degrees 

Royal Order of Jesters 

Rosicrucians 

6. Letter from the Office of The Grand Secretary, dated 
March 12, 1981, which reads in part: 

"M. W.Bro. N.R. Richards, Grand Master, herewith 
authorizes the proposed meeting to be held in the 
Temple of Goodwood Lodge No. 159, Richmond, 
Ontario, on Saturday, May 16, 1981, at 9:00 a.m., 
provided Sections 274, 275 and 276 are observed 
in their entirety." 

Sincerely and Fraternally 

R.E. Davies, 
Grand Secretary. 



MOTION RE: CORRESPONDENCE 

Moved by V. W.Bro. R.D. Langs, seconded by R. W.Bro. D.C, 
Bradley, that the letters be received and any items for 
discussion be held over for the Committee on General 
Purposes. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $52.58 were pre- 
sented, and on a motion by W.Bro. Wm. Boratynec seconded 
by W.Bro. Geo. Zwicker were passed and ordered paid. 



- 39 - 

Guelph Printing Service Limited, 

500 #8 Envelopes, (Printed) , Inv. 20329 $26.54 
W.Bro. Albert Barker, Senior Stewards Ace. 

Refreshments for March 18, 1981 26.04 

TOTAL $52.58 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for Affiliation were received as follows: 

1. WELLWOOD, Samuel Leland, P.G.S.; 4 Cunningham Cres., 
R.R. #3, Orillia, Ontario; Age 76; Retired Bank Manager; 
member of Orillia Lodge No. 192, G.R.C.; recommended by 
V. W.Bro. Laurie Brandridge and V. W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown. 

2. DEMPSEY, William Allan, P.M.; P.O. Box 181, Belleville, 
Ontario; Age 75; Retired Dept. of Agr . Canada; member of 
Lake Lodge No. 215, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. E.S. 
P. Carson and R. W.Bro. G. Robt. Jackson. 

3. LOVE, Kenneth Robert, P.M.; 38 Lappin Ave., Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 44; Firefighter; member of St. Johns Lodge 
No. 75, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. Ed Drew and 

R. W.Bro. David C. Bradley. 

4. BUCHANAN, James McLuskey, M.M.; 12 Lowry Square, Scar- 
borough, Ontario; Age 34; member of St. Johns Lodge No. 
75, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. Ed Drew and R.W. 
Bro. David C. Bradley. 

5. CORNELIUS, Gary, M.M.; 16 Sharon St., St. Catharines, 
Ontario; Age 31; member of St. Andrews Lodge No. 661, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. Charles A. Sankey and 
W.Bro. George A. Campbell. 

6. PHOENIX, Francis Robert, M.M.; 147 Manitoba St., 
Stouffville, Ontario; Age 61; Retired; member of Richard- 
son Lodge No. 136, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. 
Frank Bruce and R.W. Bro. Ed Drew. 

7. PRYDE, Robert Hood, M.M. ; 90 Prince Charles Dr., 

St. Catharines, Ontario; Age 46; Machinist; member of 
St. Andrews Lodge No. 661, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. 
George A. Campbell and R.W. Bro. Charles A. Sankey. 

MOTION RE: PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Regularly moved by W.Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by 
R.W. Bro. Balfour LeGresley, that the Petitions be received, 
published in the next Lodge Summons and balloted on at the 
next Regular Meeting. Motion Carried. 



- 40 



RECEIVING VISITORS 



R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley introduced to the Members 
and Visitors of the Lodge, Bro. James Mackay, the newest 
E.A. from University Lodge, Toronto. 

The acting D.C. was admitted to introduce R.W.Bro. 
Duncan J. McFadgen, D.D.G.M. , Hamilton "A"; R.W.Bro. John 
Burnett, P.G. Reg.; and Bro. H. Eagleson. 



AT THE ALTAR 

W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, Lodge Chaplin presented the 
Altar Message: 

Brethren: 

In the longest so-called "Chapter" of all Scripture - 
the 119th Psalm - the 105th Verse states: "Thy word is a 
lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path. " Small wonder 
that Masons have picked up this statement of the Psalmist 
and used it as the foundation of our Order's teaching. 

As we grope and stumble through the mental and spirit- 
ual darkness of this "World" we call "Life" - what a relief 
and privilege it is to find a sure source of direction and 
"light to lighten that darkness". So the first Great Light 
of Masonry has always been, and continues to be the Volume 
of the Sacred Law - a lamp to our feet and a light to our 
path. 

Let Us Pray: 

Thou Divine Light, bring us, we pray, out of the 
darkness of ignorance and despair into the light and peace 
of thy presence, and lead us into a fuller and richer 
appreciation of thyself, and of one another, as we move 
forward in the spirit of true brotherhood to a meaningful 
life lived in the light of Thy Most Holy Word. Amen. 

So Mote It Be 



PAPER PRESENTATION 

In the basence of R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, the Worshipful 
Master called on R.W.Bro. David Bradley, who introduced 
the guest speaker Brother Timothy Harold Barnes. 

Bro. Barnes graduated from Trinity College, University 
of Toronto, with an Honours B.A. in Modern History. While 
at University he worked part time for the Documentation 
Department of the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario, 
and, upon graduation, obtained the position of Documentalist 
with the A.R.F.O. and was instrumental in designing and 
implementing an information retrieval system for scientific 
literature. In addition he edited and published four 
standard reference works on alcohol and drug medical research, 



41 



In his present capacity as Records Services Manager 
for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, he has designed 
and supervised several major information retrieval systems, 
and has instituted efficiency measures resulting in savings 
to the taxpayer of more than $300,000 annually. 

Bro. Barnes was initiated, passed and raised in Friend- 
ship Lodge No. 729, Pickering, in 1977; and is currently 
the Senior Deacon. He is Chairman of the Education Committee 
of his Lodge and a member of the Toronto District 3 Education 
Committee. 



THE GREAT LIGHTS OF MASONRY: SOME 



QUERIES AND FACTS 



The Great Lights are the dominant, most powerful symbols 
of Craft Masonry. They comprehend, I believe, the essential 
elements of our system, involving the concepts of the attain- 
ment of personal virtue, moral rectitude of conduct towards 
our fellow human beings, and reverence for God and His works. 

These symbols are, in fact, crucial to Masonry as we 
recognize it in and beyond this jurisdiction. The 1929 dec- 
laration of the basic principles of the Craft by the Grand 
Lodges of England, Scotland, and Ireland stated that a 
belief in the G.A.O.T.U. and His revealed will, boligation 
of candidates on or within full view of the open V.S.L., 
and display of the three Great Lights of Masonry in the 
Lodge at work are fundamental requirements for the mainten- 
ance of fraternal relations. Since then, the Grand Lodge 
of Canada in Ontario and others in communication with these 
bodies have adopted this policy. 

Tonight, Brethren, I will investigate five questions 
concerning the Great Lights. After this, I think you will 
agree with me that these symbols are well worth investigat- 
ing, and the insight gained into our emblems and ceremonies 
will repay our attention. 

Questions 

1. Why do we use the term, "Volume of the Sacred Law", 
rather than the "Bible"? 

The term, "Volume of the Sacred Law" dates back to the 
formation of the United Grand Lodge of England. At this 
time, all Christian references, of which there were many, 
were excised from our ritual. The reason, of course, was 
to accommodate and put at ease those persons throughout the 
world who were eligible for Masonry on moral grounds, but 
were not of the Christian faith. 

In the edition of William Preston's Illustrations of 
Masonry published after this date, we find the following 
footnote concerning the V.S.L.: 



42 



"In England, the Bible; but in countries where that 
book is unknown, whatever is understood to contain 
the will or law of God." 

By this time, there were several Lodges composed of 
Jewish Brethren in Britain, but, also, there had been other 
precedents involving the entry of non-Christians into the 
Craft. For example, during the previous century, the 
Scottish Lodge of Canongate Kilwinning had kept an annotated 
copy of the Koran for obligation of Moslems. During the 
19th century, when the British Empire expanded ultimately 
to encompass one-fifth of the globe and one fifth of its 
inhabitants, the admission of non-Christians became irresis- 
tible. Eventually, denominationally-hybrid scenes were not 
uncommon overseas. By 1886, for example, the South African 
Freemason reported an incident in a Burmese Lodge, whereby 
a Buddhist was initiated while a Parsee was in the Chair, 
a Hindu was J.W., and the J.D. was a Moslem. 

2. What Volumes of the Sacred Law, other than the Bible, are 
acceptable? 

If we understand the Volume of the Sacred Law to be 
the revealed will of a Supreme Being who holds out the 
prospect of immortality, at least ten Sacred works would 
qualify: 

1. The pentateuch or Old Testament of the Hebrews 

2. The New Testament of the Christians, though many 
would include or prefer the complete Holy Bible 

3. The Koran of the Moslems 

4. The Zend Avesta of the Parsees or Zoroastrians 

5. The Dhammapada of the Mahayana Buddhists 

6. The Granth of the Sikhs 

7. The Bhagavad Gita of the Hindus 

8. The Tao Te King of the Taoists 

9. The Rig Veda and other Vedas of the Brahmins 
10. The Book of Mormon of the Latter Day Saints 

For our Roman Catholic Brethren, it should be mentioned 
that, strictly speaking, the Holy Bible includes the 
Apocrypha, those additional works which persons of this 
faith incorporate into the Old Testament. The Mahayana 
Buddhists, known as those of the Upper or Greater Teaching, 
also accept the Holy Bible as a sacred work; this group, 
originating in Northern India, Tibet, China, Korea, and 
Japan, should be distinguished from the Hinayana Buddhists, 
those of the Lower or Lesser Teaching, and originating in 
Southern India, Ceylon, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and 
Cambodia--this latter group does not accept the principles 
of a Supreme Being. 

The form of obligation, incidentally, varies among 
these denominations. For Jews, the Torah or Pentateuch, 
the first five books of the Old Testament, is desirable, as 
is the availability of the text in Hebrew. However, it is 
permissible for a Jew to take an obligation upon the whole 
of the Old Testament, but not the Old and New Testaments 
combined. It is also desirable that, during an obligation, 
a Jewish candidate stand with head covered. 



- 43 - 



As for other denominations, some Moslems prefer to take 
an obligation standing, and, rather than kiss the V.S.L., 
they touch it with their forehead. Hindus as well do not 
seal an obligation by kissing the Book. Both Moslems and 
Sikhs generally prefer that, when not in use, the open 
V.S.L. be covered with a veil. 

3. What is the proper form of the Square to be used in 
Lodge? 

There are two basic forms of Squares used in Lodges. 
The first is the try-Square of the stonemason, a plain 
square with arms of equal length, used for testing the 
accuracy of cut or laid stone. The second type is the 
"gallows" Square, with arms in the ratio of four to three, 
in conformity with the 47th Proposition of Euclid. 

In the 1760 English exposure, Three distinct knocks , 
we find this comment: 

"The Master always sits in the East, or stands with 
the Bible before him, and if it is the Apprentice's 
Lecture, he opens it about the Second Epistle of Peter, 
with the Compasses laid thereon and the Points of them 
covered with a little Box Square of Lignum Vita, about 
4 inches each Way..." 

On the other hand, this same book also mentions the candidate 
during the Entered Apprentice obligation taking, "one step 
upon the first step of a right angle oblong square"--in 
other words the gallows Square. 

There is no definite answer to this question. Even 
today, Brethren, there is some confusion on this matter. 
If you look at our First Degree Tracing Board, which dates 
back to 1849 in its final form, you will see both the try 
and gallows Squares represented. 

It would seem that the try Square is preferred when 
conjoined with the Compasses, simply because of the symmet- 
rical, orderly appearance produced. In the earlier days 
of Masonry, when candidates were initiated physically within 
the angle of a Square placed before them on the floor, this 
Square seems normally to have been the gallows Square. 

4. Why are the Great Lights so called? 

Although the term, "Great Lights" appears in numerous 
early versions of the Masonic ritual, it applied, until 
sometime between 1745 and 1760, to what we now know as the 
three Lesser Lights, the Sun, Moon, and Master of the Lodge. 
The term in the modern sense first appears in 1760 with 
the publication of Three distinct knocks . 

We refer to them as "Lights", because, in Masonic 
terms, Light is true knowledge or wisdom, emanating ultimat- 
ely from God. During the eighteenth century, candidates 
for initiation were commonly obligated upon the 1st Chapter 
of the Gospel according to John, which states: 



"In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with 
God, and the Word was God. ...In him was life and the 
life was the light of men. And the light shineth in 
darkness; and the darkness comprehendeth it not. ... 
That was the true Light, which lighteth every man 
that cometh into the world." 

For the candidate, the V.S.L. is of primary relevance. 
It is desirable that he be acquainted with the moral law. 
We can easily see that this first symbol, the V.S.L. , is a 
direct source of enlightenment, one which the new Brother 
will be able to use without prolonged apprenticeship. But, 
what of the other Great Light symbols? How can these mute, 
material objects dispense "Light"? 

Clearly, these latter symbols are "Lights" because 
of the powerful associations which we come to have for them, 
and, by further contemplation of the moral concepts which 
they embody, we are stimulated towards an improved state 
of mind and behaviour. As William Preston said in his 
Second Lecture: 

"In the illustration of our ceremonies, the duties of 
morality are zealously enforced, & in the explanation 
of our hieroglyphical emblems, the power of virtue is 
faithfully displayed." 

In our own ritual, we are informed that every character, 
figure, and emblem has a moral tendency, and serves to 
inculcate the practice of virtue in all its genuine profes- 
sors. 

We should view the Great Lights as symbols of our 
progress, as well. Initially, we are prepared to be made 
Masons in our hearts. Subsequently, we are exposed to the 
Moral Law, which, if we devote ourselves to learning and 
applying it to our conduct, will in turn make the other 
Great Lights comprehensible. 

5. Why are the Great Lights also "furniture"? 

The term, "furniture", for the Great Lights appeared 
for the first time in the Wilkinson MS. of 1727. The term 
was adopted by the Moderns' Grand Lodge, and has persisted 
in our ritual until the present day. It alludes to the 
allegory of the Temple, which has become prominent in our 
work. 

"What is Masonry?" we are asked in William Preston's 
Second Lecture. The answer, we find, is that, "Masonry is 
a peculiar system of science explained under the allegory 
of a building and communicated by symbols." 

In the First Degree Lecture, we learn that the Universe 
is the Temple of the Diety whom we serve. But, more import- 
antly, the Temple is also represented to us as the Masonic 
fraternity or Lodge, patterned after and perpetuating the 
achievement of K.S. and H.A.B. 



45 - 



Thirdly, the Temple may be seen as the personal, 
spiritual structure built by a Mason in his progress towards 
the attainment or virtue and enlightenment. In the margin 
of Emanuel Zimmermann's eighteenth century copy of J & B, 
the following note may be seen: 

"What do Freemasons busy themselves with in Lodges? 
In building prisons for vices and temples for virtues. 
That is to say, the Temple of Solomon being a Terrest 
frj ial Temple was soon destroyed by the hands fofj 
men or times, But we are occupied in Building a 
Spiritual Temple which is to last for every and ever, 
hopping £sic} that you will prove your Self a faith 
fuil B. among us, to the end you may be rewarded in 
that Celestial Temple." 

In the Charity Lecture, the initiate is informed that 
he, being newly admitted into Masonry, is placed at the 
N.E. angle of the Lodge figuratively to represent the 
foundation stone, and he is admonished that, from the founda- 
tion laid that evening, he may raise a superstructure per- 
fect in its parts and honourable to the builder. Later 
it is explained that his Masonic goal is to progress towards 
a degree of spiritual attainment which is the summit of 
Masonry, figuratively speaking, an etherial mansion veiled 
from mortal eyes. 

Viewed in this way, we can readily comprehend the term 
"furniture." The symbols of the V.S.L., the Square and 
Compasses are prominently displayed in the Temple. Once 
within this spiritual ediface, the Brother is expected to 
occupy himself with the use and contemplation of the furni- 
ture, those sacred artifacts within, that he may realize 
his spiritual potential and the hope of partaking in the 
blessed promises therein contained. 

The reason for our veneration of the Great Lights, 
Brethren, in my opinion, is that the ideas which they 
embody lie at the very core of our identity as Masons. 
Each portrays a meaning which is at once recognizable to all 
of us in the Craft, and yet significant in a very personal 
way as well. 

One learned Brother portrayed a common problem in our 
Great fraternity when he wrote, obviously discouraged, 
that: 

"...Many Brethren, while recognizing that Freemasonry 
is 'illustrated by symbols ' --that is, that the symbols 
point the way, or give the key to, the allegory--do 
not take the trouble to probe into the meaning of those 
symbols, and accordingly they are to those Brethren 
mere forms — not guide posts: signs that they recognize 
as belonging to the craft, but which fail to lead them 
to these 'hidden mysteries' that they are bidden in the 
Second Degree to study. The 'square' may mean to them 
rectitude and nothing more. The 'compasses' may lead 
their thoughts to virtue and brotherly love: while 
the 'point within the circle' from which they 'cannot 
err' teaches them nothing at all." 



46 



Time has not permitted more than a superficial investi- 
gation of the historical and philosophical import of the 
Great Lights tonight. It is my hope, however, that I may 
have stimulated those of you Brethren present to further 
study of these and other of our symbols, for which, in 
terms of your own satisfaction, I assure you there will be 
ample reward. 



INFORMATION DISCUSSION 

R.W.Bro. L.R. Hertel - "The moral code alluded to in 
your remarks is primarily Christian; but you talk about the Uni- 
versality of Masonry. Do the Chinese, East Indians of 
other religions have the same morality?" 

Bro. Barnes - "An excellent question, yes they do 
basically have the same moral code." 

V.W.Bro. J. Pos - "This is not a question, but a comment 
that tomorrow evening, March 19, a Taoist would be initiated 
in Trillium Lodge No. 724, Guelph and the Tao Te King would 
be placed on the Altar with the V.S.L." 

R.W.Bro. Groshaw formally thanked Bro. Barnes for his 
excellent contribution to the program of the Lodge. 

The Lodge was called off to refreshment at 8:42 p.m. 
for sufficient time to conduct a Committee of General 
Purpose Meeting. 

The Lodge was called on to Labour at 10:40 p.m. 

MOTIONS: 

1. Moved by R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph, seconded by R.W.Bro. D.J. 
McFadgen to accept the Report of the Committee on 
General Purposes. Carried. 

2. Moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, seconded by V.W. Bro. L. 
Brandridge that the Lodge Secretary be granted an 
Honorarium of $350.00 for the current year. Carried. 

3. Moved by W.Bro. Wm. Boratynec, seconded by W.Bro. George 
Zwicker , that the Lodge Museum Committee approach the 
Grand Lodge to discuss the proposed plans with reference 
to relocating a tinsmith shop and former Lodge Room on 
the second floor (formerly the home of Blackwood Lodge 
No. 311,) which is destined to fall under the wrecker's 
hammer if no action is taken in the very near future. 
Motion Carried. 

4. Moved by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, seconded by R.W. 
Bro. David Bradley, that the Lodge accept the invitation 
from Sudbury-Manitoulin District to hold our Regular 
Meeting in September, 1981, in the Masonic Temple in 
Sudbury, and that we suggest the date of Saturday, 
September 26, 1981. Carried. 



47 



5. Moved by R.W.Bro. Len Hertel seconded by W.Bro. Rev. 
Gray Rivers that the Ad Hoc Lodge Committee on Masonic 
Music proceed with plans for a Masonic Music Night for 
Masons and submit a complete report to the Lodge. 
Carried. 

At this time W.Bro. Rivers in commenting on the very 
real possibility that one of our most eminent Members in 
the person of R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod may be given the 
great honor of being installed as the Worshipful Master of 
Quatuor Coronate Lodge No. 2 076, London, England on the 2nd 
Thursday in November, 1983, offered his special services 
to arrange transportation for any Brethren who would like to 
support Bro. McLeod on that significant occasion. 

6. Moved by W.Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by R.W.Bro. Ed 
Drew and thirded by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, that 
the Chaplain and Deacons be a Committee of three to 
begin planning for the event, and that the above comments 
be placed in the Lodge Summons. 

Bro. Barnes announced that Toronto District 3 Education 
Night would be held on April 10, 1981, in the Scarborough 
Temple. 

Following a number of other announcements, the Lodge was 
closed in harmony at 10:55 p.m. 



APRIL 27, 1981 (Monday evening) - The Ladies of Hamilton 
District B will be entertained when the 18th Century 
Degree Cast of Wellington District put on their "Play" 
in Stoney Creek. The dramatization, in full costume 
of the period, will typify Freemasonry in the 18th 
Century. 

MAY 16, 1981 (Saturday morning) - Eighteenth Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge, under the auspices of Goodwood 
Lodge No. 159, in the Masonic Temple in Richmond, at 
9:00 a.m. V. W.Bro. Alfred Edward Harrington will pre- 
sent a paper dealing with the Early History of Free- 
masonry in the Ottawa Area. Several masonic artifacts 
will be on display. 

MAY 20, 1981 (Wednesday evening) - Nineteenth Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge to be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple, Cambridge, at 7:30 p.m. The Lodge will 
be called off for sufficient time to hold a meeting of 
the Committee on General Purposes. There will be no 
paper scheduled for this combined meeting. 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1981 (Saturday), (Not Confirmed) Twentieth 

Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge to be held in the 
Masonic Temple, Sudbury, under the auspices of the 
Sudbury-Manitoulin District Masters and Wardens Associa- 
tion. R.W.Bro. Lawrence Runnalls is tentatively 
scheduled to present his paper Women in Freemasonry. 



48 - 



PROPOSED PAPERS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS 

1. Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge, but patron- 
ized by many Masons, by Bro. Gordon R. Brittain. 

2. Lodges formerly on the Register of the Grand Lodge of 
Canada in the Province of Ontario, and now struck off, 
by Bro. John E. Taylor. 

3. Masonic Research Lodges - An Up-To-Date Review, by R.W. 
Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

4. Anti-Masonic Groups Individual, Political and Ecclesias- 
tical, suggested by R.W. Bro. E.J. Burns Anderson. 

Still looking for a volunteer. 

5. Important Masons of the First Provincial Grand Lodge in 
Canada, 1792-1822, by W.Bro. Robert Butler. 

6. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk 
Indian Chief, by V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos (when he has time). 

7. Lodge Tracing Boards - History and Symbolism, by V. W.Bro 
Jacob Pos. Since there was no response to a plea for 
information on unique Lodge Tracing Boards, this subject 
has been placed in abeyance. 

NOTE: We are most anxious to hear from volunteers to do 
research, make paper presentations, act as paper 
reviewers or make suggestions. Please contact the 
Secretary or R.W. Bro. Frank Bruce, 46 Muir Dr., Scarbor- 
ough, Ont. M1M 3B4, phone (416) 261-8147. 

FROM THE SECRETARY'S DESK 

1. The following Members have changed their addresses and 
are no longer receiving their Proceedings: 

Wm. R. Tompkins, 480 Orchard Dr., Oakville; T.A. Silagy, 
Lakeshore Dr., St. Catharines; Malcolm Morin, 23 Loft- 
house Square, Scarborough; Wm. Hardy Craig, 1722 Finch 
Ave., Pickering; B.D. Stapley, Apt. 327, 5785 Yonge St., 
Willowdale. 

If anyone has up-to-date information as to the where- 
abouts of any of the above please advise the Secretary. 

2. We are currently updating the Lodge mailing list. The 
information will include name, address, masonic rank, 
name of the single preferred other Lodge you wish to be 
classed as a member, and the Masonic District. Also 
the telephone number. If there has been any change in 
any of the above in the past 4 years please notify the 
Secretary. 

3. Your dues card (membership card) is usually mailed out 
with the next Proceedings after you have sent in your 
payment. Please examine the envelope carefully to make 
certain you do not throw away your membership card with 
the envelope. 



$roceebmg£ 

®i)t Heritage Hobqt jSo-730 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Ronald E. Groshaw, W.M. 
31 Princess Margaret Bd 
Islington, Ontario, 
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CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Sec'y/Editor 
10 Mayfield Avenue, 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 

Home (519) 821-4995 
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Vol. 04, No. 04 Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



May, 1981 



This Bulletin contains the summons for the next two 
Regular Meetings, the General Purpose Committee Meeting, the 
Proceedings of the Eighteenth Regular Meeting held on Satur- 
day, May 16, 1981, in Richmond, and the Nineteenth Regular 
Meeting held on Wednesday, May 20, 1981, in Cambridge, also 
several important announcements and notices of coming events. 

PLEASE NOTE: The opinions expressed by the Speakers, Review- 
ers and Participants in the Paper Presentations 
and Discussions presented in these Proceedings 
are not necessarily those of The Heritage Lodge 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 



By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. 
Groshaw, you are hereby summond to attend the Twentieth 
Regular Meeting of the Lodge to be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple located at the North-East corner of 
the intersection of Highways No. 401 and No. 24 on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 16TH, 1981, AT 7:30 P.M. 

Prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge; also 
the election of Officers for the year 1981-82. At this 
meeting we shall be balloting on 10 applications for affili- 
ation. Their names and particulars are printed on page 6 
and page 19 of these Proceedings Vol. 4, No. 4. 

EMERGENT MEETING IN SUDBURY 

The Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw, hereby 
informs you that an Emergent Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
will be held in the Masonic Temple, Sudbury, under the 
auspices of the Sudbury-Manitoulin District Masters and 
Wardens Association on: 



I 



2 - 



SATURDAY, AFTERNOON, OCTOBER 3RD, 1981, AT 2:00 P.M. 

On this occasion, we shall be privileged to hear a 
paper titled "Women in Freemasonry" prepared by R.W.Bro. 
J. Lawrence Runnalls. Brother Runnalls has written papers 
for our Lodge before, and we look forward to another 
interesting and exciting experience. For those wishing 
bus transportation to Sudbury please refer to page number 22 
of this report. 

J. Pos, 
Secretary. 



ADIEU, A HEART-WARM, FOND ADIEU I 
(Bro. Robert Burns, first Masonic Poet-Laureate) 

Composed on the occasion of what he conceived to be his 
last visit to St. James Lodge, Tarbolton, in June, 17 86, and 
sung by him at the closing banquet. "In the first three 
stanzas of this immortal ode, in which the fraternal feeling 
is so strong", says Bro. Robert Morris, "we have all the part: 
of a Masonic song - a collection of Masonic references, in 
the most fitly chosen words - esoteric suggestions of the 
most distinct character, and, in the last stanza, a personal 
dedication to Wallace, the R.W. Master of the Lodge". 

Adieu, a heart-warm, fond adieu, 

Dear brothers of the mystic tie! 
Ye favored, ye enlightened few, 

Companions of my social joy! 
Though I to foreign lands must hie, 

Pursuing fortune's sliddery ba,- 
.With melting heart and brimful eye, 

I'll mind you still, though far awa ' . 

Oft have I met your social band, 

An' spent the cheerful, festive night; 
Oft, honored with supreme command, 

Presided o'er the sons of light; 
And by that hieroglyphic bright, 

Which none but Craftsmen ever saw, 
Strong memory on my heart shall write 

Those happy scenes, when far awa'. 

May freedom, harmony and love 

Unite you in the grand design, 
Beneath the Omniscient Eye above, 

The glorious Architect divine ;- 
That you may keep th' unerring line, 

Still guided by the plummets law, 
Till order bright completely shine, 

Shall be my prayer when far awa'. 

And you, farewell, whose merits claim 

Justly that highest badge to wear , - 
Heaven bless - your honored, noble name, 

To Masonry and Scotia dear! 
A last request, permit me here; 

When yearly ye assemble a 
One round - I ask it with a tear, 

To him, the Bard, that's far awa'. 



EIGHTEENTH REGULAR MEETING 



PROCEEDINGS 



The Eighteenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 
7 30, G.R.C., was held in the Masonic Temple, Richmond, 
Ontario, Saturday morning, May 16, 1981, with 4 Officers, 24 
other Members and 11 Visitors for a total of 39 Masons as 
per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 9:00 a.m. by 
the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, who 
thanked those in attendance. He commented on the Grand 
Master's Reception in Smiths Falls the night before and 
promised to conclude the business of the meeting early to 
allow those masons going to the Grand Lodge Dedication at 
Pembrook, adequate time for the journey. 

CONFIRMING MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. David Bradley, 
seconded by R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen, that the minutes of the 
Seventeenth Regular Meeting of the Lodge, held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, March 
18, 1981, be accepted and confirmed as circulated in the 
Lodge Proceedings Vol. 4, No. 3, with the following correc- 
tions : 

1. The Worshipful Masters of London East and London 
West and Sister Districts were introduced by R.W. 
Bro. Donald Emerick. 

2. That the name of W.Bro. Brian Rountree be deleted 
from the list of applications on page 6 of the 



Proceedings. 



Motion Carried. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Fifteen letters were received as follows: 

1. From R.W.Bro. W. James Curtis, Member of The Heritage 
Lodge, dated March 19, 1981, expressing his concern 
over the method of assessing the Life Membership Fee. 

2. From Bro. John E. Taylor, Member of The Heritage Lodge, 
dated March 29, 1981, requesting a demit; and stating 
that age and distance prevented him from taking an 
active part in the work of the Lodge. (Brother Taylor 
is a member in good standing) . 

3. From W.Bro. W.J.C. Noble, Secretary-Treasurer, Sudbury- 
Manitoulin District Masters and Warden Association, 
dated April 1st, 1981, advising that our proposed date 
for a fall meeting of The Heritage Lodge in Sudbury 

of Saturday, September 26th, 1981, would be in conflict 
with a meeting of Alpha Lodge of the Cryptic Rite. He 
assured us that any other Saturday in September or 
October would be acceptable, and suggested September 
19th, or October 3rd. 



- 4 - 

4. From R.W.Bro. Wm. Deller, General Chairman of Masonic 
Education for the Masonic Districts of London East and 
London West, dated April 7 , 1981, extending their sincere 
appreciation for holding a Regular Meeting of our Lodge 
in their Temple and to congratulate Bro. Timothy Barnes 
for an excellent paper presentation. 

5. From M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies, Grand Secretary, dated 
April 15, 1981, outlining the agenda for the 126th 
Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge for July 13-16, 
1981, with enclosures, listing candidates for Office 

in Grand Lodge and the Board of General Purposes as 
well as a proxy form for Grand Lodge. 

6. From R.W.Bro. D.J.H. Thompson, Secretary Temple Lodge 
No. 690, Kitchener, dated April 16, 1981, advising that 
Bro. Stuart Henderson had been suspended for non-payment 
of dues. 

7. From R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph, Assistant Secretary of The 
Heritage Lodge dated April 26, 1981, enclosing his 
Report of the Membership Committee as well as the 
minutes of the last meeting of the Committee of General 
Purposes; and a number of Agenda items for the next 
meeting of that Committee. 

8. From W.Bro. Ernest G. Cosh, Secretary of the Preston- 
New Hope Masonic Holding Corporation, dated April 30, 
1981, giving the name and address of the President and 
Secretary of that Corporation to which we pay our 
rent for the use of the Temple. 

9. From M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies, Grand Secretary, dated 
May 1, 1981, granting our request to present a written 
report to Grand Lodge Board of General Purposes at the 
126th Annual Communication "outling the airms and 
objectives of The Heritage Lodge, the progress made 
toward achieving those committments, as well as a 
distribution of our membership, titles of papers pub- 
lished in the Lodge Proceedings, special publications, 
visitations throughout the Jurisdiction, new projects 

in various planning stages and possibly lodge finances". 

It is their understanding that an oral presentation 
will simply touch on the highlights of the written 
report, and greater emphasis on the proposed projects 
designed to enhance the continued growth of the lodge. 
We have been allotted a maximum of 15 minutes. 

Our request for a brief discussion of the report has 
been denied for this meeting, but there is hope that it 
may be an agenda item for discussion at the fall Board 
Meeting. 

0. From R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce, Chairman of the Lodge Com- 
mittee on Masonic Information, which is responsible for 
the Lodge Paper Presentation Program, dated May 5, 1981, 
stating that we use only the two reviews for V. W.Bro. 
Alf Harrington's paper to be presented at Goodwood Lodge 
on May 16. He also enquired about back copies of the 
Lodge Proceedings. 



11. From V.W.Bro. Wm. A. Brooks, member of The Heritage 
Lodge, dated May 5, 1981, indicating a change in life 
style and requesting his demit. (V.W.Bro. Brooks is a 
member in good standing.) 

12. From W.Bro. George Zwicker, Senior Warden of The 
Heritage Lodge, sending his regrets that he will be 
unable to attend the next two Regular Meetings of the 
Lodge and asks that his apologies be extended to the 
Worshipful Master and Brethren of Goodwood Lodge. He 
also enclosed a proposed agenda for the General Purpose 
Committee meeting scheduled for May 20, 1981. 

13. From W.Bro. Lancaster, a candidate for Affiliation, #18 
page 6 of our last Proceedings, dated May 11, 1981, 
announcing corrections to his information on the appli- 
cation form, his age is 43 and he is Worshipful Master 
of Nilestone Lodge No. 345. 

14. Letter from V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell, Charter Member 
of The Heritage Lodge, enclosing a copy of a 12 page 
report, sent to the Grand Lodge Long Range Planning 
Committee. He writes to inform us that he is working 
toward a Private Pilots Licence, ana that he is planning 
a 6 week trip to Australia and New Zealand. 

15. Letter from M. W.Bro. Robert E. Davis, Grand Secretary 
dated May 13, 1981, advising that the Grand Master, M. 
W.Bro. N.R. Richards has given much consideration to our 
request to use a reproduction of our Lodge Warrant for 
travelling purposes but has recommended that we observe, 
in its entirety, Section 275 in the Book of Constitution 
until such time as this section might become amended. 

MOTION RE: CORRESPONDENCE 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Robt. Throop, 
seconded by W.Bro. Glen Jones that the correspondence be 
received, processed in the usual manner and appropriate 
action taken. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $369.94 were pre- 
sented, and on a motion by V.W.Bro. Laurie Brandridge, 
seconded by R. W.Bro. Donald Emerick, were passed and ordered 
paid. 

Secretary's Account 

Postage for March Proceedings $110.59 

Mrs. Karen Perry, Fergus 

Typing, March Proceedings (48 pages) 48.00 

The House of Print, Guelph 

Printing "The Lodge Historian" 

Inv. #12024 211.35 

TOTAL $369.94 



- 6 



RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILITATION 

Applications for membership by affiliation were received 
from the following: 

1. LOFTUS, Robert George, P.D.D.G.M.; 5 Heathrow Court, 
Islington, Ontario; Age 70; Retired; member of Occident 
Lodge No. 346, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. R.E. 
Groshaw and V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

2. MARSHALL, G. Richard, P.M.; 1471 Hixon St., Oakville, 
Ontario; Age 63; Sales Coordinator; member of Oakville 
Lodge No. 400, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. George F. 
Moore and Bro. Charles E. Basley. 

3. CORMAN, Ellis Lee, W.M. ; R.R. #2, Beamsville, Ontario; 
Age 67; Retired; member of Thomas Hamilton Simpson Lodge 
No. 692; G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. B.A. Harris and 
W.Bro. Henry C. Wolfe. 

4. BONE, Gordon Kitchener, M.M. ; 198 Huxley Ave. South, 
Hamilton, Ontario; Age 65; Retired; member of Thomas 
Hamilton Simpson Lodge No. 692 G.R.C.; recommended by 
W.Bro. B.A. Harris and W.Bro. Henry C. Wolfe. 

5. COOKE, William Dorman, P.M.; 7 Gamble Drive, Richmond, 
Ontario; Age 45; Administration Clerk; member of Good- 
wood Lodge No. 159, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Ben 
Bolton and R.W.Bro. George Jackson. 

MOTION RE: APPLICATIONS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Wm. Isbister seconded 
by V.W.Bro. L Ferguson that the Petitions be received and 
published in the Lodge Summons for balloting at the following 
Regular Meeting. Motion carried. 

BALLOTING 

A motion by Bro. Glen Jones and R.W. Bro. David Bradley 
was approved to take a collective ballot. 

Following a favourable ballot on all applications the 
Worshipful Master declared the following Brethren eligible 
for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., by 
affiliation, and requested that each new member affix his 
signature to the Lodge Register at the earliest opportunity 
in token of submission to the Lodge By-Laws: 

R.W.Bros.: Aage Bjerknes, William H. Broomfield, 
J. Robert Larmer, John Gerald Pell, Frank Albert Standring. 

V.W.Bros.: Norman Campbell Gourlie, Alfred Edward 
Harrington, Robert George Rickward, Samuel Leland Wellwood. 

W.Bros.: Gilbert D.W. Beckett, Edwin George Buscombe, 
Robert J. Clark, William Allan Dempsey, Wilfred Thomas 
Greenhough, Kenneth Robert Love, Malcolm Mackenzie, Robert R. 
Spence. 



7 - 



Bros.: James McLuskey Buchanan, Gary Cornelius, Gene 
Emerson Davis, Morley Crawford Haynes, Robert George Lancaster 
Francis Robert Pheonix, Robert Hood Pryde and Gordon P. 
Sanders. 



PAPER PRESENTATION 

At this time, the Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. 
Frank Bruce, Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Information 
to proceed with the Paper Presentation Program. R.W.Bro. 
Bruce explained the normal procedure to the visitors and 
then called on W.Bro. William D. Cooke, Past Master of Good- 
wood Lodge No. 159 to introduce the Speaker, V. W.Bro. Alfred 
Edward Harrington. Bro. Harrington was Initiated in Green- 
wood Lodge in 1958 and is a Charter Member of Bytown Lodge 
No. 721. 



EARLY MASONRY IN THE OTTAWA VALLEY 

by 

V. W.Bro. Alfred Edward Harrington 



Masonry came to Canada with that group of individuals 
described in the records as skilled artisans and Masons in 
the year 1604. They chose as their winter base "Dochet 
Island" a piece of land some five acres in extent, and after 
building a habitation in which to winter, and cutting wood 
for fuel they practically denuded the Island. Of the seventy- 
nine individuals that were landed at "Dochet Island" thirty- 
five only survived, twenty others were described as more 
dead than alive, two only would serve a second winter in 
Canada. As had been previously arranged with the coming of 
spring, a second group described as in the former instance 
of skilled artisans and Masons, arrived in the country. We 
are informed that a search was made over a very large area 
to find a more permanent base on which to build a more 
habitable structure including some comforts that had not 
been possible on "Dochet Island", and so the habitation or 
"Port Royal" as we know it was built. Here the winter of 
1605-1606 was spent by these early working Masons, and again 
death was no stranger to them. 

One burial took place on "Goat Island" a piece of land 
some eighty-eight acres in extent in Annapolis Bay. The 
efforts involved in this burial are rather unique. As Goat 
Island is two miles from the habitation at Port Royal with 
the return trip making four miles whereas there were miles 
of land in every direction they looked. But the burial party 
did leave a stone, it contained no name simply the "Square 
and Compass" chiseled into its face and the year 1606. This 
stone was found in 1827 by a man idly wandering around the 
island. 

In 1606 the Masons began the construction of Poutrin- 
court Mills, to be built of brick made from local clay, it 
was driven by water power and was ready for use in the spring 
of 1607. It was the first grist mill and the first instance 



of automation in North America. This mill has been duplicated 
by the Nova Scotia Power Corporation, and is known as the 
"Lequille Hydro Electric Station" , the plans for the mill 
were from drawings covering the period 1550-1750 and taken 
from Diderots' Encyclopedia Volume I published in 1763. 

In 17 59 when the British destroyed by bombardment what 
would now be the lower town of Quebec City, they destroyed 
many buildings among these was the "Hospice of the Order of 
St. John of Jerusalem". When the rubble of this edifice was 
cleared away and the corner stone brought to light the "Square 
and Compass" were deeply chiseled into it plus the date 1614. 

In the year 1634, Lord Alexander "Viscount Canada" son 
of the first Earl of Stirling, Scotland, Master of the Work 
to King Charles I and a zealous craftsman founded a colony of 
Scots on the banks of the River St. Lawrence at Rimouski, 
Quebec. At that time Lord Alexander was a member of "Edin- 
burgh Lodge" No. I "Marys 1 Chapel" which has records from 
1599 and which tradition maintains was in existence in 1491. 
In 1636 his brother was the presiding officer of the famous 
"Old Operative Lodge" at Atcheson Haven Scotland claimed to 
have existed from 1555. The probabilities therefore, are 
strongly in favour of his having established an "Operative 
Lodge" among his colonists on the banks of the St. Lawrence 
in 1634. 

For ten years 1639 to 1649 a Jesuit Mission referred to 
as "Fort St. Marie" was established near what we know today 
as Midland, Ontario. Here the operative Masons toiled hard 
to build the first artificially locked waterway on the North 
American Continent. This canal five hundred feet or more 
in length enabled boats to be quickly brought into the Fort 
out of harms way and moved by locks to where the boat was to 
be placed for unloading. 

As for Fortress Louisburg, 1719-1729 the "English Lodge 
of Research" thoroughly covered the part of the operative 
Mason in the erection of this edifice. 

Masonry existed in the British Regiments stationed in 
what is now the United States before the first American 
Lodge was formed in 17 33. The Lodge "St. John's" meeting 
at the "Bunch of Grapes Tavern" on the Boston waterfront 
was credited with throwing the tea overboard in Boston Harbour 
and launching American history. 

The first mention of Speculation Masonry in Canada was 
in the year 1734, British soldiers serving in what is now 
the United States crossed into Nova Scotia to ask permission 
from officers of the "Grand Lodge of England" serving with 
the British Froces for permission to start a Regimental 
Lodge. 

The first Canadian Lodge as such dates from 1738 on a 
Charter issued by Henry Price, Provincial Grand Master of 
New England. Its members were military men. We know very 
little of this lodge as the military men to which it was 
issued were posted away from the area. 



- 9 



The records of the Craft at Boston Mass. state that in 
1732-1733 Brother Henry Price was appointed "Provincial 
Grand Master of the premier Grand Lodge of England and that 
his "Deputation was subsequently extended to all North 
America (including of course Canada) . 

In 1855 with the formation of the Grand Lodge of Canada 
in the Province of Ontario all the territory between the 
Quebec border and the River Trent was one district, known as 
the Central District, and existed from 1855 to 1867. 

Prior to this time the area now designated as the Ottawa 
Masonic Districts had but one lodge, situated in the Military 
Settlement of Richmond the year 1818 with the membership 
hailing from several different lodges, mainly in the Montreal 
area. Three members were said to be from "Wellington Persev- 
ering Lodge" whose pillar of strength was Rt. Wor. Bro. 
John Molson the original brewer, he belonged to several 
Lodges. This lodge went into darkness at about the time the 
Ancients and Moderns came together in 1813. Going beyond 
the Ottawa District a lodge existed at Burritts Rapids in 
1815, the war of 1812-1814 being still fresh in their minds 
the brethren posted several outer-guards at a considerable 
distance one from the other being informed by the Master that 
should anything untoward occur, they were to hail an alarm 
one to the other so that the Lodge could be closed and the 
contents removed from the lodge for safety. 

A Lodge existed in Perth, True Britons No. 14 in 1818 
and a lodge in South Gower No. 5 Union Lodge in 1819, and 
Rt. Wor. Bro. Philemon Wright's Columbia Lodge in Hull also 
dated to 1819, and Morning Star Lodge existed in Morphy's 
Falls (now Carleton Place) 1821-1822. The lodge on the 
Rideau at Burritts Rapids of 1815 met at irregular intervals 
going into darkness in 1845 being replaced by Kemptville No. 
7 and the lodge at South Gower Union No. 5 was also absorbed 
into Kemptville No. 7. At least some of the records of 
these two lodges have been placed in the Public Archives 
and the lodge at Kemptville is now Mount Zion No. 28. Rt. 
Wor. Bro. Philemon Wright's Lodge lasted less than ten years, 
no particular reason given for its demise and going into 
darkness. There is a remote chance that Morning Star lodge 
at Morphy's Falls may have contributed to Eureka Lodge at 
Pakenham No. 246 which has since gone into darkness, and 
Mississippi Lodge at Almonte No. 147 in part at least owes 
its existence to Eureka Lodge 246 at Pakenham. One other 
lodge North Gower lodge No. 206 E.R. ceased to exist in 
1858 due to a mixup pertaining to the turning in of foreign 
charters at the formation of the Grand Lodge of Ontario. 
That leaves us then with the two Lodges at the Military 
Settlements of Perth and Richmond. Perth the older of the 
two settlements, established in 1816, and the lodge existing 
there today is as it was originally formed, having had 
absorbed one other lodge which came into being at a much 
later date, and now to Richmond.. 

The name Richmond is of great interest historically 
speaking. The second Duke of Richmond was the eighth Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of England in 1725 and the Fourth 
Duke of Richmond his son, was Provincial Grand Master for 
Sussex under the Grand Lodge of England from 1814 until his 



- 10 - 

death, 1819 near Richmond. The first lodge at Richmond met 
at "Colour Sergeant" Vaughans home until the erection of the 
Masonic Arms Tavern in 1819 and from then on emergent meetings 
only were held at the Vaughan home. With the visit of the 
Duke of Richmond to the village in 1819 he found fault with 
the brethern they were seemingly using a Charter to which 
they were not entitled and the Grand Lodge of England were 
not about to issue them another Charter. They then applied 
for and received from the Grand Masonic Convention at Kingston 
a charter dated September 29, 1821 and Richmond Lodge came 
into being. The first cornerstone laid with Masonic Honours 
within the boundaries of the Ottawa Masonic District was at 
Richmond in 1823. Not wishing to appear in public with 
homemade collars and jewels the brethern borrowed those 
belonging to "The Lodge on the Rideau" at Burritts Rapids 
for the occasion and promptly set about ordering a good set 
of collar jewels for themselves. These collar jewels are a 
history in themselves being stamped with the Lion Rampant 
it was felt they were English sterling silver for this was 
their Hallmark, but in answer to my letter to the Assay 
Office in Birmingham, England, I was informed by the Assay 
Master, A.H. Westwood, that these were faked hallmarks and 
very common in Canada and the United States. He was kind 
enough to point out that a Solomen Marion 1782-1832 born 
in Lachine, Quebec apprenticed to Pierre Huguet dit Latour 
might be responsible for the work. Solomen Marion was a 
working silversmith at St. Francis Xavier St. in Montreal 
in 1819 and was known to have overmarked silver with the 
punch of Lovett besides his own name. Research into this 
Marion the silversmith was slow indeed a few pieces of his 
work showing up in Catholic churches from time to time. A 
letter to the National Gallery as to what silver work was 
in their possession was not too helpful, but on February 8, 
1980 a letter from "Sylvain Allaire" asking me to excuse 
his inexplicable error on Solomen Marion who was very well 
represented in the National Gallery and he was forthwith 
sending me, at no expense a book containing pictures of many 
of the works of Solomen Marion and informing me he was con- 
sidered one of Canada's greatest silversmiths. 

A goodly number of these jewels have been lost over the 
years, some are stamped Grand Lodge of Upper Canada, others 
are stamped with the Lion Rampant and the head of George III 
and the markings are identical to those on the silverwork in 
the National Gallery attributed to Solomen Marion and so a 
successful search comes to an end. If the lack of collar 
jewels was an embarrassment, the absence of charts from which 
to give the lectures caused no bother at all. On the night 
of the meeting either of the Stewards' or Outer Guard would 
prepare the room for lodge work. A pail of whitewash and a 
brush being used to mark out the pertinent requirements, 
including the appropriate chart for the evening's work. A 
light covering of straw would hide the chart until the time 
for its use, then a sweep of the foot and the chart was 
exposed. 

Is it any wonder that for the one city lodge Corinthian 
No. 59 that went into darkness there were about twelve 
country lodges. Although this early lodge was written off 
by Robertson in its early years later records. show it still 
in existence in the 1840 's probably going into darkness about 
1846. 



11 



The present "Goodwood Lodge" No. 159 dates from the time 
of the American Civil War 1863 and in spite of many hardships 
it has survived and contributed greatly to Masonry. Dalhousie, 
Ottawa's first lodge had a charter member, in the person of 
Edward Malloch from Richmond; Doric, Ottawa's second lodge had 
several Richmond personnel, their first Chaplain Charles 
Biggar Pettit, and their first D.D.G.M. although residing in 
Ottawa was a Richmond man, J. P. Featherstone, and Doric's 
first Masonic burial for a lodge member was for James McElroy 
buried here in the village of Richmond. Richmond has given 
charter members to Rideau Lodge, Prince of Wales Lodge, 
Temple Lodge, Bytown Lodge, also to Eddy Lodge, King Solomen 
Lodge, and Pontiac Lodge Shawville. Robert Lyon of Richmond 
applied to Grand Lodge for a charter for "The Builders Lodge" 
and three lodges originate from Goodwood Lodge, Carleton 
Lodge, Carp; Corinthian Lodge, North Gower; and Hazeldean 
Lodge . 

This then has been Richmond's contributation to Masonry 
and worthy of our position as the cradle of Masonry in what 
is now defined as the Ottawa Masonic Districts. 



REVIEWS 

1. By V.W.Bro. Donald J. Woodside, member of Sussex Lodge No 
5 and member of The Heritage Lodge No. 7 30. 

Writing Masonic history seems to be a good deal like 
tracing one's family tree. If a family tree is traced 
completely, in over 10 generations one Will find that he 
has over one thousand ancestors. That is approximately the 
time period covered by this paper. It is hard to find them 
all. It is equally difficult to discover all the groups 
which are antecedents of a Masonic lodge, or area. A paper 
read to The Heritage Lodge on a visit to Belleville in 1979, 
entitled Early Masonry in Eastern Ontario, revealed almost 
none of the information which we have received today. 

Operative masons were included today as well as Specula- 
tive, which was quite rightly done. Records of such groups 
are hard to find, except as to their work with working tools. 

Bro. Harrington's paper tells of quite a few events 
which took place far from the Ottawa area, but which lead up 
to those in this area. 

Bro. Harrington tells us that the present Goodwood Lodge 
No. 159 dates from 1863. Earlier in his paper he says that 
the Ottawa Masonic District had but one lodge, situated in 
the military settlement of Richmond in 1818. In "Whence Come 
We" , lodges listed as under the Second Provincial Grand 
Lodge include Richmond, No. 24 new dispensation about April 
1823. Was this lodge the same one as was listed as 1818? 
Have two lodges been discontinued in Richmond? Am I missing 
some information that is available? 

The paper is interesting and informative, and contained 
much information not known previously to me, although my 
Mother Lodge is in the Ottawa Masonic District, and I have 
visited extensively in that area. 

V.W.Bro. D.J. Woodside 



- 12 - 



2. By W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe. 

Bro. Harrington's paper is rich in information, although 
it is broader in its coverage than the title indicates. 
However, I am always intrigued by the change from operative 
to speculative masonry, and I appreciate his endeavours to 
bring these past records back into circulation. They offer 
wide scope for future research. For example it is likely 
that titled people such as the Right Honourable Lord Alexander, 
Viscount Canada left behind correpondence, or other records 
of his career that might shed more light on his Canadian 
activities. No doubt some researcher will pursue this topic 
further. The records, if any, of the stone masons at work 
on Fort Louisburg, and Quebec might also make a fruitful 
field for another paper on operative masons. Nevertheless, 
I do fault Bro. Harrington because he does not name his 
sources for the various statements in this paper. Without 
them the budding research reader has no idea where to start 
to pursue the subject further. He refers to the "records" 
without naming these records. Two references are too impre- 
cise for me to recognize. Is the "English Lodge of Research" 
really the Quator Coronati Lodge, London? There are many 
research lodges in the British Isles. Does "Canadian Archives" 
refer to the Public Archives Canada, or Archives of the 
Canadian Masonic Order in Hamilton or Toronto? I detect 
information from John Ross Robertson's History of Freemasonry 
in Canada , for part of his sources. I suspect that Freema - 
sonry in Canada , edited by Osborne Sheppard, was the source 
of the Lord Alexander information. If lodge minute books 
were source for the final section of interesting information 
about the Ottawa area and Goodwood Lodge, nothing is indicated 
in the essay, or as a footnote. Sources are essential if we 
hope to attract future study of the subjects by other 
researchers. 

In W.A. Calnek's History of the County of Annapolis , 
published in 1897, there is a somewhat different approach 
to the mysterious stone. The date given is 1609. It may 
have been to commemorate the arrival of settlers that year. 
Another suggestion is that it was 1605, and used as a founda- 
tion stone for a building. A footnote indicates that the 
stone, originally to go to Boston but, according to the 
Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, 1891 , was 
taken to the Royal Canadian Institute, Toronto. It is 
believed that through carelessness of some official or 
servant of the Institute, the stone was allowed to be used 
in construction of an additional wall at the Institute. 
Only a knowledgeable wrecker may be able to find and prove 
the date. 

Bro. Harrington's reference to the outlying guards at 
Burritts Rapids Lodge during the uneasy times of 1812-14, 
helps to explain a mystery I have just come upon in Bath, 
Ontario. A house built by the first farm settler where the 
Village of Bath now stands, has two chimney pieces back to 
back. Entry may be gained from the attic, and a winding 
stair leads down to the height of the mantels where four 
men can easily stand in comfort. We had conjectured that 
these hiding places may have been because of the uneasy times 
for the house is believed to have been built, in 1811. This 
topic is indicative of the value of bringing the work of 



- 13 - 



various researchers under one central publication. Bro. 
Harrington's additional confirmation of our suspicions is 
appreciated. 

I commend Bro. Harrington's persistent research into 
the story of Solomen Marion. A comment on the mysterious 
death of the Duke of Richmond so soon after his criticism 
of the Lodge might enrich our Heritage papers in the future. 
Was he done in by the Masons? Have we another Morgan Affair? 

My sincere congratulations to V.W.Bro. Harrington. I 
know he has raised many possibilities for expanded research. 
Despite my criticism of lack of resources' evidence in his 
presentation, I have benefited, and have enjoyed both read- 
ing and hearing his paper on Early Masonry in the Ottawa 
Area . 

W.Bro. A. J. Cohoe 



3. By W.Bro. Ben Bolton, member of Prince of Wales Lodge 

No. 371, and member of The Heritage Lodge No. 730. This 
review was not received in time for a prepared reply 
and was simply discussed from the floor. 

I was intrigued by the contents of the paper by V.W. 
Bro. Harrington, and must compliment him on the variety of 
his sources of information. 

In my opinion, his presentation is a valuable working 
document that can be used as a basis for further studies 
on some of the facts he has recorded, or that come to mind 
on reading his paper. 

For instance: 

1. Did Masonry spread to the Ottawa valley from the 
first lodge on Dochet Island in Nova Scotia? — or 
was it imported by settlers and/or military men? 

2. The contribution of "military men" in the founding 
of Masonic Lodges in the Ottawa Valley? 

3. The contribution to Masonry, if any, by the stone 
masons who built the Rideau Canal. 

4. The Contribution to Masonry by the main racial 
groups inhabiting the Ottawa Valley eg. The English, 
French, Irish, Poles and Scots. 

5. The trades followed by early lodge members (other 
than "military men"). 

6. The choice of names of Masonic Lodges, and their 
local significance e.g. Goodwood Lodge, Wellington 
Persevering Lodge, Sydney Albert Luke Lodge, 
Pontiac Lodge, Bytown Lodge, etc. 

7. How many lodges went into darkness, and the reasons 
therefore. 

V.W.Bro. Harrington should be encouraged to expand on 
his initial effort, and it is hoped that he will be willing 
and able to follow up these suggestions (and others in a 
similar vein which these will no doubt trigger in his mind) 
in the near future. 

W.Bro. B. Bolton 



- 14 - 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION 

W.Bro. G.T. Jones, in commenting on the burial stone 
found on Goat Island in 1827, stated that J. Ross Robertson 
in Vol. 1 of The History of Freemasonry in Canada mentions 
the piece of trap rock with the figures "1606" and the 
square and compasses indented thereon and cautions that 
although the figures are quite clear the part with the square 
and compasses had been worn away by more than 200 years of 
weathering and hence there is insufficient proof of it having 
masonic significance. Jones went on to say that the stone 
was sent to the Canadian Institute, Toronto and was plastered 
over in a wall in a building erected in that city. 

V. W.Bro. J. Pos, in continuing the saga of the piece of 
trap rock, informed the Brethren that J. Ross Robertson 
further identified the finders as Francis Alger and Dr. C.T. 
Jackson while making a minderalogical survey of Nova Scotia. 
A full description of the stone is found in "The Historical 
and Statistical Accounts of Nova Scotia" published by 
Judge Haliburton in 1829. A brief account of the "Stone" 
appears in "Freemasonry in Quebec" by John H. Graham, 1892; 
who makes further reference to an account by S.D. Nicker son 
in "The History of Freemasonry and Concordant Orders" , 
Boston, 1891. In commenting further, Bro. Pos related how 
the stone arrived in Toronto and was intended to be a corner 
stone in a new building being erected for the "Sons of Scot- 
land" on the corner of Richmond and Clare Streets. But 
the stone was placed with indented markings facing inward and 
were subsequently plastered over, never to be seen again. 
About 1972, the building was being demolished by Temperman 
of Toronto. Mr. Temperman was a mason and had instructed 
his workmen to be particularly observant for any items of 
masonic significance although he was not aware of the history 
of the stone or that it was in fact built into one of the 
walls. In any event by the time Bro. Pos had contacted Bro. 
Temperman, most of the rubble was either buried below an 
asphalt covered parking lot or dumped into Toronto Harbour. 
So, unless the parking lot is to be excavated for a new 
building, in which case there may be a possibility that the 
stone may be found, it would appear that the mystery of the 
stone may never be fully disclosed. 

SUMMARY BY 

V. W.Bro. A. E. Harrington 

V. W.Bro. Donald Woodside, having perused my presentation, 
informs me his mother lodge is in the Ottawa District, yet 
he was unaware of the early history of which I made mention 
with regard to the military settlement of Richmond. 

The visit of the Duke of Richmond to this village in 
1819 brought him in contact with the Masonic Brethern. The 
Duke being Prov. Grand Master of Sussex under the Grand Lodge 
of England found fault with the Charter being used. 

The Brethern in deference to the Duke's wishes returned 
the Charter, but did not receive a Charter in return. 

They applied to and received from, the Grand Masonic 
Convention at Kingston a charter dated September 29, 1821. 



15 - 



This was Richmond's second lodge, about five or six 
years of its ealy life has been recorded by John Ross Robert- 
son. 

It is felt the lodge may have existed until 1846 
although no actual work was seemingly being done. 

I feel pleased that Bro. Woodside agrees with me in 
keeping the operative and speculative histories together. 

My experience has been that any mention of operative 
masonry in Canada is quickly erased by those who have the 
final say in editing the research material. 

Why this early history of masonry in Richmond was not 
discussed at the Heritage Lodge visit to Belleville in 1979 
I can only say it was not asked for. 

I am sure we would have been cooperative in this matter. 

W.Bro. Allan Cohoe takes me to task for not mentioning 
my sources, so I will do just that. 

A great deal of my material concerning "Early Operative 
Masonry" was from Morris Bishop's book "Champlain - The Life 
of Fortitude" . Bishop now retired from Cornell University 
with the title of Kappa Alpha Professor of Romance Literature, 
Emeritus. His attention to detail as regards that first 
settlement of 1604 has been much appreciated. 

Other information of the Operative Period has been 
gleaned from the records of Most Wor . Bros. Graham and 
Harris also Millborne. 

The English Lodge of Research, referred to is of 
course Quator Coronati Lodge, London, England; I know of no 
other English Lodge of Research doing work on Canadian 
Masonry. Canadian Archives refers to Public Archives of 
Canada, Ottawa. 

Information from Rober son's History of Freemasonry in 
Canada refers to the early history of Richmond Lodge. 

A document in Goodwood's records dated March 25, 1890, 
from J. Ross Robertson bears witness to the fact that the 
early records of Richmond Lodge, which were stored in a 
soldier's foot locker, were given to M. Wor. Bro. Robertson, 
by Bro. John Mcllroy. 

These records were never returned to the Lodge. There 
seems to be a great deal of interest connected with the 
famous stone marked with the Square and Compasses and the 
date 1606. W.A. Calnek's "History of the County of Annapolis' 
published in 1897 is in many instances similar to that of 
Graham and Harris, except in one detail. 

The stone was set in a wall of the Royal Canadian 
Institute in Toronto, and the plasterers, not being told 
otherwise, completely sealed in the stone. This building, 
I am informed, no longer exists. Regarding the uneasiness of 
Masons after the war of 1812-14, Bro. Cohoe finds this 



- 16 



uneasiness, among other segments of society at that time, 
and tells of the chimney hiding places. One such hiding 
place can be found on Glen Isle between Carleton Place and 
Almonte, where a man hid for several days and listened to 
his fate being discussed by those searching for him. 

Bro. Cohoe ' s praise of my persistent research into the 
history of Solomon Marion and our ancient collar jewels is 
very much appreciated. 

Bro. Cohoe felt I should comment further on the death 
of Rt. Wor. Bro. Charles Lennox. He asked whither so soon 
after his criticism of the lodge there might be some sinister 
reason for the death of the Duke, with tongue in cheek no 
doubt. In reply I would say this is no Morgan Affair, simply 
told that at Fort William Henry now Sorel, Quebec the Duke 
of Richmond's dog Blutcher tangled with a fox and in separ- 
ating the two the fox bit him. 

The incubation period of Hydrophobia (Rabies) is about 
three months, corresponding to the length of time in which 
the Duke was taken ill and died. Rt. Wor. Bro. Philemon 
Wright sent a team and wagon to take his body to the boat 
that would convey it to Quebec for burial beneath the altar 
of the Anglican Cathedral in that city. A plaque commemorat- 
ing this event has been placed on the wall of that edifice. 

As far as is known no Masonic body attended the burial 
service of Canada's first Masonic Governor General. 



R.W.Bro. Bill Isbister, complimented V.W.Bro. Harrington 
on a very interesting paper which had been presented in a 
most interesting fashion. He further remarked that the 
character of the speaker was certainly reflected in the 
knowledge and detail in which the paper was presented. 

Before turning the meeting back to the Worshipful 
Master, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce thanked Bro. Harrington for an 
excellent paper which maintained the tradition of papers 
presented in The Heritage Lodge. He also thanked the 
Reviewers and those who participated in the discussions. 

He further mentioned that the Lodge is always interested 
in receiving papers that may be presented at future meetings. 
Please send them directly to Frank J. Bruce, 46 Muir Drive, 
Scarborough, Ontario M1M 3B4 or the Lodge Secretary and 
Editor. 

MOTION RE: VOTE OF THANKS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Al Newell, who spoke 
on behalf of the Worshipful Master, Officers, Members and 
Visitors, and seconded by V.W.Bro. L. Ferguson that a hearty 
vote of thanks be extended to Bro. Harrington. This was 
supported by the applause of all Brethren present. The 
Worshipful Master also added his personal thanks. 

With W.Bro. Wm. Cooke temporarily occupying the W. 
Master's chair, V.W.Bro. Harrington met R.W.Bro. Ronald 
Groshaw on the level and presented to him a copy of the 



- 17 



History of Goodwood Lodge. He also presented to The Heritage 
Lodge, on behalf of both Ottawa Districts, copies of some 
16 articles and artifacts for our Masonic Archives. 

INTRODUCTIONS 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on our Lodge 
Representatives in the two Ottawa Districts to introduce the 
members of The Heritage Lodge who were present from their 
respective districts: 

Ottawa District #1 - W.Bro. Ben Bolton introduced R.W. 
Bro. Jack Pell, V. W.Bro. Alf Harrington and Master-Elect 
John Hogg. Bro. Bolton also informed the Lodge that the 
Royal Arch Library had been transferred to Clearwater, 
Florida and that he had presented, on behalf of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, two books to be placed in the Library for 
use of the Florida Brethren. 

Ottawa District #2 - W.Bro. Glen Jones introduced W. 
Bro. Gilbert Beckett and V. W.Bro. Alf Harrington. 

CLOSE THE LODGE 

After receiving instructions from W.Bro. Wm. Cooke on 
the best route for the Dedication Ceremonies in Pembroke, 
and several other announcements, including thanks from our 
acting Junior Warden, V. W.Bro. L. Ferguson, to the Brethren 
of Goodwood Lodge for providing the refreshments, the Lodge 
was closed in harmony at 10:55 a.m. 

J. Pos, 
Secretary/Editor 



- 18 



NINETEENTH REGULAR MEETING 



PROCEEDINGS 



The Nineteenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, May 20, 1981, with 9 Officers, 
21 Other Members and 2 Visitors for a total of 32 Masons 
as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree, with some 
hesitation, at 7:30 p.m. The Worshipful Master thanked 
those in attendance, particularly as this meeting followed 
only four days after the last meeting. 

CONFIRMING MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, 
seconded by R.W.Bro. Bill Isbister, that the minutes of the 
Eighteenth Regular Meeting, as read by the Secretary, be 
accepted and confirmed. Motion carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

There was no written correspondence; but a verbal 
communication with a member of the Lodge, who wishes to 
remain anonymous, has resulted in the payment of the arrears 
of dues on behalf of a suspended member of the Lodge. 

ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $820.49 were 
presented, along with a request to purchase a new minute 
book, and on a motion by V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen, were passed and ordered paid. 

The House of Print, Guelph 

Printing Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 4, No. 3, 

Inv. #61420 " $486.24 

The Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corp. , 

Rent for 1981-82 320.00 

The K&W Brant Masonic Directory: 

1 Copy of K & W Brant Masonic Directory 2.00 

R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley: 

By cash to Commercial Copy Centre Inc., 

Toronto, for photographic work re: 

Warrant, Inv. #019186 12.25 

TOTAL $820.49 



19 



RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for membership by affiliation were received 
from the following: 

1. LITTLEJOHN, Alister B. , P.D.D.G.M.; R.R. #2, Wallacetown, 
Ontario; Age 62; Farmer; member of Cameron Lodge No. 232, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W„Bro. A.N. Newell and V.W.Bro. 
L. Ferguson. 

2. BRADFORD, William Russell Carman, P.M.; 11 Stamford Dr., 
Perth, Ontario; Age 56; Professional Agrologist; member 
of True Briton's Lodge No. 14, G.R.C.; recommended by 
V.W.Bro. J. Pos and V.W.Bro. L. Ferguson. 

3. HANAFI, Nabeel A., W.M. ; P.O. Box 6082-J, Ottawa, Ontario 
Age 47; Senior Technologist Administration; member of 
Carleton Lodge No. 465, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. 

J. Pell and W.Bro. G.W. Beckett. 

4. SEWELL, Albert Baxter Bennett, P.M.; 1924 Bromley Rd., 
Ottawa, Ontario; Age 51; Self-employed; member of Acacia 
Lodge No. 561, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. G.R. 
Jackson and V.W.Bro. L. Ferguson. 



FOOTE, Frederick Stephen, P.G.S.; 

Sudbury, Ontario; Age 57; Chemist 

No. 427, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. A.N. Newell and 

R.W.Bro. D.C. Bradley. 



477 Elizabeth St. , 
member of Nickel Lodge 



MOTION RE: APPLICATIONS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Bill Isbister seconded 
by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley that the Petitions be received, 
published in the Lodge Summons for balloting at the following 
Regular Meeting. Motion carried. 

CALLING FROM L. TO R. TO L. 

At 7:54 p.m., the Lodge was called from labour to refresh- 
ment for purpose of attending a meeting of the Committee on 
General Purposes. Lodge was reconvened at 10:22 p.m. 



MOTIONS 



1. By R.W.Bros. Isbister/Steen to accept the invitation 
from the Sudbury-Manitoulin District, Masters and 
Wardens Association to hold a Regular Meeting of The 
Heritage Lodge in the Masonic Temple, Sudbury, Ont- 
ario, September 19, 1981, at 2:00 p.m. or 2:30 p.m. 
if more convenient. Motion carried. 

2. By R.W.Bros. Curtis/Carson, that V.W.Bro. J. Pos 

be appointed Proxy for the 126th Annual Communication 
of Grand Lodge. Motion carried. 



3. By R.W.Bros. Carson/Strutt , that the Report of the 
Committee on General Purposes be accepted. Motion 
carried. 



20 



4. By W.Bro. Amis and R.W.Bro. Grinton, that the 
Secretary proceed with correspondence re: rein- 
statement and demits for members of The Heritage 
Lodge. Motion carried. 

5. By R.W.Bro. Ralph and W.Bro. Rev. Rivers, that a 
vote of thanks be extended to R.W.Bro. Charles F. 
Grimwood for his time and energies in preparing the 
material for the booklet "The Lodge Historian". 
Motion carried by the applause of the Brethren. 

NOTICE OF MOTION 

R.W.Bro. Ed Wilson announced that at the next regular 
meeting of the Lodge he would move or cause to be moved the 
following proposed alteration to the By-Laws of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730: 

ARTICLE IX - MEMBERSHIP 

A. Change the first sentence of Paragraph 1 to read - 
"Every applicant for full membership in ..." 

B. Add the following sub-paragraph to Paragraph 1 - 
"Every Master Mason in good standing in the juris- 
diction of this Grand Lodge or those Grand Lodges 
with which we are in amity, regardless of his place 
of residence, may become a Correspondence Subscriber 
on proof of his good standing and on payment of a 
sum equal to the annual dues of the Lodge. Such 
payment shall entitle the Subscriber to receive all 
regular publications of the Lodge for the current 
year and to visit the Lodge at any of its regular 
meetings, but shall not entitle him to become an 
Officer or to vote on any questions brought before 
the Lodge." 

PRESENTATIONS 

At this time V. W.Bro. Randall Langs, on behalf of the 
Masters, Past Masters and Wardens Association of Brant 
District presented a book, continuing the History of Brant 
District, to R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw, to be placed in the Lodge 
Library. 

R.W.Bro. Groshaw, on behalf of The Heritage Lodge, 
accepted the book with deep gratitude and instructed the 
Secretary to write a letter of thanks and appreciation to the 
President of the Brant District Association. Editors note - 
The Heritage Lodge is always receptive to receiving any 
historical records from Masons, Lodges and Districts of Craft 
Masonry or other Masonic Bodies in this Masonic Jurisdiction 
or other Jurisdictions. Please send to the Editor or make 
a personal presentation at our Regular Lodge Meetings. 

R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph invited R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 
G.S.W., to meet him on the level in the East where he 
presented a beautiful Grand Senior Wardens Candle which be 
brought back on a recent visit to England; remarking in humour 
that our Junior Warden may need the light. 

Following a number of announcements, the Lodge was closed 
in harmony at 10:36 p.m. 

J. Pos, Secretary/Editor 



21 



FROM THE SECRETARY'S DESK 



Item 1. As you will have noticed, the Lodge Proceedings are 
becoming quite extensive; particularly when the minutes 
of two meetings are combined in a single report. In 
spite of our efforts to streamline the meetings and 
reduce the written material, we are now on our second 
Lodge Minute Book even though we have been in existance 
for only 4 years. It has also been necessary to pur- 
chase a second membership register as we have exceeded 
the capacity of the extended posts on the first one. 
Our membership, as of the most recent Grand Lodge 
Returns, has now reached 354 with about 12 more being 
processed at the present time. This is still short of 
our objective of 400 for a viable organization. 

Item 2. Upon the death of W.Bro. Oliver T. Flint, January 
10, 1978, a Charter Member of our Lodge and the Secre- 
tary in Ontario for the Correspondence Circle, Quatuor 
Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, England, representing 
Ontario West and Ontario South, it was suggested that 
The Heritage Lodge might carry on the fine tradition 
and good service provided by Bro. Flint. This appeared 
to be a logical solution as the structure and format, 
although not comparable, was somewhat similar. However, 
the policy of Quatuor Coronati would not permit and they 
preferred to deal directly with a person. Therefore, 
your Secretary, on behalf of The Heritage Lodge agreed 
to take on the job until such time as someone within 
the Lodge would accept the Office as Secretary for 
Ontario West and South. The total memberships is 
approximately 200. Therefore, anyone interested in 
working directly with Quatuor Coronati Lodge and wishing 
further information please communicate with V. W.Bro. 
J. Pos, phone (519) 821-4995 (evenings). 

Item 3. As one of Fifth Year Anniversary Projects, the 

Lodge will be binding the accumulated copies of Lodge 
Proceedings, commencing with The Founders Meeting, May 
18, 1977, to May 1982. These will comprise more than 
550 pages, to be bound with a hard cover and gold 
embossed lettering used for the Book Title. The purchase 
price will be approximately $25.00. Anyone wishing to 
have their name placed on the reserve list should com- 
municate with the Secretary at their earliest convenience, 
Since we have material for only 50 copies they will 
obviously become a collectors item therefore, the first 
names received and recorded will be given highest 
priority. 

Item 4. Membership Fees for 1981-82 will be due September 
1st, 1981, in the amount of $15.00. If you have not 
already done so please remit as soon as possible and 
yours dues card will be sent to you with the next Lodge 
Proceedings. 

Item 5. It is now possible to exempt yourself from further 

payment of Membership Fees by purchase of a Life Member- 
ship. This year, for members in good standing, the total 
amount is $190.00, which includes $25.00 Grand Lodge 
Commutation Fee and the first year's dues in advance. 



- 22 - 



COMING EVENTS 

SEPTEMBER 16, 1981, (Wednesday evening, 7:30 p.m.), Twentieth 
Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge to be held in 
the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge. As this 
is the annual election of Officers for the year 1981-82 
a good attendance is important. Time will also be 
allocated for the Committee on General Purposes. 

OCTOBER 3, 1981, (Saturday afternoon, 2:00 p.m.), An Emergent 
Meeting of The Heritage Lodge to be held in the Masonic 
Temple, Sudbury, under the auspices of the Sudbury- 
Manitoulin District Masters and Wardens Association. A 
paper titled "Women in Freemasonry" will be presented. 

NOVEMBER 18, 1981, (Wednesday evening, 7:30 p.m.), Twenty- 
First Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge to be held 
in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge. 
Installation and Investiture Ceremonies and the Official 
Visit of the D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District. 



PROPOSED PAPERS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS 

1. Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge, but 
patronized by many Masons, to be prepared by Bro. Gordon 
R. Brittain. 

2. Masonic Research Lodges - An Up-to-Date Review, to be 
prepared by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

3. Anti-Masonic Groups - Individual Political and Ecclesiast- 
ical, suggested by R.W.Bro. E.J. Burns Anderson. A 
volunteer is still needed. 

4. Important Masons of the First Provincial Grand Lodge in 
Canada, 1792-1822, to be prepared by W.Bro. Robert 
Butler. 

5. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant-Mohawk Indian 
Chief, to be prepared by V. W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

PLEASE NOTE: Suggestions for paper titles are always welcome 
Volunteers are needed to search for material, to present 
papers, to review papers and to work on Committees. 
Please contact the Secretary or R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, 
46 Muir Dr., Scarborough, Ontario, M1M 3B4 , phone (416) 
261-8147. 



ATTENTION: If there is sufficient interest, for those 

travelling to the Emergent Meeting in Sudbury, October 
3, 1981, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph will arrange to Charter a 
Bus leaving from Hamilton, Toronto or some other conven- 
ient place. If you are interested, please get in touch 
with him (home phone (416) 447-4152) or myself and 
indiciate preferred point of departure and whether you 
would leave Friday afternoon or very early Saturday 
morning. 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1980 - 1981 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 
M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2W4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davie s 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R. W. Bro. Talbot L. Peyton 

^6 Culpepper Dr., Waterloo, N2L 5L1 

LODGE OFFICERS 
1980 - 1981 

W.M. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw Tyler R.W.Bro. C.F. Grimwood 

I. P.M. R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton Sec'y V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos 

S.W. W.Bro. George E. Zwicker A/Sec'y R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph 

J.W. R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley Treas. R.W.Bro. G.J. Powell 

S.D. R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley D.C. R.W.Bro. Keith Plynn 

J.D. R.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew Chap. W.Bro. Rev. G. Rivers 

I.G. R.W.Bro. Robert S. Throop Organist R.W.Bro. Len R. Hertel 

S.S. W.Bro. Albert A. Barker Historian W.Bro. Henry G. Edgar 

J.S. R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen 

LODGE COMMITTEES FOR I98O - I98I 

GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker (S.W.)j 
Secretary, R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph; members include all 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees, Officers and Past Masters. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph; 

R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley; V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; R.W. 
Bro. Bert A. Mennie; and R. 'W.Bro. Robert S. Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & EN ERTAINMENT - Chairman, W.Bro. Albert A. Barker (SS) 
R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen (J.S.); Local Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn (DC); R.W.Bro. Charles 
F. Grimwood (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce; R.W.Bro. 
Gary J. Powell; and V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn; W.Bro. Ron G. Cooper. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Paul Engel; R.W.Bro. Balfour 

LeGresley; R.W.Bro. James Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley; 
and W.Bro. Kenneth G. Bartlett. 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy 
S. Sparrow; and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley; R.W. 
Bro. Edsel C. Steen; and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

BY-LAWS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson; V.W.Bro. Randall Langs; 
and V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after a Brother's 
name, this is an automatic appointment as defined in the 
Lodge By-Laws. The duties of all Lodge Committees are out- 
lined in Article VIII, Sections 1 to 11.